Skip to main content

Full text of "Recreation"

See other formats


HARVARD UNIVERSITY. 




LIBRARY 



i 



OF THE 

MUSEUM OF COMPARATIVE ZOOLOGY 

5 -5777 3 

Bequest of 
WILLIAM BREWSTER 



JJjUUmU&L #, IQ<Z0 



DEC 4 1920 



v/. V, 



RECREAT 




A MONTHLY MAGAZINE DEVOTED TO EVERYTHING THE 

NAME IMPLIES 



VOLUME XIX 
JULY TO DECEMBER, 1903 



G. O* SHIELDS (Coquina), Editor and Manager 



NEW YORK 
West 24th Street 
1903 



Copyright, 1903, by G. Q. Shields. 



INDEX TO VOLUME XIX. 



PAGE 

Ben Doubled Him Up into a Wad and Sent Him Spinning Frontispiece 

Ben; the Story of a Cub. Illustrated W. H. Wright 3 

The Bread of Idleness. Illustrated Robert P. Lowry 15 

Photographing in the Moro Country. Illustrated Geo. D. Rice **■ 17 

A Place Just East of Persia. Poem A. L. Vermilya 18 

The Hawk Bounty Question. Illustrated J. E. Tylor 19 ^ 

With a Peeled Pole Frederic Bigelow 21 

The Seagull. Poem Edith M. Church 22 

A Study of Feathers. Illustrated Mary M. Caldwell 24 

W'y De Fish Don' Bite. Poem Edward Bonnel 25 

What Wouldn't I Give. Poem ".A. N. Kilgore 2.^ 

The Jacana. Illustrated L. P. Gray 28 

Pounding the Wrong Coon W. H. Nelson 29 

Montana Reminiscences J. A. Duffy 31 

The Florida Kid. XI Charley Apopka 33 

A Day Off. Poem Emma G. Curtts 34 

The Truant. Poem E. L. Sarin 42 

The Bulls Stood Still and Gave Me a Chance for Another Shot '. Frontispiece 

Hunting Blue Bulls in India. Illustrated W. H. Fee 85 

Loon Notes and Queries. Illustrated Robert J. Sim 89 

The Giant Brown Bears of Alaska. Illustrated . J. A. Loring 91 

Tarpon Fishing at Pass Christian. Illustrated _ . .... M. Snowden 95 

A Tragedy. Poem A. L. Vermilya 96 

An Interesting Summer Boarder. Illustrated J. H. Fisher, Jr. 97 

In the Woods with Rod and Camera F. W. Halsey, M.D. 100 

A Trip for Trout. Illustrated '. Dr. J. S. Emans 103 

Tenderfeet in the Grand Discharge Robert Frothingham 107 

Wild Sheep in Captivity. Illustrated Harry E. Lee 112 

The Battle of the Prong Horns W. T. Heddon 113 

He Was Uttering His Weird Call in Tones as Inspiring and as Musical as the Notes of 

a Flute ... Frontispiece 

Hunting Elk in a Windfall. Illustrated E. B. Shanks 167 

Some Feathered Folk. Illustrated Martha M. Williams 171 

A Deer Hunt in Mexico J. K. Eichhorn 175 

Rafting on the St. Joe. Illustrated. Geo. H. Root 177 

Catching a Catfish. Illustrated F. D. Greene 181 

Bob White. Poem Ira Sweet i 82 

Quail Shooting in Kentucky A. S. Atkinson 183 

A Leaf from the Log of the Rosamond. Illustrated Chas. Van Brunt, Jr. 185 

Among the Sandhills John McNeil 187 

Hadn't Lost Any Bear Boyd C. Packer 191 

Jock o' the Gun. Poem Dorothy H. Barron 192 

A Florida Kid on a Camp Hunt. XII Charley Apopka 193 

Our Trophies G. A. Mack 195 

He Stopped, One Forefoot on the Fallen Trunk, One Reaching for the Ground Beyond. .. .Frontispiece 

My Dog Foss. Illustrated George E. Dods 249 

A Duck-Shooting Reminiscence .Capt. E. L. Munson, U. S. A. 253 

Antelope Hunting in Wyoming. Illustrated E. C. Hall 255 

The Travels of a Hunting Knife Dr. A. J. Woodcock 261 

A Morning's Duck Shooting. Illustrated . .' .H. W. Closs 265 

When the Frost is on the Pumpkin. Poem A. N. Kilgore 266 

Gabe Bear's Baccy . . . . . .Theodore Roberts 267 

Goose Shooting in Manitoba. Illustrated ,H. M. Laing 271 

Grandaddy's OF Rifle. Poem. Illustrated J. B. Adams 274 

The Grizzly's Ghost Stanley Mayall 276 

The Duck Shooter's Complaint. Poem ....:.......... .A. M. H. 277 

A Night in a Fishing Hut W. Rogers 279 

The Colonel's Victory A. L. Vermilya 314 



PAGE 

Down Over the Old Buena Vista Trail Came a Lone Horseman Frontispiece 

The Mystery of Stirrup Ranch, illustrated H. N. Beecher 331 

Tex. Poem. Ilustrated J. H. Smith 335 

Elk in Wyoming. Illustrated S. N. Leek 337 

De Huntah's Jubilee. Poem , Fred W. Goshorn 338 

A Turkey Hunt in New Mexico. Illustrated. . J. E. Beck 339 

September. Poem C. C. Haskins 340 

A Turkey Hunt of Long Ago. Illustrated M. B. 341 

Our Hunt at Fence Lake, Mich Joe A. Bottkol 343 

Picture Making with the Aid of the Camera. Illustrated K. Rowa 345 

Hunstman Come. Poem C. G. Rideout 346 

In the Upper Peninsula. Illustrated A. B. Richmond 347 

Bill Brown's Retriever Palmer C. Goble, Jr. 351 

Four Surprises at Once . Jack Wood 352 

Lost in the Devil's Garden. Illustrated f J. E. Tylor 3 53 

My Balsam Pillow. Poem : .Meda 357 

To My Pipe. Poem Arnold Townsend 358 

Duck Shooting on Ipswich Bay. . M. R. Lovett 359 

Heliographing on Mount Adams C. E. Rusk 361 

A West Texas Hunt. Hon. H. S. Moran 365 

Deer in Colorado. M. S. Bacon 367 

When My Ship Comes In. Poem A. L. Vermilya 368 

I Strung Them on the Barrel of My Gun and Started for the Boat Frontispiece 

A Goose Hunt on the Rio Grande. Illustrated S. B. Gillett 413 

The North Woods. Poem W. M. Bryan, M.D. 414 

Duck Shooting on the St. Lawrence Ashley D. Conger 415 

Leaves from a Trapper's Note Book. Illustrated A. T. Bickford .417 

The Architecture of a Beaver Dam Frank R. Grover 419 

Shoot'n Time. Poem Thomas Jackson 420 

Eccentricities of the Beaver A. Whitehead 421 

Fox Hunting in New England Ernest Russell 424 

Harlequin Duck. Illustrated Allan Brooks 428 

From Turkeys to Quails T. H. Frazer 429 

Stice's Christmas Turkey W. F. Short, Jr. 430 

Kitchi Gi-os-se Waw-be An-ne We-og - Simon Pokagon 431 

A White Rabbit Hunt A. C. Todd 432 

Winter. Poem • Ira Sweet 435 

Antoine on Ice. W. E. Parker 436 

How I Killed My Boar - D. J. M'Gillivray 437 

In the Big Woods -* • H. S. Bull 439 

Recollections of Burma H. T. Davies 441 

At Long Range Albert W. Davies 443 

A Vacation. An Idyl C- Q- Haskins xxiv 



From the Game Fields, 35, 115, 197, 283, 369, 445 

Fish and Fishing 43, 127, 266, 293, 373. 451 

Guns and Ammunition 47, 131, 211, 295, 337, 

455 

Natural History 53, 139, 217, 301, 386, 461 

League of American Sportsmen. .57, 143, 223, 305, 

389, 464 



Forestry 60, 147, 226, 308, 393, 469 

Pure and Impure Foods, 63, 149, 229, 311, 395, 473 

Publisher's Notes 67, 151, 233, 476 

Editor's Corner 70, 152, 234, 313, 397, 478 

Amateur Photography. . 74, 156, 238, 320, 404, 484 
Book Notices 65 , 23 r 



VOLUME XIX. 
NUriBHR 1 



JULY, 1903 



$1.00 A YEAR 
10c. A COPY 



.u 




BEN, THE LIFE STORY OF A CUB; 

The Greatest Bear Story ever Written, with Numerous Illustrations by R. F. OUTCAULT^ 



There comes a time in the life of every 
individual when the vse of a stimulant 
is not only advisable but necessary 



AS you approach the calm and mellow evening of your life you 
have doubtless learned the value of a pure and wholesome 
cereal stimulant to sweeten solitude and keep off the blues. 

When choosing a stimulant for medicinal use or purpose of good 
cheer endeavor to obtain a mild soothing amiable fluid that does not 
inflame or excite, but gently stirs and quickens the life current. 

REGISTERED AND SPECIAL BRANDS 



Per Gal. 

Holiday Pure Rye - 4.00 

(Eleven Years Old) > 

Hermitage Rock & Rye 4.00 

Superior 

Five pounds of rock candy crystals 
to each gallon of seven year old 
Hermitage Rye whiskey, is used in 
the preparation of our Celebrated 
Rock and Rye. 

Bon Ton Cocktails - 4.00 

Martini, Manhattan, Vermouth, 
Whiskey, Tom Gin and Holland 
Gin. Carefully prepared from the 
choicest materials, perfectly blended. 

Ruthven Sherry - 4.00 

From Duff, Gordon & Co. Warranted 
twenty years in the wood before 
bottling. Rich and fruity. 



Per Gal. 

Old Gold Bourbon - $4.00 

(Eleven Years Old) 

Jewel Port - 4.00 

From Silva & Cosens, Oporto. A 
choice product of the grape. 

Rainbow Brandy V.0. 4.00 

The product of one of the best Ameri- 
can Vineyards, with all the medici- 
nal qualities of French Brandy. 

Jupiter Gin - 4.00 

From the Swan Distillery, Schiedam, 
Holland, where Good Gin comes 
from. Tastes differ. Many people 
appreciate Good Gin. Jupiter is the 
best the world affords. 

Medford Old Rum - 4.00 

From Daniel Lawrence & Sons, Med- 
ford, Mass. 



On receipt of your order with $6.00, we will ship 6 full quarts 

assorted to suit, transportation charges prepaid, to any railroad point 
in the United States where the charges for transportation do not 
exceed $2.00. Yon cannot afford to let this chance go by. You 
never before had as good an offer. 

If you accept our offer you will surely receive the BEST and the 
HOST for your money that ever came to you from any similar propo- 
sition. 

Remit cash in registered letter or by express company or P. O. 
money order. 

References; Any bank in Boston. Any mercantile agency or 
any distiller of importance in the United States. 

W. H. JONES & CO-rXlcKS **• 

ESTABLISHED i85* 



RECREATION 

Copyright, December, 1902, by G. O. Shields 
A Monthly Magazine Devoted to Everything the Name Implies 



!i.oo A Year. 

10 Cents a Copy. 



G. O. SHIELDS (COQUINA), 
Editor and Manager. 



23 West 24TH Street, 

New York 



CONTENTS OF THIS NUMBER 

Ben Doubled Him Up into a Wad and Sent Him Spinning 

Ben; the Story of a Cub. Illustrated .. 

The Bread of Idleness. Illustrated 

Photographing- in the Moro Country. Illustrated 

A Plaoe Just East of Persia. Poem 

The Hawk Bounty Question. Illustrated 

With a Peeled Pole 

The Seagull- Poem 

A Study of Feathers. Illustrated 

W'y De Fish Don' Bite. Poem 

What Wouldn't I Give. Poem 

The Jacana. Illustrated 

Pounding the Wrong Coon 

Montana Reminiscences 

The Florida Kid- XI 

A Day Off. Poem 

The Truant. Poem 



From the Game Fields 35 

Fish and Fishing 43 

Guns and Ammunition 47 

Natural History 53 

The League of American Sportsmen 57 

Forestry 60 



Pure and Impure Foods 

Book Notices 

Publisher's Notes 

Editor's Corner 

Amateur Photography . 



PAGE 

Frontispiece 

.W.H.Wright 3 

...Robert P. Lowry 15 

Geo. D. Rice 17 

A.L. Vermilya 18 

J.E.Tylor 19 

• Frederic Bigelow 21 

.. Edith M. Church 22 

.Mary M. Caldwell 24 

Edward Bonnel 25 

A.N.Kilgore 27 

L.P.Gray 28 

W. H.Nelso"n 29 

J.A.Duffy 31 

Charley Apopka 33 

Emma G.Curtis 34 

E. L. Sabin 42 

• 63 

65 

• 67 

■ 7° 

74 



Entered as Second-Class Matter at New York Post-Office, Oct, 17, ii 




TIDINESS 



and COMFO*RT 

for all men hy using 

WASHBURNE'S 



Cuff Holders 



Skii\ Diseases 

Eczema, Salt Rheum, Pimples, Ring- 
worm, Itch, Ivy Poison, Acne or other 
skin troubles, can be promptly cured by 



Instantly Attached or Detached. 

Sent Prepaid for 20 Cents. 

Scarf Holder 10 Cents. 

Key Ring and Chain ... 25 Cents. 

They never come loose — a. tiny lever <with a 
bulldog grip. 
Illustrated Catalogue of others on request. 
AMERICAN RING CO., Dept.44,Waterbury, Conn 




Hydrozone is endorsed by leading phy- 
sicians. It is absolutely harmless, yet 
most powerful healing agent, that cures 
by destroying the parasites which cause 
these diseases. 

Cures sunburn in 24 hours. In cases of 
Prickly Heat and Hives it will stop itch- 
ing at once, also will relieve mosquito 
bites instantly. Take no substitute and 
see that every bottle bears my signature. 

TriaJ Size, 25 Cents. 

At Druggists or by ma^il, from 




F— 59 Prince St., New York. 

wmvv /Booklet on the rational treat* 
* K, ' fi \ment of diseases sent free. 



11 



RECREATION. 



Waltham Watches 

Accurate and durable. 



4* 



The Perfected American Watch/' an illustrated book 
of interesting information about watches, will be sent 
free upon request* 

American Waltham Watch Company, 
Waltham, Mass. 



Colorado 

AND RETURN 

First-class to Denver, Colorado Springs and Pueblo from Chicago, com- 
mencing June i and continuing throughout the summer, good returning 
October 31. Tickets reading to same points and return will be sold at 
the rate of $25.00 from July 1 to 10. Return limit, August 31. Corre- 
spondingly low rates from other points. 

The Colorado Special 



fast daily train, one night to Denver from Chicago and the Central 
States (only two nights en route from the Atlantic seaboard), 

leaves Chicago daily 6.3c p. m. ^^. 

A second daily train leaves Chicago 11.30 p. m. 
Personally conducted excursions in tourist sleep- 
ing cars. 

All agents sell tickets via this route. 

Write for particulars to W. B. Kniskern, P. T. M 

C. & N.-W. Ry., Chicago. 

Chicago, Union Pacific and 
North-Western Line 



UNION 
PACIFIC 



<2^£J*£p 



RECREATION. 



m 





simple a child can operate 
tvith entire safety 

Catalogue D, including Marine Gasoline Engines of from % 
to 80 horse-power at corresponding prices, free on request. 

THE C. H. BLOMSTROM MOTOR. CO. 
1284.1294 lUver Street, Detroit, MlcK. 

(From the Chicago jfournal, May 7th). 
At last an honest soul has put a 15^ foot launch with gas- 
oline engine — 4 foot beam — within the reach of the masses. 

THE JV EtO tO A •KHzsaas 




RECREATION. 




;„ :^ ,:— ij g% 








VfA 








in postage stamps will bring the biggest catch an angler, camj.er or 
sportsman can land — Abercrombie and Fitch's catalogue R, 160 pages, 
cuts and prices. 

We guarantee to furnish a more satisfactory fisherman's outfit than can 
be obtained elsewhere. 

Complete outfits for explorers, campers and prospectors. Camp outfits 
from the most modest and practical to the most complete and luxurious. 

Compare our prices on tents, clothing, cooking outfits, folding buckets, camp packs, cots, chairs, food bags, folding 
shelves, guns, boots, moccasins, sleeping bags, pack saddles, stoves, pneumatic beds, cushions, duffle bags, pack harness 5 
folding bakers, folding lanterns, rolling tables, fishing tackle, shoes, covers, &c. 

314=316 BROADWAY, NEW YORK CITY 



RECREATION. 



V! 




The Cadillac 

The Automobile that Solves the Problem 

Until the Cadillac was made, all automobile construction was more or 
less experimental — no one had made an entirely satisfactory motor 
vehicle. This machine is made on a new system developed from the ex- 
periences of all previous makers: the faults and weaknesses of the old 
methods have been avoided and a new ideal of motor travel developed that 
gives a perfect vehicle for comfort, speed, absolute safety, greatest dura- 
bility, simplicity of operation, wide radius of travel, and reliability under 
all conditions of roads. There is no other automobile that can be com- 
pared to the Cadillac in any particular of speed, stability, ease of operation 
or convenience of use. You should not buy before examining this won- 
derful new machine. Price f.o.b. at factory, $750. 

The new tonneau attachment, at an extra cost of $100, gives a com- 
bination of light carriage for city streets and substantial touring car for 
country roads — practically two motor vehicles in one, with a seating capacity 
of two or four, as required — a very graceful effect in either use. Write 
for new illustrated booklet. K. 

CADILLAC AUTOMOBILE COMPANY, Detroit, Mich. 




VI 



RECREATION. 




From Chicago, every day, July I to 10, 
inclusive. Return limit, August 31, 1903. 

These are some of the inducements to spend 
a vacation among the Rockies offered by the 

Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul 

and 

Union Pacific Line. 

You can leave Chicago at 10.25 any evening 
and enjoy a quick, comfortable trip to 
Colorado. Standard sleeping cars and free 
reclining chair cars from Union Station, 
Chicago, to Union Station, Denver. 
Additional information on request. 

F. A. MILLER, 

General Passenger Agent, 

CHICAGO. 

Christian Endeavor Convention, Denver, July 9 to 13. 



RECREATION. 



vn 



THE 

FOUR-TRACK 

NEWS 

An Illustrated Magazine 
of Travel and Education 

MORE THAN 100 PAGES MONTHLY 
Its scope nnd character are indicated by the following 
titles ot articles that have appeared in recent issues: 

Picturesque Venezuela — Illus. . . Frederick A. Ober 
Haunts ot Eben Holden— Illus . . Del B Salmon 
A Journey Among the Stars— Illua. Frank W. Mack 
In the Great North Woods — Poem . Eben B. Rexford 
Beautiful Porto Rico — Illustrated Hezekiah Butterworth 
In Rip Van Winkle's Land — Poem . Minna Irving 
Nature's Chronometer — Illustrated . H. M. Albaugh 
Van Arsdale,The Platitudinarian-Ill. Chas. Battell Loomis 
The Three Oregons — Illustrated . . Alfred Holman 
Ancient Prophecies Fulfilled— Illus. Georse H. Daniels 
The Stories the Totems Tell— Illus. Luther L. Holden 
A Little Country Cousin— Illustrated Kathleen L. Greig 
The Mazamas — Illustrated . . . Will G. Steel 
When Mother Goes Away— Poem . Joe Cone 
A Little Bit of Holland— Illustrated Charles B, Wells 
The Romance of Reality— Illustrated Jane W. Guthrie 
Samoa and Tutuila — Illustrated . Michael White 
Under Mexican Skies — Illustrated 
Niagara in Winter — Illustrated . 
Little Histories— Illustrated 

Old Fort Putnam . . , . . 

The Conlederate White House 

The Alamo John K. Le Baron 

SINGLE COPIES 5 CENTS, or 30 CENTS a YEAR 

Can be had of newsdealers, or by addressing 

George H. Daniels, Publisher 

Room No. 48 7 East 42d Street, New York 



Marin B. Fenwick 
Ornn E. Dunlap 

William J. Lampton 
Herbert Brooks 



"Free from the care which wearies and annoys 
Where every hour brings its several joys." 



"AMERICA'S 

SUMMER 

RESORTS" 

This is one of the most complete pub; 
lications of its kind, and will assist 
those who are wondering where they 
will go to spend their vacation this 
summer. 

It contains a valuable map, in addi- 
tion to much interesting information re- 
garding resorts on or reached by the 

NEW YORK CENTRAL LINES 



A copy will be sent free, postpaid, to any address on 
receipt of a two-cent stamp, by George H. Daniels, 
General Passenger Agent, New York Central & Hudson 
River Railroad, Grand Central Station, New York. 



" There's recreation in the books themselves." 



77 Information 
Bureaus of the 
New York Central Lines 



Each city ticket office of the New 
York Central, Boston & Albany, Michi- 
gan Central, Lake Shore, Big Four, 
Pittsburg & Lake Erie, and Lake Erie 
& Western Railroads in the cities of 
New York, Brooklyn, Boston, Worces- 
ter, Springfield, Albany, Utica, Montreal, 
Syracuse, Rochester, Buffalo, Niagara 
Falls, Toronto, Detroit, Cleveland, Pitts- 
burg, Columbus, Indianpolis, Cincinnati, 
Louisville, St. Louis, Chicago, Denver, 
San Francisco, Portland, Los Angeles, 
and Dallas, Texas, is an information 
bureau where desired information re- 
garding rates, time of trains, character 
of resorts, hotel accommodations, and a 
thousand and one other things the in- 
tending traveler wants to know will be 
freely given to all callers. 

A copy of the 52-page Illustrated Catalogue of the 
" Four-Track Series " will be sent free upon receipt of a 
two-cent stamp by George H. Daniels, General Passenger 
Agent, New York Central & Hudson River Railroad, 
Grand Central Station, New York. 



" A sublime spectacle." 



NIAGARA 
FALLS 

One of the natural wonders of the 
world. A charming place at any sea- 
son of the year, reached from every 
direction by the 

NEW YORK CENTRAL LINES 

A visit to the Falls is an object lesson 
in geography: an exhibition of land- 
scapes that no painter can equal, and a 
glimpse of the latest developments of 
the industrial world. 



A copy of Four-Track Series No. 9, "Two Days at 
Niagara Falls," will be sent free, postpaid, to any ad- 
dress on receipt of a two-cent postage stamp, by George 
H. Daniels, General Passenger Agent, New York Cen- 
tral & Hudson River Railroad, Grand Central Station 
New York. 



Vlll 



RECREATION. 



8 

t 
































#■■ 


















































V ' 


ft 


■ — 








!E:EA(I& 












11 
"ESiV " 


5 


u^^ 


















— — i 




1 -,. 

£5 Si 



PADDOCK 



Among all the wire fences made, there is not one that is a per- 
fect Paddock Fence. 

But, if you must really have a Paddock, and think that wire will 
answer, then we believe that our 20 or 25 Bar, 58-Inch Fence comes 
the nearest of all to being a Paddock Fence. 

It is closer woven, and has more real practical elasticity than any 
other make. 

Many horsemen use our 88-inch Buffalo Fence for paddocks, be- 
cause it keeps the animals' heads apart. 



BOX 39, ADRIAN, MICHIGAN. 



n 

% 

% 



• 



i 






PAGE WOVEN WIRE FENCE CO. | 






. 



No Picture 

can show you the good qualities of the Kenwood 
Sleeping Bag. You must see a complete combina- 
tion bag to understand how perfectly it is adapted to 
the use of every man who sleeps out of doors or in a 
tent, under all conditions of climate and weather. 

If your dealer does not have the Kenwood Sleep- 
ing Bag, write us for samples, prices and full informa- 
tion, then decide which quality you want and order it 
on approval. If it does not suit you in every way return 
it. We pay charges both ways. Don't buy any other 
sleeping bag or blankets before you have seen the 
Kenwood. 

THE KENWOOD MILLS 

ALBANY, N. Y. 



RECREATION. 



IX 



Special California Tours 



Cororvcxdo BecxeH 




Our personally-conducted excursions to 
California have been very successful. 

I am now organizing several similar parties for July and August. Will gladly 
send you full particulars of special advantages offered. Rates very low. Accom- 
modations excellent. The best California line will be used — the Santa Fe. Why 
not go this summer and enjoy Pacific Ocean breezes and snow-capped Sierras? 
En route see Grand Canyon of Arizona. An unusual opportunity — don't miss it. 
Write to W. J . Black, 13 12 Great Northern Building, Chicago, for full 
particulars and free copy of beautiful book about California. 



Santa Fe All the Way 




.... ^j0L^ 



-3 I 



'■.,< ■ ■ -■/% ■ 



VACATION DATS 

Where are you going for your vacation this summer, 
and how? 

There are many delightful places: Lake Chautauqua, 
St. Lawrence River, Adirondack and White Mountains, 
Atlantic Coast, Canada, Niagara Falls, South Shore of 
Lake Erie country, and its lovely Islands; lakes of the 
Northwest, Yellowstone country and Colorado places. 

The service of the Lake Shore C& Michigan Southern 
Railway — unequaled for completeness and comfort — 
may be used with greatest advantage for reaching 
all these summer places. 

Privileges — Enjoyable privileges accorded on tickets 
over Lake Shore — stop-over at Lake Chautauqua, 
Niagara Falls, Lake Erie Islands, option of boat or 
rail between Cleveland and Buffalo, etc. 

Summer Boohs— Sent for 6 cents postage by 
undersigned: "Lake Shore Tours," 
"> "Lake Chautauqua," "Quiet Sum- 
mer Retreats," "Privileges for Lake 
Shore Patrons," ' Book of Trains." 

Boston Excursions— Over 

the Lake Shore, July 2, 3, 4 and 5. 
Good until September 1. Very low 
rates. All railways sell in connec- 
tion with Lake Shore. 

Chautauqua Excursions 
—Over Lake Shore, July 3 and 24, 
from all points west of Cleveland. 
Good 30 days. Low rates. 

A. J SMITH, G. Po C& T. A., Cleveland, O. 




RECREATION. 



a 



NOTHING SO RARE AS RESTING ON AIR." 





"'• ! : • - ; - ;; -".'. ^ 


I?' eg | 




■ 


IHI^Bill 


' '-'" : -P'% '■'■ V ■': ■.: } '^W^ 




: : :.Jc : a 5; :: ;7S .: 5 ',. ; ,..:; : ,:^ 

wmBKm 

WsBm 


• 


t , 


'■'--mf'4$ : jA-^ : ' : '^S;::|Si>..- ■ : ;- ; - . . ..' ■■■■■■ 




:5:fS 


»;■■' 


i*- ^p 




Hr*lL.4 




'■ y/K>7->„.. 


Iff ? 


*- - - ^^^^^z. 


* -^ i ^^ K - iti ^^^Lii0g^^fKm^^^^^~~ ^_ __ 


Wk\ 


■■■■ -~ ■- ■- - .. ~ ....... .■ ~ ". 


s^aaaw^S 


— m __.™« ; ™. ^^^„^^..-^^_i^- i ^~^^^__ m £i^s^j^ iS ijg^. __^ 


- - - _ . - ■ • - - - , - . - . .- , ■•• - - ~~ 







TAKING MINE EASE. 



The only article in your outing outfit that you can use during the whole year is a 

Pneumatic Mattress 

OR CUSHION 



THE EVER PRESENT ROOT 

in the bed of boughs isathingof the past if you 
use a Pneumatic Mattress. A mattress for 
home use that you can deflate, pack in your 
grip and take with you into camp. 




SPRUCE BOUGHS 

may make a fine bed. But the genuine Sports- 
man prefers a Pneumatic Mattress because he 
knows he can do three times the tramping the 
day following a night's good sleep. 




Sportsman's Cushion 

A Yoke to save your shoulders 

A Swimming Collar for those 
who can't swim. 

A Life Preserver in case of 
accident. 

A Cushion while waiting for 
Moose. 

A Cushion or Head Rest while 
waiting for Duck. 

A Protection for your shoulder 
if the gun is heavy. 

A Cushion for CAMP, BOAT, 
OFFICE or HOME. 




PRICE $2.00 

Carry it in your Pocket, it weighs just One Pound. 

Swimming Collar. 

Worn around the neck, leaving the arms 
free for action. "Will support a full-grown 
man. Just the thing when learning to swim # 
Price, Small Size, $1.50 Large Size, $2.00 

Pneumatic Mattress 6 Cushion Company, 
2 R South Street, New York City. 




Swimming Collar. 



trttt 



itf 



RECREATION. 









TRAVELING 

in the Mo un tains 






llillilSl 



Sg-ito^' 



Ml 






illSiiiiSillSft 






xii RECREATION. 



i . . . . 




iooo Island Rouse 



In the midst of the "Thousand Islands," 
the so-called "Venice of America," and 
really the most charming and delight- 
ful Summer Resort on the Continent. 



Send me two 2-cent stamps and I will send you a beauti- 
fully illustrated guide book. Mention Recreation. 

O. G. STAPLES, Owner and Proprietor 



Alexandria Bay, % ¥♦ 



RECREATION. 



Xlll 




TrPiaLSCENE.MUSKpKAlAKVs 



■*k3g> 



R®YAL MUSKSKA" M2JE L,MU5K©K A LAK^ 

J'oe caisin«rhirt*«;ff CP ^t C e $ ort region it) Aroer»c&.\ . < 

/oflt fe et V»°%strSd 
el If n&y Fever &5scjrea 

d SpStive literature, rates, ro&bs, 
ir>f<^dlbn, o^Jy to 

LCGehT^SBY^dTdt.Ajent, ' 



ground 
above s 




XIV 



RECREATION. 



I 



"FOR 34 YEARS A STANDARD PIANO." 

The Wing Piano 



VHT T TMF"Fn THT^ "ROOTC IF YOU intend to buy a piano, a book 

IV/U L\iltLLLJ JLillO 5->KJ\Jx\. — not a catalogue— that gives you all the informa- 
tion possessed by experts. It makes the selection of a piano easy. If read carefully, it will make you 
a judge of tone, action, workmanship and finish ; will tell you how to know good from bad. It de- 
scribes the materials used ; gives pictures of all the different parts, and tells how they should be made 
and put together. It is the only book of its kind ever published. It contains 116 large pages, and is 
named "The Book of Complete Information About Pianos." We send it free to anyone wishing 
to buy a piano. Write for it. 

PATTC "PD/^TUF <ttnn TT\ <£Of\r\ We make the WING PIANO and sell it our- 
0/\.VrL rt\\J 1V1 4HUU 1 ^ $A\J\J selves. It goes direct from our factory to 
your home. We do not employ any agents or salesmen. When you buy the WING PIANO you pay 
the actual cost of construction and our small wholesale profit. This profit is small because we sell 
thousands of pianos yearly. Most retail stores sell no more than twelve to twenty pianos yearly, and 
must charge from f ioo to $200 profit on each. They can't help it. 




A Wing style — 45 other styles to select from. 

CTJKPT* /^fcrVT TDT AT WE PAY FREIGHT. NO MONEY INADVANCE. Wewill 
OHrN 1 KJLS 1 JxIr\J_/ send any WING PIANO to any part of the United States on 
trial. We pay freight in advance and do not ask for any advance payment or deposit. Jf the oiano is 
not satisfactory after twenty days' trial in your home, ive take it back entirely at our expense. You pay 
us nothing unless you keep the piano. There is absolutely no risk or expense to you. 

Old instruments taken in exchange. EASY MONTHLY PAYHENTS. 

INSTRUMENTAL ATTACHMENT fcEfifESSSJ £ffiSf 

the tones of the mandolin, guitar., harp, zither and banjo. 

IN 34 YEARS 33,000 PIANOS ZV,t;il«S^^f^%mo 

PIANOS are guaranteed for twelve years against any defect in tone, action, workmanship or material. 

W/rM/" 1 OT?f A MC Are just as carefully made as Wing Pianos. They have a sweet, 
W UN \J v^XvvJ/xlN O powerful, lasting tone, easy action, very handsome appearance, need 
no tuning. Wing Organs are sold direct from the factory, sent on trial ; are sold on easy monthly 
payments. For catalogue and prices write to 



WING & SON, 



226 and 228 East J2th St*, 
NEW YORK. 



1868— 35th Year-J903. 



RECREATION. 



xv 



n. 



I 



n 



OQ'v 



& 






tf 



c c 



FOR DOG WORMS ALWAYS USE 
SERGEANT'S 

SURE SHOT." 



That's the name POLK MILLER gives his remedy for freeing dogs from 
worms, — generally worms from puppies. 

Many finely bred dogs die before maturity when afflicted with worms. If 
they do not die, worms hold them back, destroy natural instincts, and 
often prevent the development of those qualities that ought to make pup- 
pies greater dogs than their parents. 

Like children afflicted with worms, the pup becomes inanimate, sickly 
and thin. 

Abnormal appetite that is bound to destroy the digestion and cause func- 
tional disorders which develop into chronic ailments are the result of 
worms. 

If sometimes they do not die, worms leave them no good and a disgrace 
to their breeding. 

Canine worms should be treated for immediately symptoms show. 
All the time "SURE SHOT" is destroying worms it is putting into splen- 
did condition the valuable pup patient. The pup will come out of his 
sickness with limpid eyes, keen sent, sleek coat, normal bone and mus- 
cle development. The following testimonial shows its efficacy. You 
may know the writer. 

Greenbrier, Ala. 
"Sergeant's Sure Shot" is the only thing I have ever used with success. 
It has saved more than one dog for me, and I never expect to lose a dog 
from worms so long as I can get it." WILLIAM M. HUNDLEY. 

SERGEANT'S SURE SHOT per bottle 50c. Sold by Druggists or 
Sporting Goods Dealers everywhere or mailed (prepaid) from 

POLK MILLER DRUG CO., 

.RICHMOND, VIRGINIA, BOX 217. 

There isn't anywhere a dog lover or owner, who wouldn't like to have 
our 48 page Treatise on Dogs. ; We will send it and a Pedigree Blank to 
any address for .3 cents in stamps which go to pay the postage. 



XVI 



RECREATION. 




lip 

y^ 



4 QUART 

WE PAY EXPRESS CHARGES 



THER GASE. 



We have one of the largest distilleries in the world. We are the largest bottlers 
of whiskey in the world. We have more whiskey in our eight Bonded Warehouses 
than any other distiller in the world. There is more HAYNER WHISKEY sold than any 
other brand in the world. We have been in business for over 37 years, serve regu- 
larly half-a-million satisfied customers and have a capital of $500,000.00 paid in full, 
so you run no risk when you deal with us. Don't forget that HAYNER WHISKEY goes 
direct from our own distillery to you, with all its original strength, richness and flavor, 
thus assuring you of absolute purity and saving you the enormous profits of the deal- 
ers. Don't forget that a HAYNER quart is an honest quart of 32 ounces, 4 to the gallon. 
It takes 5 of the ordinary "quarts" to make a gallon. We give one-fourth more in 
every bottle, reducing our price just that much. You get both quality and quantity 




Send us $1.00 for ONE QUART or $3.20 for FOUR QUARTS of HAYNER SEVEN-YEAR-OLD 

RYE, and we will pay the express charges. We ship in a plain, sealed package; 
no marks to even suggest contents. When the whiskey reaches your home, try 
it, sample it thoroughly. Then, if you don't find it all right, perfectly satisfactory 
in every way and better than you ever had before or can buy from anybody else 
at any price, ship it back to us at our expense and your money will be promptly 
refunded. We stand all the expense if you don't wish to keep the whiskey. YOU 
risk nothing. We ship one quart on your first or trial order only. All subse- 
quent orders must be for at least 4 quarts at 80 cents a quart. The packing 
and express charges are almost as much on one quart as on four and even at 
$1.00 for one quart we lose money, but we want you to try it. WE PREFER TO 
HAVE YOU ORDER FOUR QUARTS FOR $3.20 RIGHT NOW FOR THEN WE WILL MAKE A LITTLE 
PROFIT AND YOU WILL ALSO SAVE MONEY. But take your choice. $1.00 for 1 quart 
or $3.20 for 4 quarts, express prepaid. Your money back if you're not satisfied. 

Trial orders for Ariz., Cal., Col., Idaho, Mont., Nev., N. Mex., Ore., Utah., Wash., or Wyo] 
must be 1 Quart for $1.25 by EXPRESS REPAID. Subsequent orders on the basis of 4 QUARTS for 
$4.00 by EXPRESS PREPAID or 20;Quarts for $16.00 by FREIGHT PREPAID. 

Remit by Check, Bank Draft, Express or Money Order. It is unsafe to send currency 
unless you register your letter. Write our nearest office and do it NOW. 





SEVEN YEAR 00 



-^iSTlLLERSjr^ 



THE HAYNER DISTILLING COMPANY, 



DISTILLERY 
TROY, OHIO. 

DAYTON, OHIO. ST. LOUIS, MO., ST. PAUL, MINN., ATLANTA, GA., 



ESTABLISHED 
1866. 





wsmmBammmmmmssam 

BEN DOUBLED HIM UP INTO A WAD AND SENT HIM SPINNING. 



Volume XIX. 



RECREATION 

JULY, J903. 
G. 0. SHIELDS, (COQUINA) Editor and Manager 



Number \. 



BEN; THE STORY OF A CUB. 



W. H. WRIGHT. 




N the spring of 
1890 we went 
into the Bitter 
Root mount- 
ains to hunt 
bear. About 
the second day 
out we found 
a female black 
bear and 3 
cubs, that 
were only a 
few days old. 
We killed the 
mother and 
captured the 
children. We at once divided the 
latter among ourselves, Spencer tak- 
ing one. O'Brien one and I the other. 
O'Brien, whom I shall hereafter 
call Jack, because he does not deserve 
a better name, chose the female, the 
other 2 cubs being males. Spencer 
and I, of course, adopted a humane 
system of treatment for our pets, but 
O'Brien undertook to train his by 
cussing and beating it. The little girl 
rebelled at this from the start, and 
learned to hate her master violently, 
Fortunately for her, and for the peace 
of the camp, she h ed only a few 
weeks and never missed an opportun- 
ity to bite and claw her keeper 
viciously. It served him right ; for he 
was a cruel brute and we should have 
been glad if she had got him by the 
throat some night while he was asleep, 
and sent him over the divide. 

Her hatred of the biped freak 
was really picturesque, and at the 
same time pathetic. She would eat 
or drink but little and was weak and 
sickly all the time; but to the day of 
her death she managed, at frequent 




intervals, to get in her work on the 
Irishman. Not 10 minutes before she 
breathed her last she tried to bite him, 
and we were only sorry she did not 
succeed in getting a good hold. 

Spencer, though kind and careful 
of his charge, did not succeed in rais- 
ing the little cub. It lived about a 
month, and finally sickened and died. 
We fed them all on canned milk for 
a time, and my pet thrived on it. He 
became at once the life and joy of the 
camp. He learned to romp and play 
with us like a kitten or a puppy, and 




LISTENING. 



RECREATION. 




we taught him many amusing tricks. 
He was one of the most interesting 
pets and apt pupils I ever undertook 
to train, and I have owned and trained 
many. 

Occasionally Ben and his brother 
would fall out and have a scrap. They 
would stand up and spar like trained 
pugilists, until one would seem to 



horses in the outfit, and in the morn- 
ing, when we were ready to pack, 
one of us would bring them in from 
the feeding ground. Ben's was a little 
white pony, named Pard. As soon as 
Ben saw him coming, he would begin 
to squall and start for his mount. He 
would take his place beside the horse, 
and was all impatience while we were 





A FAMILY SCRAP. 



get a temporary advantage of the 
other. Then they would clinch, claw, 
bite and scratch like cats, and we 
would have to separate them, even 
though the trouble came at dead of 
night. 

We built Ben a cage of willow 
boughs, woven together, in which he 
was to ride during the day. We were 
on the march most of the time, and 
within a week from the day we 
caught Ben, and named him, he learn- 
ed to know his horse. We had 8 



packing. He knew when the load was 
being put on his horse as well as we 
did, and would dance around him, 
pawing his legs, jumping at his nose 
and otherwise expressing his delight, 
just as a dog would. When the 
lash rope, was finally made fast, and 
the cage tied on top of the pack, we 
would boost Ben up and put him in. 
He would express his delight by 
whimpering and cooing to us and 
to the horse, and dancing about in 
the cage. He soon got tired of this 



BEN; THE STORY OF A CUB. 



5 




rf\ Tj, 



confinement, however, and went to 
biting his cage and tearing it to 
pieces with his claws. It withstood 
this only a day or 2, and after that 
we simply put a collar and a dog 
chain on the little chap. We would 
fasten the other end of the chain to 
the pack, and the bear would sit on 
the load and ride as gracefully as a 
circus monkey. He soon learned to 
vary the monotony of his daily ride 
by taking hold of the chain with one 
paw a little above his neck, dropping 
off the load and swinging about the 
horse's legs. At first Pard, the pony, 
objected to this, and would buck and 
kick and dance ; but he gradually 
made up his mind that this was use- 



less, and thereafter was patient under 
all kinds of scratching and biting 
which the little imp saw fit to inflict 
on him. Finally Ben would hang on 
to his chain with one foot and would 
apparently go to sleep, dangling 
against the horse's legs as he walked 
or cantered along the rail. 

In the course of the next 2 or 3 
weeks we killed several other bears, 
and finally had 14 bear skins in the 
outfit. When we would get into camp 
we would spread these out, to con- 
tinue the drying process. Every time 
they were thrown out, and as soon as 
Ben was released from the load, he 
would go hunting among them, and 
within a few minutes would find the 





GOOD MORNING, PARD. 



RECREATION. 




SPRINTING FOR COVER. 



skin of his mother. It was truly pa- 
thetic to note the little fellow's grief 
at this. He would smell of the skin, 
lie down on it, put his nose between 
his feet and cry like a baby. Then 
he would get up and walk around 
it, nose it and caress it with his paws, 
and apparently try to wake his moth- 
er into life. The ordeal was so try- 
ing to him and to us that we finally 
quit opening this skin when we got 
into camp. We rolled it up tightly in 
heavy canvas and as soon as we 
reached camp we put it up in some 
tree where Ben could not find it. 
Still, he would search through the 
skins for his mother, and eventually 
we had to keep them all out of his 
sight. 1 have never seen, in all my 
study of wild animals, anything half 
so touching or so heartrending as 
Ben's grief for his dead mother. 
When Ben was about a month old, 



we killed a moose. We threw the 
green skin over one of the packs, for 
a few days, with the flesh side up. 
It dried in the shape of the pack, 
which, as you know, is an oval. One 
night we threw this off carelessly, 
and it lit with the edges on the ground 
forming a complete house, or tent, 
so to speak. When Ben was taken 
off his horse he found this, raised 
one end, crawled under, and from that 
day to the time when we completed 
our trip, late in the fall, the moose 
skin was his tent. He knew it, and 
apparently became as much at home 
under it as any of us in our tents. 
If any unusual disturbance were 
made about camp, if a dog barked, 
or if a short were fired, if a horse 
neighed, or if any one of us, or a 
stranger, came suddenly into camp, 
Ben would make a dive for his tent, 
grab one end of it with a forefoot, 



BEN; THE STORY OE A CUB. 



hoist it, and shoot under as if he 
had been fired from a gun ; and there 
he would stay until the trouble was 
over. Occasionally he would stick 
his head out from under his shelter, 
look carefully about the camp and lis- 
ten. When assured there was no fur- 
ther danger, he would come out and 
resume his play, or feeding - , or what- 
ever he might have to do. 



or high bush huckleberries, or any- 
thing such ground might furnish. He 
would occasionally dig up a bulbous 
plant of some kind and eat the root ; 
and we never knew him to dig up a 
plant that did not have an edible root. 
He knew from the first, much better 
than we did, what plants grew his 
favorite breakfast. 
It is evidently the habit of mother 




RUSTLING FOR BREAKFAST. 



As I have said, he was only a few 
days old when we got him, but from 
the start he seemed to know what kind 
of food bears live on, how to find it, 
and how to go about getting it. 
When he was a month old, and began 
to eat solid food, if we camped on a 
hillside where huckleberries or rose 
bushes grew, he would go foraging 
among them. When he found a bush 
of the kind that bore fruit to his lik- 
ing, he would bend it down and ex- 
amine it, and he never, from the first, 
pulled down any bush that does not, 
in season, bear fruit of some kind. 
If we camped near a swamp he would 
go into this and hunt for cranberries, 



bears to feed their young at frequent 
intervals, at least during the night. 
Ben seemed to know this. Further- 
more, he was blessed with a ravenous 
appetite and a rapid digestion. We 
would feed him as soon as we got in 
camp, and before we had our supper. 
Then we would feed him again before 
we went to bed. By the time we had 
slept an hour or 2, Ben's second sup- 
per would seem to be digested and 
he would get hungry and set up a 
howl. Someone would have to crawl 
out and feed him. Then he would 
curl up in his gunny sack and go to 
sleep. We hit on a plan of wrapping 
him up in the gunny sack, hoping 



8 



RECREATION. 




WAITING FOR IT TO COOL. 



this would keep him quiet until morn- 
ing. Not a bit of it. He would get 
hungry all the same and dig out of 
his swaddling cloth. He would come 
whining and crying around in the 
tent, and there was no rest for any of 
us until he had had a lunch. The boys 
gave vent to a great deal of profan- 
ity about these frequent interruptions 
of their slumbers, but they were so 
fond of little Ben that none of us 
would for a moment entertain a 
proposition either to kill him or to 
leave him in the woods ; so we kept 
our nursery running day and night, 
even if we had to work overtime. 

While Ben was in his infancy, and 
was being fed on spoon victuals, we 
would sometimes make a gravy of 
milk and flour, and add perhaps a 
little bacon grease, or something else 
we thought he might like, and with- 
in 3 days after we commenced to pre- 
pare such food, he learned to recog- 
nize the frying pan when he saw it 
taken out. When one of us would 
pick it up and start for the fire, he 



would squall and follow us. He would 
scramble over us, stand up on his 
hind feet and watch the proceedings 
as impatiently as a child would watch 
the preparation of its breakfast. When 
the mess was cooked he was at first 
eager to jump into it, but he soon 
learned it must first cool before he 
could eat it. Then he would sit by 
the frying pan and lick his chops, 
whine, and dig up the ground around 
it in impatience. Occasionally he 
would feel of it with his paw to see 
if the mess was cool enough to eat. As 
soon as it reached a temperature that 
was safe for him, he would put his feet 
on the edge of the frying pan, chuck 
his nose in, drink and lap as long as 
he could hold his breath. Then he 
would stop, and after a moment of 
breathing, would sail in again. 

As soon as Ben was old enough 
so we thought his stomach would 
stand it, we gave him pieces of fresh 
meat and bacon. At first we cooked 
it for him, then we gave him a taste 
of it in the raw state. He seemed to 



BEN; THE STORY OF A CUB. 



know what his mother would have 
preferred if she had been with him, 
and formed his taste accordingly. Af- 
ter a few days of this process of feed- 
ing, he would not taste cooked meat, 
unless half starved. He wanted it 
raw, and from that time we did not 
dare leave any fresh meat within his 
reach, except such as we wanted him 
to have. We had to hang the venison, 
the birds and the fresh fish in trees. 
Then we taught Ben to turn somer- 



hill. He would make perhaps half a 
dozen turns, and then stop and look 
up, as much as to say : 

"Is that enough?" 

If I said : 

"No, go ahead," he would double 
up and away he would go again. 
When I said, 

"All right," he would come for the 
mess table. Finally, as soon as I 
would pick up the frying pan and 
start for the fire, he would begin 




ft 



PLAYING CIRCUS FOR JERRY. 

saults. He took to these circus an- turning somersaults ; and perhaps ev- 

tics readily, and thereafter whenever ery 3 minutes during the cooking pro- 

his meal was ready, I would say to cess he would spin a few, and then 

™ : T look up to see if I were ready for 

Now, Ben, turn a somersault and him. 

you may have your breakfast." Sometimes when going through 

. Immediately he would double up brushy country we would put Ben in 

like a ball and go rolling down the a gunny sack and tie this on the pack. 

One evening when we struck camp 
and were throwing off the packs, Jer- 
ry Johnson, an old trapper, came 
around. After the usual greetings 
he was looking about camp and saw 
the gunny sack showing evidence of 
internal life. He asked me what was 
in it. I told him a cub. He said, 
"May I see it ?" 




10 



RECREATION. 



I said, 

"Yes, just open the sack and dump 
him out." 

Ben seemed to have his mind al- 
ready on the price of his supper, for 
when the old fellow dumped him out 
on the slope of a hill, Ben turned per- 
haps 20 somersaults before he un- 
curled. The old prospector laughed 
until he almost broke his suspenders. 

One day after Ben had grown to be 
about 2 months old, we were crossing 
a bad washout when Pard and an- 
other horse fell and lay with their 
feet upward. Of course there was 
the usual commotion and anxiety to 
save the horses and the packs. We 
all jumped for the 2 unfortunates, 
loosened the cinches, got the horses 
on their feet as soon as possible, and 




LOOKING OVER THE CAMP GROUND. 

then commenced to dig out the packs. 

Up to that time no one had thought 
of Ben, but when Pard's last pack was 
rescued from the mud, Spencer said, 

"Here's poor little Ben" ; and tak- 
ing him by the hind feet, pulled him 
out, covered with mud, and looking as 
thoroughly disreputable as any cub 
ever could look, but really none the 
worse for his adventure. 

Ben kept on growing, of course, 



and within a few weeks he could 
reach the cinch which held Pard's load 
on. When that time arrived, he would 
no longer wait to be helped up, but 
when he found the load was about 
completed, he would stand up, place 
his left foot on the horse's forelegs, 
grab the cinch with the right, and then 
climb to the top of the pack. 

Ben could beat any watch dog I 
ever saw at seeing, scenting or hear- 
ing people. 

If one of us was away from camp, 
and was returning, those in camp 
were always warned of the approach 
by Ben, long before the men could 
hear a sound. No matter how busy 
he might be, eating or playing or 
howling for food, all at once he would 
stop and stand like a graven image 
for a few seconds, listening, looking 
and pointing his ears in some certain 
direction. Then he would stand up 
on his hind feet and look and listen. 
By and by he would conclude that 
the danger was too great for him to 
risk his precious body any longer in 
sight, would go for his moosehide 
tent, grab one end and shoot under 
it. Perhaps 5 or 10 minutes later we 
would see or hear some member of 
our party, or possibly some stranger, 
coming up the trail. 

Frequently when we had all been 
away from camp, Spencer and I would 
try to sneak to camp and surprise 
Ben. We were both old hunters and 
are vain enough to imagine we are 
good stalkers, but never, in the course 
of the entire summer, were we able 
to get in sight of the camp without 
Ben's knowing of our approach long 
before he could see us. We have 
crawled on our hands and knees, in 
the stealthiest manner possible to 
the top of the nearest ledge, or behind 
some big log or rock that concealed 
us entirely from the camp, perhaps 
200 yards away. When we reached 
our final hiding place, and raised our 
heads carefully, we would see one of 
Ben's ears poked out at us from be- 
hind a tree, or from under the edge of 



BEN; THE STORY OF A CUB. 



ii 



his tent. Our efforts to stalk him 
took the conceit out of us completely. 
On one occasion we were camping 
on a trout stream. Ben was sunning 
himself on a gunny sack near the tent 
apparently sound asleep. Suddenly 
he jumped, looked up the creek, 
stood up, listened some more, then 
circled about the camp, sniffing the 
air and occasionally stopping to lis- 
ten. He kept this up 10 or 15 min- 
utes. Then he sought the seclusion 
of his moosehide tent. We kept lis- 
tening and looking up the creek, but 
during all that time we could see 
nothing, nor could we hear anything 
but the roar of the water. Half an 
hour after Ben gave the first alarm, 
a man came in sight, fishing down 
the creek. Then we knew what had 
been troubling the cub all that time. 
Ben liked Spencer very well, but 
always hated the Irishman. He was 
especially fond of me, naturally, be- 
cause I fed him and cared for him 
more than Spencer did. If I lay down 
in camp during the day, Ben would 
immediately come and cuddle up be- 
side me, laying his head on my arm. 
He would sleep as soundly as I 
did for any length of time if all went 
well; but if he heard any unusual 
noise, or if the breeze brought a sus- 
picious scent to camp, Ben would jump 
as if someone had prodded him with a 
sharp stick. His sudden awakening 
would, of course, arouse me, and in 
almost every instance someone would 
come into camp ; or perhaps we would 
hear an elk or a deer passing through 
the brush somewhere within 100 or 
200 yards of camp. 

We returned home in September. 
Ben was by that time a lusty cub, and 
while the family immediately learned 
to love him, he was a great trial to 
us all. We turned him loose in the 
house, and he seemed to think he 
could run through it just as he did 
about the camp. He would play with 
the children as a puppy would, chas- 
ing them from room to room ; and in 
his eagerness would upset chairs, ta- 



bles, or any other furniture that came 
in his way. Two or 3 times when the 
table was spread for a meal he grabbed 
the cover, yanked it off and smashed 
the china to bits. He seemed not to 
care a blank for expense. 

I gave Ben an old piece of garden 
hose, about 10 feet long, to play with. 
He seemed to take great delight in 
shaking it, just as a puppy would, and 
often amused himself in this way for 
an hour at a time. Occasionally I 
would get hold of one end of it, put 
it to my mouth and shout at him 
through it, calling him by name. He 
would stop and look about until he 
found that the noise came from the 
end of it nearest to him. He would 







BEN S PRIVATE TELEPHONE LINE. 

then take this up, put it to his ear, 
and listen carefully. Placing my end 
of the hose to my mouth I would 
again shout, Ben. He would listen 
intently, look down along the outside 
of the hose, and then sitting up on 
his haunches, would hold up the end 
of the hose to one eye and look into 
it as if he thought I were inside of it, 
and as if he were trying to find 
me. 

He tried to cultivate the acquaint- 
ance of the cat, but it was shy of him. 
His greatest ambition was to catch 
it and play with it, but it was afraid 
of him from the start, and they had 
some terrific races through the house. 
Long says wild animals do not know 



12 



RECREATION. 



anything only what their mothers 
teach them ; but he is away off the 
trail. When the cold winds of Octo- 
ber began to blow Ben knew it was 
time to get ready for winter, though 
his mother died when he was 2 weeks 
old. He dug a big hole under the 
floor of the woodshed and carried into 
it all the old clothes, rags, shavings 
and straw he could get hold of. In 
3 days he had a good, warm place to 
hibernate, but the poor cub never got 
to occupy it. 

The boys taught Ben to lie on his 
back and play with a football or a 
small keg, as you have seen a juggler 
do in a circus. The cub was as fond 



back fence, pulled the staple from the 
barn door and went in to have some 
fun with Ben. He had grown to be a 
big bear by that time, yet the boy3 
thought it would be perfectly safe to 
play circus with him as before. Ben 
was always ready for anything, and 
gave them a warm welcome. I learned 
the particulars of the interview on the 
installment plan. One boy told me 
a part of it, then another boy told 
another part, and thus it all came out, 
It seems that at first one of the boys 
got on Ben to take a ride. This was 
all right, and Ben raced around the 
barn floor with him, a la circus ring. 
Then 2 of the boys got on. That was 




SOLID COMFORT. 



of this kind of sport as the boys were, 
and would keep a football in the air 
20 minutes without letting it touch 
the floor. 

Finally Ben got too big for the 
house. At times he would depart from 
the gentle ways of his childhood and 
become decidedly rough in his play, so 
we had to relegate him to the barn at 
the foot of the lot. I kept the door of 
this barn securely locked, and would 
not allow anyone to go in unless I 
were there to chaperon the visitor. 

All the boys in town had, of 
course, cultivated Ben's acquaintance 
before he got so big, and they still 
longed to romp with him. One Sun- 
day afternoon when we were all away 
a dozen of these boys met at my house 
and finding it vacant climbed over the 



all right, too, and Ben gave them a 
lively whirl. Then 3 got on. Ben 
was faithful to his training, and spun 
around the ring a few times with the 
trio. He finally got tired of that, con- 
cluded they were rather rubbing it in, 
and that he would change the feed on 
them. Suddenly he dropped on his 
back and commenced to play foot- 
ball with the boys. Two of them es- 
caped, but the third was not so for- 
tunate. Ben seemed to have doubled 
him up into a ring, a ball, or 
something of that kind, and set him 
spinning in the air. He kept that up 
until the other boys thought their pal 
was being torn to pieces, when they all 
rushed in and rescued him. They 
then went out of the barn with all 
possible speed. 



BEN; THE STORY OE A CUB. 



13 



The boy who had been the football, 
was a sight for the gods. His clothes 
were torn to ribbons and most of them 
stripped off him. His legs, arms, 
back and head were clawed and 
scratched and the blood was running 
from him in at least 50 streams. The 
yells and shrieks of the boys had 
brought a crowd of the neighbors. 
The victim was hustled into the near- 
est house, a doctor was called and the 
boy was sewed up, bandaged, bathed 
in arnica and put to bed. In the course 
of 3 weeks he was able to walk about, 
but it was nearly 6 weeks before he 
was fit to appear in company again. 
His father, meantime, had a big doc- 
tor's bill to pay, besides buying the 
boy a new suit of clothes. 

Naturally, the old man was indig- 
nant. It happened that he was a bad 
man, and had confided to certain of 
his neighbors that he had killed a man 
some years before, in the mines. As 
soon as he learned of the damage to 
his young hopeful he said he would 
kill the bear and if the owner made 
any objection he might share the same 
fate. When I returned home that 
evening I went to see the boy, and 
several of the neighbors came in to 
see me. The affair was, of course, 
the talk of the town for weeks. With- 
in a day or 2 after the accident, the 
old man called on me and ordered me 
peremptorily to kill the bear. I said 
I did not think I would. Then he 
said, 

"If you don't kill him, I will." I 
said, 

"I don't think." 

Fortunately, I am bigger than the 
old man, and younger, so he did not 
think it best to carry out his early 



threat in the matter. He looked up a 
policeman and tried to get him to kill 
tne bear. The officer declined. Then 
the old man called on a justice of the 
peace and asked for a warrant for my 
arrest. The justice asked him some 
questions, and after investigating the 
matter carefully, declined to* issue a 
warrant. He, however, sent for me 
privately, and I called on him. He 
asked me to tell him all about the af- 
fair, and I did so. He asked me if 
the bear had been off my premises at 
any time, and I said, 

"No, not since I brought him to 
town." I then told him I had at first 
kept Ben in the house and since he 
outgrew that, had kept him in the 
barn, with the door securely locked; 
that the boys had gone to the barn, 
broken into it, and had met their Wa- 
terloo. The judge said he could not 
see that I was to blame in any way, 
and that if the father of the young 
hoodlum made any further threats 
against me, to come to him, and he 
would issue a warrant for his arrest ; 
so the football match rested there. 

I realized, however, that Ben had 
outgrown my town lot, and that I 
must part with him. I dreaded this 
ordeal for I had grown extremely 
fond of him ; but I was not prepared 
to establish a zoological garden or to 
build a bear den. It happened that a 
circus visited the town within 2 or 3 
weeks after the football game, so I 
called on the manager, and asked him 
if he did not want a black bear. At 
first he said no, but when I offered to 
give him one, he said that was differ- 
ent ; so I led Ben down, consigned him 
to the animal keeper, bade him an 
affectionate farewell, and I trust he is 
still alive and happy. 





A THRILLING LEAP. 

(Land Locked Salmon) 



FROM OIL PAIh|T|f*Q PY W, U. STEWARD. 



THE BREAD OE IDLENESS. 



ROBERT P. LOWRY. 



Easily and lightly our canoe glided down 
the gleaming Susquehanna, as our eyes 
traversed the banks in search of a camp 
site. A dancing line of white water ahead 
abruptly terminated our search. The canoe 
yielded to the quickening current and 
awakened to new life. Not to have shot a 
rapid is almost not to have lived ; and he 
who has never known the mad, wild joy 
of it is fortunate only in that the future 
holds so rare a delight for him.. Through 
the deep, swift water, down the triangular 
tongue at the beginning of the riffles and 
onward between great rocks, whose pres- 
ence was made evident only by a foamy 
backwash, our boat, guided by the steady 
arm of Red and Blue, sped like a flushed 



town, at the head of the river, to that place; 
and there our river adventures were des- 
tined to end, for the rocky bottom of the 
shallow river had completely worn the can- 
vas off the bottom of our canoe. 

We entered on a quiet, uncolored man- 
ner of living such as is attained only by 
great philosophers, tramps and a few camp- 
ers. The gospel of this state is content- 
ment. To be at peace with all the world; 
to banish dreary cares ; to have the wan- 
derlust silenced by long, hard days of 
paddling; that is to dwell in Arcadia. 

Sometimes the man that owned the farm 
on which we were located honored us with 
a visit. Another welcome guest was his 
helper, Gus. He was innocent of the 3 




ON THE SUSQUEHANNA. 



AMATEUR PHOTO BY LEWIS E. THEISS. 



quail. A sudden bend of the river to the 
left and we found ourselves in the place 
we had been seeking. 

A huge chestnut tree rose a few rods 
from the bank, overshadowing a wide 
stretch of grassy meadow. Under 
its branches we pitched our tent. In the 
farm house, near, the good dame freely 
gave us permission to camp on her hus- 
band's land ; but the sight of our bare, 
sunburned arms stirred the mother in her. 
She recommended cold cream, and related 
warningly a story of a little boy who came 
to his death through sunburn. Our camp 
lay in a narrow, basin-shaped valley divid- 
ed by the North branch of tke Susque- 
hanna. On the opposite side of the river 
was the town of Windsor. A week of 
canoe cruising had taken us from Coopers- 



R's and he had had to work hard all his 
life. His sole diversion had been, so he 
declared, an occasional fishing trip; but 
he was good natured and clever. 

Sometimes the boys from the town swam 
the river and came unashamed up to the 
tent. To these we let it be known that our 
canoe was for sale. Not that we really 
wished to part with our alternate servant 
and mistress, but to see a horny handed 
tiller of the soil in that varium et mutabile, 
canoe of ours was ever our desire. 

To the inhabitants of the hamlet across 
the river we were a mystery. The brown 
trousered tramps with the gray flannel 
shirts who, according to their own state- 
ment, were not fishing, and who bought 
food at the store in place of soliciting 
"hand-outs" at the back doors, were phe- 



15 



i6 



RECREATION. 



nomena for which even the most imagina- 
tive of the gossips failed to account. 

We swam in the afternoons, and once we 
went fishing. This last step we took only 
after much deliberation. It was a bit 
strenuous to harmonize with our manner 
of living; but half a day spent by the 
river's brink, rod in hand, resulted in a 
considerable string of bass and sunfish. 

Our ears were charmed by the song spar- 
row's matins and vespers ; our eyes were 
delighted by the sunset light on the water, 



and the afterglow that clung lovingly to the 
hills. We were content to loaf and dream 
and smoke by the stream ; and if the rain 
gently falling on the tent was our slumber 
song, it troubled not the peace of our souls. 
Even golden days are not immortal. The 
time came when we had to leave our happy 
valley; yet in spirit we often and fondly 
return to that lotus land, where an earth- 
ly Lethe went on its sparkling way past our 
habitation, and where we ate and found 
sweet the bread of idleness. 




AMATEUR PHOTO BV J, BAUER 

CHIPMUNK. 
One of the 1 6th Prize Winners in Recreation's 7th Annual Photo Competition. 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY J. BAUER. 

RED SQUIRREL. 

One of the 16th Prize Winners in Recreation's 

7th Annual Photo Competition. 



AMATEUR PHOTO BY A L. PRINCEHORN. 



ROBIN AT NEST. 

One of the 14th Prize Winners in Recreation's 

7th Annual Photo Competition. 



PHOTOGRAPHING IN THE MORO COUNTRY. 



GEO. D 
Photos by 

In the island of Mindanao, the Moro 
Mohammedan tribes, numbering hundreds 
of thousands, were invincible. Previous to 
the expedition of American troops which 
penetrated to the heart of the island in 
April, May, June and July, 1902, white man 
had never ventured there. General Wey- 
ler and his regiment reached the Lake 
Lanoa regions of Mindanao about 3 years 
ago, to attempt to pacify the unruly Moros, 
but he did not remain long; and so it has 
been with all others who have tried to force 
a passage into the interior. The fierce fight- 




RICE. 

the Author. 

gave out I went among the thousand or 
more soldiers, offering fabulous values for 
one or more films, but only 2 or 3 men had 
cameras and they were down to the last film. 
Campaigning, with the enemy firing at 
night, with short rations, long marches, 
and in heavy rains, is not conducive to good 
photography. I secured some excellent 
views of the capture of stockades, of the 
blowing up of fortifications, and the like, 
and carried those films inside my shirt ; 
but the penetrating rain soaked me through 
night after night ; and later, when I turned 
my films over to a photographer for print- 
ing, he informed me that they had been re- 
duced to pulp by the wet. The next time 
I go on an expedition of that sort I shall 
carry my camera outfit in a waterproof 
case. This is easy to say, but when on the 
march in the enemy's country, one drops 
everything but his canteen. When a sok.ier 
gives up all his personal comfort so he 
shall not fall back of the column and into 
the hands of the foe, he is quite sure to 
drop his extra weights in parcels ; yet in 
this struggle of a 3 or 4 months' cam- 
paign I know of only one camera being 
abandoned, and that was partly because it 
got wet and warped. 



NATIVE SOLDIERS, 

ing warriors of the Moro tribes were ag- 
gressive and destructive to life and prop- 
erty. It was decided to punish them, and 
the column was formed under Colonel 
Baldwin which finally made things peace- 
ful in the lake sections of Mindanao. I 
was with the Baldwin expedition. We 
captured Moro fort after fort and destroyed 
their works and barricades. May 2nd, the 
great fight of Bayan, in which we lost 2 
officers killed, 8 enlisted men killed, 3 of- 
ficers wounded and some 55 soldiers 
wounded, finished the Moro army. Since 
then it has been content to let our sentries 
alone and cease stealing our horses and 
properties. The result is that the man be- 
hind the camera can go where he pleases. 

Why did I not get some views of the 
battles? One can not carry much on a 
horse, and when hiking it is all a man can 
do to carry his shelter half and roll. We 
were often short of everything, there were 
long marches, there was no wagon trans- 
portation, and often the mule pack trains 
were far in the rear. Yes, I had my 
camera and a supply of films, but not 
nearly enough. When the first lot of films 




NATIVE BATHING GOWNS. 

I am preparting for the next campaign in 
the wet, where I may have to lie on the 
ground with a shelter half over me and get 
thoroughly wet before sunrise next day. A 
native is making me a waterproof case 
which will hold my folding Kodak and 
about a dozen films. This case will fas- 
ten tight to my side, at the waist, where it 
will not interfere with haversack or can- 
teen. 

The army ought to have more photog- 



17 



i8 



RECREATION. 



raphers. There was a time when the pho- 
tographer was ridiculed, but not so now. 
Those who had cameras in that campaign 
were requested by officers and enlisted men 
alike to provide copies of all views at any 
cost. I enjoyed taking views more than 
I ever enjoyed anything else. The fact 
that I had a camera made the campaign 
like a big holiday to me. It drove the 
blues from me completely, relieving the 
monotony, even though many of the films 
were spoiled. 

A campaigner can make considerable 
money with his camera in these foreign 
lands if he secures the right views and re- 
tails them to his friends. I like to give 
my comrades prints of their camps, iheii 
fights, and the like, at cost, but these liberal 
and independent fellows will not let me. 
I say to a soldier friend, "Here is a view I 
took, and I see that you are in it. You 
may have a print at the cost price, perhaps 
10 cents." He delightedly accepts a print, 
but insists that I take 25 cents for it. I do 
not like to take money from my comrades, 
but they make me. 

The natives also like the views. They 
do not concern themselves about the price. 
You can gracefully present a print to a 
native, say of his house, with himself 
seated in front, and his family in the back- 
ground. He receives the view with a 
grunt and a smile, the little ones play with 
it and soil it, and you think your generos- 
ity has gone to waste; but by and by this 
native comes to your quarters with a parcel. 
You open the parcel and it contains for you 
a present of a bolo, a spear, or some relic 
that you value at many dollars. 




UNDER THE BAMBOO TREE. 

The natives are amusing. Few of them 
are unaware what the photographer is do- 
ing when he snaps them. By instinct they 
know, if not otherwise. The women hide 
their faces if in working attire, but if in 
Sunday togs they proudly pose for the 
view and are pleased if they are snapped 
several times, although they may never ex- 
pect to see the prints. Moro women have 
often kept me waiting a long time at the 
door until they arranged themselves for be- 
ing pictured in American costumes. They 
will give you no peace until you have the 
film developed and give them a print. Then 
they have great sport over it. They ridicule 
the size of one another's mouths and the 
like, and it is worth dollars to hear them. 
Soldiers and others who wish to make life 
worth living while serving with a regiment 
should take their cameras with them. 



A PLACE JUST EAST OF PERSIA. 

A. L. VERMILYA. 



Ship me some place East of Persia, where 
no callow writers dwell, 

Where no bloomin' poetasters stupid tales 
in verses tell ; 

Where the editors are cranky, and all manu- 
scripts decline 

That have in their addled make-up even one 
poetic line. 

For I'm tired of all this rubbish — tired as 

ever I can be — 
When I ope my Recreation, this is what 

I'm sure to see : 
"There's a place a mile from Kansas, that 

is most divinely fair, 
Where the Indians are peaceful, and will 

let you keep your hair." 

Ship me some place East of Persia, where 
they shoot the writer man, 

Where they pitch the budding poet from the 
desert caravan; 



For it gives me indigestion, cholera, and 

fits, sometimes, 
When these mushy, gushing scribblers split 

themselves in bummy rhymes. 

And when my short hike is over and my 

spirit sails away, 
Plant me somewhere, I beseech you, where 

no spiffling bards can stray ; 
Where no magazines are published, and no 

unfledged rhymesters peep, 
There amid great hunks of silence let me 

take my dreamless sleep. 

"Hold on, Quaker, stop your kicking!" this 

I say unto myself, 
As I lay my pen and tablet thoughtfully 

upon the shelf; 
"Though these poets in their frenzy write 

some most atrocious verse, 
It is evident as can be that my rhymes are 

even worse." 



THE HAWK BOUNTY QUESTION. 



J. E. TYLOK. 



In December Recreation Mr. W. T. 
Hornaday gave some valuable advice relat- 
ing to the hawk bounty subject. Those 
who advocate such a policy, hoping thereby 
to exterminate hawks and owls, should read 
what this eminent authority has to say. 
Mr. Hornaday does not indulge in specu- 
lation when he advocates the protection 
rather than the destruction of certain 
hawks and owls. On the contrary, the 
matter having been scientifically investi- 



all counted alike. This spirit of destruc- 
tion even extended to the fish hawk and its 
nest of young; until it cost the taxpayers 
many thousands of dollars and the law had 
to be repealed or the county become bank- 
rupt. 

Last spring I visited a nest of the barred 
owl. It contained 2 young birds a few 
days old and one spoiled egg. There was 
also in the nest a bountiful supply of pro- 
visions for the rapacious appetites of the 




AIVATEUR PHOTO BY J. E. TYICR 



YOUNG BARRED OWLS AND THEIR MORNING BREAKFAST. 



gated, no longer stands on theory, but on 
established fact; the final judgment being to 
kill the Cooper hawk and the sharp shinned, 
but to regard the others, generally speaking, 
as more beneficial than destructive. 

In Talbot county, Maryland, several 
years ago, a bounty of 50 cents was paid for 
every hawk and owl head, regardless of 
kind. School boys searched the orchards 
for hollow trees wherein the little screech 
owl might dwell, and before taking the life 
of the parent bird, frequently waited for the 
eggs to hatch, that the whole family might 
be sacrificed, as little heads and big heads 



young birds. These consisted of a grey 
squirrel, with its head eaten off; 4 field 
mice, 2 being partly devoured ; one wood 
rat, head eaten off; and 2 garden moles. 
These I photographed, and though unfortu- 
nately I did not secure a satisfactory nega- 
tive, nevertheless it gives a truthful bill of 
fare. The squirrel was still warm, while 
the 7 rodents were freshly killed. If that 
represents one meal, how many pests will a 
pair of adult owls destroy in a year? 

I submit the enclosed picture as some evi- 
dence, at least, that the barred owl has a. 
just claim for friendly consideration. 



Pallette — De Auber is an odd genius. 
Brushly — What's he up to now? 
Pallette — He is painting a $300 portrait 
of a 30-cent man. — Chicago News, 
19 




20 



WITH A PEELED POLE. 



FREDERIC RIGELOW. 



Over the lapse of years I can vividly re- 
call my first experience in trout fishing. 
Nothing in the past has so deeply rooted 
itself in my memory. Even the remem- 
brance of the boyhood times when I had 
to hoe corn or to pick up potatoes on pleas- 
ant days, or to saw wood in the shed, or to 
sprout potatoes in the damp cellar on rainy 
days, has nearly faded; but my youthful 
fishing days are still fresh in my memory. 

It was in early June when my uncle per- 
mitted me to accompany him trout fishing 
for the first time. The trees were in leaf, 
the violets in bloom, and all nature was 
rushing forth to meet summer. As we 
were to go before sunrise of the next day, 
I was sent early to bed so as to be ready 
for the morning walk to Long Lake creek, 
the favorite trout stream of the neighbor- 
hood. How long it took me to go to sleep 
that evening ! When finally I did, I 
dreamed all night of the trout I was to 
catch on the morrow. 

I was a small, freckle-faced lad, full of 
hope and wonder. I wore an old straw 
hat, well ventilated, a calico shirt, a 
pair of homemade trousers, and went 
barefooted. To wear shoes and stockings 
during the warm weather was the surest 
and quickest way for a boy to lose his so- 
cial standing among the other boys. With 
this apparel it took me about as long to 
dress as it did to repeat twice 2. 

The tackle I possessed would make a boy 
of today smile. Jointed rods, automatic 
reels, landing nets, and gorgeous flies of 
many kinds and colors were unknown to a 
boy of my time. My tackle was simple 
and strong ; everything was homemade ex- 
cept the hook and line. My rod was a 
peeled ironwood pole, cut from the forest ; 
the line, of white cotton, was little less 
than a rope in size ; and the hook was a 
large black one, baited either with a wrig- 
gling angleworm, a minnow, or sometimes 
a frog's leg. 

The grass was heavy with dew and the 
Eastern sky was reddening when my uncle 
and I walked over the meadow and pas- 
ture lands and the rolling, sandy road 
which led to Cooper lake. This lake cov- 
ered a few hundred acres, its greatest 
width measuring about half a mile; and 
on its surface arose a small island dotted 
with clumps of trees and bushes. The 
banks of the lake were almost encircled by 
a forest. We crossed the lake in an old, 
flat bottomed boat and the creaking of its 
long, clumsy oars echoed and re-echoed 



weirdly through the surrounding forests. 
When we came to Long Lake creek, which 
discharged its pure, clear, cool waters into 
Cooper lake, we met an irritating difficulty. 
As the creek's banks were covered with an 
almost impenetrable thicket, it was impos- 
sible for us to land without dragging our 
boat up the stream until we came to a 
clearing. In working our way through the 
network of bushes and vines we were often 
struck in the face and eyes. I never be- 
fore had seen my uncle impatient, and I 
am fearful he used language foreign to his 
customary speech and improper for a boy 
to hear. Finally, however, we came to a 
clearing, in which we left the boat. 

From the clearing to the falls of Long 
Lake creek was about 2 miles. Above the 
falls the stream was sluggish, but below 
them it wound through a beautiful forest, 
and the music of the sparkling waters 
dancing over the boulders was a delight 
to hear. In this part of the stream were 
the favorite haunts of the trout. 

Along the banks great trees grew and 
beneath them the water had washed out 
deep recesses or pools. In those dark, deep 
pools my uncle said the trout were. He 
told me to fish in every deep hole, beneath 
every log, beside the large boulders, and in 
all places which looked favorable as a trout 
retreat. He even kindled my imagination 
by telling me if I fished carefully and made 
no noise I might catch a large, cunning old 
fellow, who lived a solitary life, although 
I ought to be content if I caught the small- 
er fry. 

For reasons then unknown to me, my 
uncle fished up the stream instead of be- 
ginning at the falls and fishing down. He 
told me to follow him a distance up the 
brook and to watch his method of fishing. 
I followed, watched, and made as little 
noise as possible, although I occasionally 
fell among the bushes or sent something 
splashing into the water. It seemed to me 
that he had a trout dangling from his line 
at almost every cast, and when I left him 
to try my luck, he was stepping from stone 
to stone and swinging his rod in the air. 

When my uncle was out of sight I tried 
my hand at casting, but I made a woful 
failure of it I could not skim the bait 
over the water and my hook was always 
catching on the shrubs and bushes or into 
my pantaloons. Not a nibble, much less a 
strike, did I receive through my efforts. 
Determined not to give up without further 
trials, I wandered up and down the creek, 



22 



RECREATION. 



dropping my bait wherever I thought there 
was a possibility of landing a trout. I had 
no success. I felt that trout fishing was a 
sweet delusion, and, tired, discouraged and 
heavy hearted, I was tempted to give up in 
despair. I should have done so had I not 
been fearful that my uncle would never 
again take me with him. Therefore I kept 
on fishing. 

I must have strolled for hours from one 
part of the brook to another before I came 
to a huge elm tree beneath whose twisted 
roots there was a deep, black pool. I 
noiselessly crept up behind the elm and 
dropped my hook into the pool. Instantly 
there was a tug at my line. How excited 
I was! What a thrill of joy passed over 
me! I jerked my line from the water as 
hard as I could, expecting to have a trout 
as large as a sucker on my hook. I fell 
backward, my pole flew into the air, and 
my hook caught among the overhanging 
branches of the elm. There was no trout. 
My hook must have caught on a root of 
the tree. I sadly scrambled up and disen- 
tangled my line from the elm's branches. 
Then I re-baited my hook and again 
dropped it into the pool. Again there was 
a jerk at my line. Ah, it was not a root 
that time, for I saw the gleaming sides of 
a trout as he darted away beneath the tree. 



How he pulled ! I yanked my line from 
the water and sent him flying from my 
hook into the air. He landed on the sand 
several yards from me, and near the banks 
of the brook, which was, at that spot, shal- 
low and narrow. I instantly dropped my 
pole and ran for him, splashing through 
the water, and when near him I fell on 
him, just as he was about to flop into the 
brook. 

I tenderly took up my trout and exam- 
ined him. What a beauty ! He was as 
delicately marked as a piece of rare china. 
He was considerably over a foot long, I 
felt sure, and must have weighed over a 
pound. 

I cut a forked branch from a tree and 
strung my trout on it. Hearing a noise 
behind me, I looked around and there, 
watching me, stood my uncle with a large 
string of trout. 

"Well! Well!" he exclaimed. "Where 
did you catch him? Why, he's bigger than 
any I've caught today !" 

I told him. I was bursting with pride. 

"It beats me what luck these youngsters 
have," he muttered as we wended our way 
down the stream toward our boat. 

My weariness was gone, and I was one 
of the happiest boys in the world, for I 
had caught the biggest trout of the season. 




THE SEAGULL. 



EDITH M. CHURCH. 



AMATEUR PHOTO BY A. N. FLINN 

CURIOSITY NEARLY SATISFIED. 
Winner of the 25th Prize in Recreation's 7th 
Annual Photo Competition. 



Skimming the wave with pinions free, 
Sailing far out o'er the restless sea ; 
Soaring up to the bending sky, 
Courting the cloudlets drifting by ; 
Then down again till your snowy breast 
Kisses the foam from the green wave's 

crest ; 
Fearless and free you onward go, 
Scorning the dangers that lurk below ; 
With nothing to guide your onward flight, 
Yet swift and sure you go through the 

night. 

And I, far out on life's great sea 
Would guide my bark as fearless and free 
Through wind and wave, nor turned aside 
By gathering storm or treacherous tide. 
Trusting the Power that marks your 

course 
On the trackless sea, with compelling force 
Will guide me through the storm and 

night, 
'Till I see through the mists the harbor 

light. 




SLATY BACK GULL. LARUS SCHISTISAGUS. 

23 



A STUDY OF FEATHERS. 



MARY M. CALDWELL. 



I spent 2 years in the far Wes L . My 
home was not 20 miles from Seattle and 
near Lake Washington. My husband and 
brother had been quail hunters in Ken- 
tucky, so they were not long in discovering 
many ducks in the lake and grouse in the 
great forests back of us. There was large 
game, too. Bear had twice been seen near 
our house, but in that kind of game I was 
not interested, except to keep as far from 
it as possible, I did become much inter- 



turned from a day's sport I had a double 
interest in seeing the game bags emptied ; 
that of a good dinner and adding new 
specimens to my collection of feathers. 

I came in possession of a quantity of 
rare feathers in an unexpected way. There 
came to our house one day a man who had 
lived and hunted in that country many 
years. I mentioned my collection of feath- 
ers, and he told me he had saved a great 
many to use for making artificial flies for 







'£ 








PINTAIL DUCK FEATHERS. 



ested in the birds, not as an ornitholo- 
gist nor for the adorning of bonnets, but 
because the birds were beautiful. I treas- 
ured the feathers as I did the rare mosses 
of that country. When the hunters re- 



trout fishing. He brought them to me, 
beautifully arranged, each variety tied up 
separately and wrapped in paper. They 
completed my collection and thereafter I 
took less interest in the game bag. 



24 



W Y DE FISH DON' BITE. 



25 




I have never seen such beautiful mosses 
as those of the Northwest. 'Hie ground 
moss I pressed in the usual way, but the 



tree moss T treated as seaweed, letting it 
stand in water over night, then floating it 
on paper. This tree moss is not espe- 
cially attractive during the dry season, but 
when the rain comes, it hangs from the 
trees like the Southern moss. Being a 
lovely green it is, however, far more beau- 
tiful. 

The mosses and rare feathers, mounted 
on water color paper and looking like 
paintings, made Western souvenirs for 
many friends across the Rockies. 



W'Y DE FISH DON' BITE. 

EDWARD BONNEL. 



It's mighty ha'd ter splane w'y de fish 

don' bite 
Wen dis niggah's ben a-nshin' wif 's tackle 

jes' right; 
Wen er ripple's on de watah an de win s 

Sou' West, 
En he done know how to kotch 'em erlong 

wif de best. 

Sing O ! Miss Mandy. 



Ef hit ain't in de rod, er de reel, er de line, 
Case de boat's too big, er de hook's too fine ; 
Er de sinker's too hebby, er 'e didn't brung 

er net, 
Den de po' ole man ain't learned how yet. 
Watch out, mah chillun. 



Praps de win's cuttin' capahs, er de sun's 

too bright, 
Er dis po' tired niggah's played craps all 

night. 
P'raps dey's lonesome en quit bitin' case 'e 

kim so late. 
Er dey mos' all wanted er different kin' o' 

bait. 
Oh! don' git weary. 



I's cast de Colonel Fuller wif de Par- 

machene Belle, 
En den de Royal Coachman wif Jenny Lind 

as well ; 
But dey wouldn't tak' de las' nor rise to de 

fust, 
En de possum up de 'simmon tree laugh 

till he bust. 

I's comin' home, Dinah. 

I's happy wif mah wum can w'en I think it's 

gwine ter rain, 
En ef de sun comes out w'y I 'low I cain't 

complain ; 
But I loves ter heah de catfish sizzling in 

de skillet, 
An' O bless mah soul ! I sholy hopes ter 

fill it. 

But w'en it ain't in de weathah, ner yet in 

de bait, 
En hit ain't case I started jes' a leetle too 

late ; 
Den I knows hit's de rabbit's fut am sholy 

ter blame, 
Case I done clean fergit um en I's sorry I 

came. 

Good by, mah honey. 



Mrs. Noorich — Isn't it grand to ride in 
your own carriage? 

Mr. Noorich — Yes, but I'd enjoy it more 
if I could stand on the sidewalk and see 
myself ride by. — Brooklyn Life 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY ERW!N R. LOGAN. 



THE FOILED REPOISTE. 
One of the 31st Prize Winners in Recreation's 7th Annual Photo Competition. 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY ERWIN R. LOGAN 



A NARROW MARGIN. 
One of the 31st Prize Winners in Recreation's 7th Annual Photo Competition. 

26 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY ERWIN R. LOGAN. 

A GRAND STAND PARRY. 
One of the 31st Prize Winners in Recreation's 7th Annual Photo Competition. 



WHAT WOULDN'T I GIVE. 



A. N. KILGORE. 



What wouldn't I give 

T' jes' go back whar I used t' live, 

An' be a little tad agin, 

With a freckle face an' a foolish grin, 

A stubby_nose an' a stone-bruised heel, 

An' a thatch th' color o' Indian meal ; 

Black an' blue spots on each leg, 

An' go by th' name o' "Turkey-Egg"; 



T' range aroun' from break o' day 
Till Natur' put th' sun away; 
T' loaf thar by th' swimmin' hole 
With that ole bent pin an' alder pole ; 
T' hear th' bummin' o' th' bees, 
An th' wind astirrin' th' wilier trees ; 
T' know th' birds an' fish an' toads 
Like I knowed th' stumps in th' ole wood 
roads ; 



T' live jest like I used to do 
In barefoot joy th' summer through ; 
T' see th' world with childish eyes, 
When all was truth an' none was lies; 
An' life was jes' as oweet a song 
As th' one th' woodthrush sings at dawn. 
Ef I could do jes' that agin, 
I b'lieve I'd give mos' anythin'. 
27 



THE J AC AN A. 



L. P. GRAY. 



One of nature's best examples of adap- 
tation of bird life to its surroundings is 
seen in the Jacana family. In this, as in 
many other species, the appearance is, in a 
measure, an index to the habits of the 
bird. The food of the Jacana consists of 
aquatic insects and vegetable matter which 
it obtains by walking on the lily pads and 
other large-leaved aquatic plants. The pe- 



tailed Jacana is found. The Mexican Ja- 
cana (Parra gymno stoma) inhabit Cen- 
tral America and Mexico, also just enter- 
ing the United States on the borders of 
Texas. The common Jacana (Jacana spin- 
osa) is a native of Southern America. 
This bird is well armed with that curious 
spur or claw on the wing which naturalists 
tell us "is developed at the radial side 




MEXICAN JACANA. 



culiar shape and size of the feet make this 
possible. The body of the bird is rather 
small and is supported on slender, stilt-like 
legs with immensely elongated feet, fur- 
nished with straight nails. The wire-like 
toes distribute the weight on a sufficient- 
ly large surface to support the bird on 
thin, soft leaves. The Jacanas form a 
small family of tropical birds which are 
closely allied to the plover. Several species 
inhabit tropical America. Another genus 
is Indo-African in its distribution ; an- 
other Malayan, while in India and the 
countries to the East, including the Phil- 
ippine Islands and Formosa, the pheasant- 



28 



of the first metacarpal." This is used as 
a weapon by these birds of quarrelsome 
disposition. In some other species the 
spur is small and blunt, but an extraordi- 
nary development of the wing bone com- 
pensates for a real spur, as a severe down- 
ward blow can be dealt by this substitute. 
The common Jacana is a good swimmer 
and is shy and difficult to kill. They are 
generally seen singly, but in the morning 
and evening feed in flocks. When flying 
the long legs are thrown out horizontal- 
ly, after the manner of the heron. From 
a curious habit of stretching up the wings 
until they meet over the back it would 



POUNDING THE WRONG COON. 



29 



seem that the Jacana is vain, and par- 
donably so, of his beautiful black-tipped 
greenish yellow wing feathers. The head 
and neck are black with a green gloss, 
the body and wing coverts a deep chestnut. 
A set of 4 eggs of this species are described 
as being of "a rounded oval shape, having 
a ground color of bright drab and marbled 
over the entire surface with an interesting 
network of black lines. The markings 
curve and wind in various ways, always 
in rounded, never in angular, turns, and 
the eggs present a peculiar, unmistakable 
and characteristic appearance." 

Unlike the typical short-tailed Ameri- 
can bird, the pretty Chinese Jacana (Hy- 



dro phasianus) , or water pheasant, is a 
peculiar looking bird, having long, grace- 
ful tail feathers, carried like those of a 
pheasant. During the rainy season this 
Jacana builds a crude, flat nest in flooded 
districts where the lotus abounds, weav- 
ing grass and weeds in with some grow- 
ing aquatic plant to retain it buoyant on 
the surface. The eggs are olive brown 
and the number 6 or y. The notes of this 
bird are heard day and night, and so close- 
ly resembles the mewing of a kitten as to 
earn the title of Meewa from the natives. 
The flesh of this Jacana is excellent, and 
consequently it is in demand among 
sportsmen. 



POUNDING THE WRONG COON. 



W. H. NELSON. 



One evening in the 50's I spent a night 
with a school chum, and to get as much 
out of the evening as possible we decided 
on a coon hunt. My chum, John Mc- 
Gonigle, had a hound, Bounce, possessing 
a voice which made him famous in that 
region. It could be heard in South 
America. 

A walk of half a mile across fields and 
woods took us to a wide cornfield, newly 
gathered. Across this flowed several small 
streams, whose banks were lined with 
briers and small trees. 

Up one of these trees, a young ash, 
Bounce treed a coon, a whopper, as it 
proved. John generously delegated to me 
the honor (?) of shaking the game out, 
which I proceeded with much reluctance 
to do. 

It took a good many swings to loosen the 
coon's grip on the top limb. I was almost 
directly beneath him, and fully expected 
him to drop on me, a fear which came peri- 
lously near being realized, for when he let 
go above, his claws scraped my back as he 
dropped. In my fright I almost followed 
him. 

Once on the ground Bounce sprang 
nobly to work, and for a time there was 
such a tangle of snarls, squeals, yelps, and 
howls, such a bedlam of dog and coon, 
that I dared not come down lest I bhould 
alight on preempted territory. 

The coon was too many for Bounce and 
after several rounds, we concluded to go 
to the aid of our ally. 



But we had no gun, no ax, no club. 
Cutting, with much effort, a tough boi gh 
from the ash, keeping all the while my 
weather ear open for sounds of a renewal 
of the conflict, I came, at last, into the 
arena with a heavy, green club, hard to han- 
dle, but meant to carry death to the coon, 
if I could hit him. 

It was a hazy, starlit night, and objects 
on the ground were mighty dim. Peep- 
ing carefully, and poking with my long 
club, I found the coon and proceeded to 
wallup him unmercifully, while Bounce, 
panting and resting, looked on. 

Pounding away till I was sure I had 
broken every bone in the coon's body, 
and my own wind completely, [ stepped 
aside to take breath. Just at that moment 
Bounce sprang on the coon in a different 
direction from the point of my battle, and 
a fresh and furious fight took place. 

This time I watched and the moment 
Bounce retired, which he soon did, I 
struck, and fortunately hit the enemy on 
the head. The blow would have felled an 
ox, and Zip went down. For some time I 
continued to rain blow after blow on my 
unconscious victim and only quit when he 
was pulp. The object I had beaten so 
furiously before proved to be a tussock of 
sod. 

Next morning we skinned our game. He 
weighed 19 pounds, and John Martin im- 
mediately told of one of his coons which 
weighed 25 pounds. We would have been 
glad to lead the record, but not by lying. 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY PERRY ARCHIBALD. 



A HARD ONE TO LAND. 
One of the 32c! Prize Winners in Recreation' s 7th Annual Photo Competition. 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY PERRY ARCHIBALD. 



MUSCOVY DUCK ON NEST. 
One of the 32c! Prize Winners in Recreation' s 7th Annual Photo Competition. 

30 



MONTANA REMINISCENCES. 



J. A. DUFFY. 



In the summer of 1894 I was invited by- 
Mr. Robert Swaim, the well known land- 
scape painter, of Helena, to accompany him 
on a sketching and hunting trip into the 
hills in the Northern part of Deer Lodge 
county. We left Helena earlv in August 
and went to Avon, thence North into 
Washington gulch, intending to stay there 
about a month and then cross the hills into 
Jefferson and McLellan gulches. 

Washington gulch is famous in the early 
history of Montana, because, with Alder 
and Last Chance, its name conjures up to 
the mind of the Westerner visions of un- 
told wealth ; but few traces of its former 
glory are left. Great banks of tailings and 
deep excavations tell of industry and sacks 
of gold dust ; but these banks, together 
with the old deserted towns, are all that 
connect the gulch with the past. 

The town stands as it did in the early 
6o's except that there are no inhabitants. 
The dance hall is still there but there are 
no dancers. Yet the American flag, which, 
perhaps, was hoisted during the Civil War, 
has never been furled.. Its tattered folds 
still cling to the flag staff, but its colors 
are no longer visible. When the surround- 
ing cabins shall have given way to the ele- 
ments the town of Washington will have 
passed into history. 

We went up the gulch about 2 miles 
and pitched our tent on the banks of a 
picturesque little stream. One evening I 
told Mr. Swaim that instead of accompany- 
ing him on his sketching trip I would go 
out prospecting. The following day, armed 
with a gold pan, a pick and a shovel I set 
out toward Jefferson gulch, about 2 miles 
from the camp. There I dug a hole 
about 10 feet deep and reached bed rock. 
The colors were not numerous, but I was 
well compensated for my labor because to 
the result of that day's work I owe my life. 
A band of cattle which roamed over the 
valley had become so wild that the sight 
of a man in the distance would frighten 
them into running. I saw them on many 
occasions and every time they fled promis- 
cuously. On that particular evening they 
lay behind a knoll along which I must 
pass on my way home. In the absence of 
city entertainment might I not have some 
amusement, even if it were of the school- 
boy order? I would steal around on the 
other side of the knoll and beat the pan, 
like an Indian, The cattle, of course, 
would shake the plain in their efforts to 
get away.- Theory and practice sometimes 
telescope each other and in this case the 



collision was unusually severe. Every head 
in the band jumped up and snorted. Then 
they started, but I was the magnet toward 
which they were drawn. I confess I was 
rather &fraid and, taken as I was by sur- 
prise, I stood there as speechless as a 
Montana Senator. I looked around for 
some object to which I might flee. The 
bare broad valley of Nevada creek lay be- 
fore me. 

Even the trees on the blue grey foot 
hills looked more dim and distant than 
usual. In a moment I was reminded of 
the prospect hole and toward that I fled, 
with a band of infuriated cattle behind me. 
Even a<: a bank cashier skedaddles to Can- 
ada so did I flee from my pursuers. To 
say I reached the bottom of the hole on 
schedule time would be equivalent to say- 
ing I was gored to death. In the matter of 
pace making I established a precedent. 
Having disappeared so suddenly the cattle 
seemed to forget where they were at and 
but for a little occasional bellowing, as if 
in play, I heard no more of them. When 
they had wandered into a ravine which led 
to the foothills I ventured to the camp in 
safety. 

The next few weeks were uneventful ; 
given chiefly to sketching and shooting 
coyotes, which are active in that part of 
the State. These animals are a nuisance 
to camp life. There is nothing they will 
not eat, from case eggs up to an axe 
handle. I have never heard of one's gnaw- 
ing the inscription off a tombstone, but to 
a coyote nothing is so sacred it is not 
palatable. They are, though so familiar, 
a wary target to shoot at. 

One night I sat up later than usual and 
as it was warm I took up a position out- 
side the tent. When my companion retired 
he put out the light of the candle so every- 
thing was in darkness. It was a beautiful 
night. The light of the full moon was 
beginning to break through a depression 
in the hills at the head of the gulch, throw- 
ing a golden flood over everything. The 
stately pines whispered back soft words of 
greeting and the little brook seemed to 
chatter more pleasantly. While thus in a 
sentimental mood listening to the mysteri- 
ous noises of nature, I was suddenly 
startled by the howl of a sweet voiced 
coyote. I waited for another, in order to 
locate my game and was agreeably sur- 
prised to find him sitting on a pile of castel- 
lated rocks, sharply silhouetted against the 
moon. Whistler would have called it an 
arrangement in black and gold, but to me 



V 



32 



RECREATION. 



it suggested nothing so vividly as a splen- 
did opportunity for a cowardly hunter. 
Stealing into the tent I picked up Swaim's 
old Springfield rifle, which, by the way, 
was a relic of the Nez Perces war, and, 
resting it on a nail in the tent pole, took 
deliberate aim at the arrangement and 
fired. The landscape painter from Helena, 
ruthlessly divorced from his dreams, 
jumped up in bed, discharging questions 
at me about the color of their war 
paint and the particular tribe to which 
they belonged. I told him what had oc- 
curred and started out to throw the carcass 
over the cliff as otherwise it would 
make living intolerable. I confess I was 
rather chagrined when I reached the spot 
to see the coyote cantering listlessly into 
the night, while the moon still climbed the 
crystal walls of heaven. 

Some time afterward snow began to fall 
in the hills at the head of the gulch and I 
embraced the opportunity it afforded to 
go deer hunting. Deer are quite numerous 
in that part of Deer Lodge county, not- 
withstanding the frequent raids which are 
made on them by the Indians and some 
unscrupulous white settlers. One morning, 
feeling unusually bloodthirsty, I started up 
the hillside toward McLellan gulch. When 
I reached the hill top, which looks down 
en the gulch, I sat down on a log to rest 
and enjoy the wealth of scenery unveiled 
by my new position. Deer trails were 
numerous and I took a fiendish delight in 



the thought of how the full moon, looking 
down on the result of my marauding, 
would grow pale as he deplored the sudden 
decline of the deer industry in Montana. 
While thus engaged I was startled by the 
cracking of some underbrush which lay 
on the edge of a clump of quaking asp, 
directly behind me. I turned around sharp- 
ly in an effort to stare a mountain lion 
out of countenance. I felt rather un- 
comfortable and restless. I like sociability 
but reserve the privilege of selecting my 
acquaintances. After the correct imitation 
of Spanish gunnery I had given some time 
before I was loath to throw down the 
gauntlet to so formidable an animal. Yet 
it would be unsportsmanlike to run away,, 
I reasoned with myself, however, that since 
I started out to hunt deer I must confine 
myself to that species ; that if a mountain 
lion intruded on my privacy it showed his 
bad taste and that I was not to blame. 
This argument was so convincing I lost no 
time in disengaging myself from that cou- 
gar. Under such circumstances it is a gross 
breach of discipline to look back over 
one's shoulder, but I allowed myself that 
privilege and was rather pleased to find 
the cougar going in the opposite direction, 
with much enthusiasm, and that we were 
separated by about 500 yards of excellent 
Montana scenery. 

About the middle of November, the snow 
having become too deep for us to do anv- 
thing with comfort, we returned to Helena. 



A REPROACH TO WISCONSIN. 




Here is a reproduction of a photograph 
of one Decatur Walker, of Lake Geneva, 
Wis., who poses as one of the "great fish- 
ermen" of that village. He is evidently 
proud of the slaughter or he would not 
have been photographed. WaiKer parades 
the dog in the picture as if he might have 
been an accomplice, but the latter seems 
to have more sense than his master, for he 
looks away from the camera, and is evi- 
dently ashamed of the butchery perpetrat- 
ed by his boss. 

Walker's number in the pen is 877. — 
Editor. 



"I don't think much of this museum," 
said Jinks. "They ain't got no skull of 
Napoleon Bonaparte, and the one I was in, 
up to New York, has 2." — Baltimore Amer- 



ican. 



DECATUR WALKER, LAKE GENEVA, WIS. 



She — You say you are devoted to art. 
W r hat is the particular art that you love 
best ? 

He — Thou art. — Kansas City Times. 



THE FLORIDA KID. 



CHARLEY APOPKA. 



XL 



It seemed like ter me soon's I got ter 
sleep, pa shook me, an' sez, "Git up, son; 
git up an' help git breakfast." 

It was cold as the dickens an' I shore 
hated ter crawl outen them warm blankets. 
I hopped out an' jumped inter my clothes, 
an' holp pa bake the biscuit an' fry the 
steaks, an' Mr. Sam tied up old Ring, an' 
put* 14 catridges in 'is Winchester. We et 
a snack, an' put a plenty fer our dinner in 
our bags, an' lit out jest as it was a gittin' 
light in the East,. 

We went straight ter where we cleaned 
my deer, an' there was sign a plenty in the 
wet sand in the bottom of the ditch. Look 
like all kinds of varmints had been there; 
but Mr. Sam showed old Ring the painter 
sign, an' he bristled up mighty fierce an' 
sorter whined. Mr. Sam mutched 'im a 
little, an' he switched 'is tail, an' took off 
through the woods to'rds camp. He went 
within a quarter of it, an' then circled 
to'rds the big hammock, an' led into the 
thickest part of it. Old Ring begun ter 
git sorter excited when we come to a 
mighty thick place, where some big trees 
had fell down, an' we thought maybe the 
varmint was in there, but he'd hearn us 
a comin' an had lit out, an' old Ring kep' 
on through, an' out inter the open woods 
again. It was sun up by then an' I was 
glad of it, fer it was cold as the mischief. 

We run through a big bunch of turkeys, 
but we never shot 'em, fer we weren't after 
nothin' but painter that day. We kep' a 
goin an kep' a goin' an run plum out of 
the country where we'd been huntin' be- 
fore. Pa said, 

"If he keeps a goin this way we'll have 
ter quit 'im,. We're ever bit of 10 miles 
from camp," but the trail begun ter circle 
'round, an' directly we was goin' to : rds 
camp again. We jumped 11 deer, an' 3 
bunches of turkeys, an' no tellin' how many 
poterges an squirrels. Pa said it 'ud be a 
good place fer us to come nex' day to git 
our meat ter carry home. 

Well, sir, that blame varmint come clean 
back an' went inter the big cypress swamp, 
a half mile from camp. Mr. Sam said the 
painter was a gittin' tired, an' I know I 
was. We entered the swamp erbout half 
after 2 o'clock. It was dry 'ceptin' in 
holes, but it was mighty bad travelin', 'cas- 
ion of the cussed bamboo briers an' vines. 
Old Ring got way ahead of us, an' we didn't 
know which way ter go, so we stopped ter 
rest a minit, an' direckly we hearn 'im 
bay, way off in the swamp. 



"He's treed, by grannies; he's treed," we 
all hollered, an' dashed on fast's we could 
go, fer we had ter be outen there by dark, 
an' I woulden fool yer.. We had got nearly 
to 'em when old Ring breaks out a yelpin' 
like he was runnin' somethin' an went a 
quarter further before he treed again. 

"Dad burn it all," sez Mr. Sam, "he 
jumped out an' run when he seen us a 
comin'." 

Pa said him an' me 'ud circle round, an' 
come up on the far side of the varmint, 
an' fer Mr. Sam ter wait till he hollered, 
and then we'd close up on the gentleman. 
It took pa 'n me a right smart while ter git 
around fer the swamp was so thick some- 
times we had ter crawl under the briers 
ter keep from havin' our close tore offen 
us. There was lots of cat squirrels, the 
gentlest I ever seen. I don't reckon they 
ever seen a human before. When we was 
ready pa hollered, an' Mr. Sam 'sponded, 
an' we moved up to'rds old Ring. When 
we was in 50 yards of the dog Mr. Sam 
hollers an' sez : 

"I kin see the ole scounle, an gentlemen 
he's a whopper." 

We moved to'rds 'im mighty keerful, an' 
then we seen ole Ring a prancin' about 
under a big cypress that had fell an lodged 
in some other trees, an' up in the limbs 
was the ole varmint, an' he looked like the 
daddy of all cats. Ever 'casionally he'd 
growl, like thunder way off. Pa told Mr. 
Sam ter draw a bead on the burr of 'is 
ear, an' he'd keep his gun ter use on 'im 
after he hit the ground. Mr. Sam took 
a rest on a tree, an' when the rifle crecked 
the painter give a yowl an' jumped right 
toward us, an' come a crashin' through 
the vines 'ithin 20 feet of where we was a 
standin'. Jest as he hit the ground, pa give 
'im both bar'ls, full in the face, an' sich a 
tearin' up of briers I never seen before, 
an' 'is growlin' was fright'nin' to hear. We 
stepped back of a cypress, out of 'is way, 
an' direckly he crawled up on a big log 
out of the briers. His head was all blood 
an' he acted like he was blinded. "Give it 
to 'im in the neck, son, an' stop 'is sufferin," 
pa said, an' I took a good aim an let 'im 
have it jest back of 'is head, an' that settled 
'im.. He rolled offen the log an' kicked a 
time er 2 an died. 

Mr. Sam had been a holdin' old Ring 
back ter keep 'im from gittin' tore up, an' 
when the painter was dead he turned 'im 
loose, an such another proud dog I never 
seen. He'd smell of the varmint an' growl 



33 



34 



RECREATION. 



an' look at us an' switch 'is tail like he was 
the king of dogs. The old painter was 
shore a bad lookin' critter an' I woulden 
fool yer. Mr. Sam's bullet had gone too 
high an' cut a hole in one ear, an' gashed 
'im acrost the scalp. Pa had shot out both 
eyes an' riddled 'is breast, an' my shot tore 
'is neck all up an' he was about as deal as 
they ginnally git, an' I was mighty glad 
of it, fer 'is tushes an' claws war terrible. 
Pa sez, 

"Boys, we've got ter hustle, if we git that 
hide off, fer we've got ter be out of the 
swamp by night," an' we all 3 went ter 
work on it, an' had the hide off direckly. 
We made our way out quick's we could, 
but it was plum dark by the time we got 
clear of the swamp. Pa fired his gun an' 
hollered, an' in a minit we hearn Uncle 
Dick's gun go twice, an' direckly he had a 
big fire a goin' to guide us back ter camp. 



We was shore the tired humans when we 
got there, an' hungry, gee whitiker ! Well 
I reckon. Uncle Dick had the finest mess 
of steaks an' pertaters, an' biscuits, an' 
gravy cooked up I ever tasted, an he had a 
chunk of the back straps with the kidneys 
on it, baked in the skillet, an' talk about 
yore eatin' ! But we shore done some of 
it that night. 

After supper we stretched out the painter 
hide, an' it was 3 times the length of pa's 
ramrod, which is jest 3 foot long, lackin' 
an inch. We laid around the fire an' made 
plots fer nex' day. Pa said there'd be a 
frost in the mornin' an if we could kill 4 
or 5 deer, we'd pull out fer home the; day 
after. I didn't mind goin' home so bad 
now I'd killed me a deer, fer the sooner we 
got there the quicker I'd git my rifle. The 
last thing I hearn that night was 2 foxes a 
barkin' clost ter camp, 



A DAY OFF. 

EMMA G. CURTIS. 

There's a big covered wagon drawn up at They will camp where bright waters have 



the gate, 
There's crowding and hurrying, none must 

be late; 
It is seven already, there's no time to wait, 
The toilers will take a day off. 
It is hot in the hamlet and dull on the 

farm, 
The toilers are weary, of brain and of arm, 
They seek now the mountain's or forest's 

wild charm, 



murmuring sweep, 

Where shadows lie heavy, where light- 
daggers leap, 

Where children may frolic and wade ankle 
deep, 

And revel in pleasure's glad quest. 

The lunch will be spread under wide 
branching trees, 

The diners will bare fevered heads to the 
breeze; 



,, T1 ' , ' A . .„ , ~ And tired out women will gossip at ease, 

Where care s heavy crown they will doff. And work _ weary hands will nnd reSt . 



weary 

Then after the day and its glories are 

done, 
Well wearied, well rested, and happy each 

one, 
The wagon will homeward at setting of 

sun, 
Discharging its freight at the door. 
No fashion : cramped picnic is moving, I In the stillness of midnight the toilers will 

ween, dream 

A cluster of neighbors seek some quiet Of echoing bird song and soft flowing 

scene stream. 

Where worries invade not, where Nature Will wake with new courage at morning's 

is queen, first beam, 

Where healing and rest they may woo. And welcome life's burdens once more. 



There's a big. covered hamper stored some- 
where inside 

With loaves of white bread and with 
chickens brown fried, 

With pies where red cherries and raspber- 
ries hide, 

With pickles and jumble cakes, too. 



FROM THE GAME FIELDS. 

f heman who quits when he gets enough, with plenty of game still in sight, is a real sportsman. 



TIGER. 

Old Tiger has gone over the range ; gone 
to meet Dell, who quit her saddle when 
the soap weed bloomed last year. 

As Tiger has so often, in the past 10 
years, crossed the trail before the readers 
of Recreation, I believe you will be in- 
terested in this, his last great journey. 
Not that I would try to tell the many in- 
cidents in his eventful career. Their re- 
cital would fill Recreation from cover to 
cover. Neither do I say "he is dead;" for 
he passed on so peacefully it hardly seemed 
like death, but just the going from one 
good hunting ground to a better one. 

During the past few months we could 
see that his 12 years of active life, and 
the swift pace he had set during his hunt- 
ing and trapping seasons, were telling on 
him. Twice within the past 2 months he 
received loud calls from beyond the big 
mountains ; but each time we coaxed him 
back; and each time took a little better 
care of him. We gave him a good bed in 
the house, when he wished it, and the only 
password, day or night, was a whine at 
the door, which was always answered. 
When the nights were cold, or the fire 
burned low, we covered him with his old 
Navajo blanket. Few children have better 
care than old Tiger had in his last days, 
and as spring came he seemed quite 
his old self again ; but early one beautiful 
May morning when the old cottonwoods 
down by the river were feeling proud over 
their first tiny leaves ; when great bunches 
of cactus up Wildcat gulch were getting 
ready to put on pink ; when the graceful 
quaking aspens, higher up the mountain 
were swelling little bits of green, we found 
him under the trees at home. 

No indication of pain, or sign of strug- 
gle could be seen; just the good Lord, not 
the uncertain God of doubtful justice that 
theology teaches, but nature's real God of 
everlasting love, had blazed the trail for 
him to the land beyond the mortal thought 
The dream that we call mortal life had 
changed for him into the reality that is 
eternal. 

I sent word to my partner, one of Ti- 
ger's best friends, who had camped for 
•weeks at a time with only Tige for com- 
pany. He came, without waiting for his 
breakfast. 

"We'll bury him," I said, "out by the 
old trapping grounds. Will you order a 
carriage? Get Tim Roan if you can, for he 
is a real Westerner." 

At 9 o'clock my partner came, with Tim 
and his carriage. My business engagement 
with the St. Louis man for 8.30 was 



broken. Over the telephone came word 
that the committee would meet at 9.30. 

"Tell them I can't be there. We're go- 
ing to bury Tiger," 1 said. 

"But we have got the committee to- 
gether from the ends of the earth, almost. 
Can't—" 

"Tell them I shall not be there, They 
will have to wait," went back over the 
wire. 

Partner also had important business on 
hand : a big mining deal. 

"Can you spare the time?" I asked. 

"They can do something else till I get 
back," he replied. 

So we started. It is a long way to the 
old trapping grounds with a carriage, for 
civilization, that messenger cf doubtful 
good, has made vast strides about Canon 
City in the past few years, and we had 
many fences to go around before reaching 
our destination. On a little bluff high 
above the danger line from floods we dug a 
grave. Pine boughs, laid like a camp 
bed, covered the bottom. Over them Dell's 
best blanket was spread, and to make it 
still softer, Tige's old Navajo; and with a 
copy of Recreation containing a story of 
"Old Mose," a bunch of lilacs from the 
lawn where Tiger liked best to sleep, .and 
a cutting of rose buds from the choicest 
bush, we laid him to rest, close by his old 
hunting grounds. A bunch of cattle, on 
the hillside above, stopped grazing and 
looked down in silent approval. Off to the 
North loomed the wonderful Beaver moun- 
tains, Tiger's first camping grounds ; this 
side of them old Cooper, Felch creek and 
Lawrence canyon ; he has hunted there ; to 
the West the Tallahassee country, Bur- 
rows mountain, and the dear old Stirrup 
ranch ; he knows them all. To the South 
lie Virden mountain, Copper gulch and 
Grape creek ; he has been there, too, and 
in many other places far beyond ; to the 
East, his old home, and an empty kennel. 

We miss the whine in the early morning, 
and the trot of tired feet through the day. 
We miss the quiet doze of an evening, on 
his blanket in the corner, or curled up, as 
he liked best, on the big Navajo at the head 
of my bed. It would be selfish indeed to 
wish him back and I like to think of him 
as he is, in a country beautiful beyond 
description, chasing coyotes, but not to kill. 
I can see the spikes on his old hunting 
collar, but they are turned to gold, and 
his brindle coat is creamy white. He is 
getting ready for a big camping trip and I 
wonder if I shall ever meet him, away over 
that wonderful trail far above timber line. 
Who can tell? N. H. Beecher, 

Canon City, Colo. 



35 



36 



RECREATION. 



THE PRESERVATION OF GAME. 

STANLEY C. MORGAN. 

[Extract from a paper read before the Boys' 
Literary Society of the Waukesha, Wis., High 
School. Master Morgan is but 15 years old. I 
wish all boys felt as he does on this subject. — 
Editor.] 

There can scarcely be named a State or 
Territory that has not good game laws on 
its statute books; but laws that are not 
enforced are of no avail. Strict game laws 
must be enforced, or the remaining game 
will, like the buffalo and the Indian, soon 
disappear from our forests and our moun- 
tains. 

Fishing and hunting furnish the best 
kinds of recreation and exhilarating ex- 
ercise which benefit mind and body. If 
we would have future generations enjoy 
these sports and have these opportunities, 
we must protect the game. It is not wrong 
to take an animal's life for recreation. If it 
is right to kill animals for food, it can not 
be wrong to sacrifice them for a higher 
purpose, as health of body and mind. 

The true sportsman is a student and 
lover of nature. He kills his game in the 
most humane way; no snares, traps or 
poison. He makes every effort to secure 
wounded beast or bird. He does not hunt 
in the breeding or nesting season, when 
young creatures would starve on account 
of the death of parents. He never takes 
more game than he can use, but always 
leaves some for the next man. 

Game animals, game birds, song birds and 
fishes are the life of the landscape. What 
would the forests be without a deer, bear 
or moose? What would the prairies, fields 
and woodlands be without the game birds 
and song birds? What would the lakes, 
rivers and brooks be without a game fish? 

It would be a most lamentable thing 
from a scientific point of view if future 
generations should have no opportunity for 
studying large and small mammals. 

The preservation of our song birds de- 
pends largely on the protection of the game 
birds; for as soon as the goose, duck, prai- 
rie chicken, quail, etc., disappear, the robin, 
meadow lark, thrush, blue bird, etc., will 
become "game" and will soon follow. This 
is so in Italy, where real game birds have 
disappeared, and where the peasants kill 
nightingales and skylarks by the thousands 
as those birds migrate along the coast. 

Sportsmen in general advocate the propa- 
gation of game birds by the State and fed- 
eral governments, with a view to preserv- 
ing them. We have national and State fish 
hatcheries; why not national and State 
game bird hatcheries? There is more reason 
for the artificial propagation of game than 
of fishes, because nature has in various ways 
provided for the protection of fishes more 



liberally than she has for the protection of 
game. 

It may soon be necessary for farmers, 
who have more at stake in the preservation 
of game than all others, to form county or 
township organizations, and charge every 
hunter who comes into their territory a fee 
for the privilege of hunting. Then there 
would be an inducement for the farmers to 
raise and protect game. This plan has been 
adopted in Germany, and game there is as 
plentiful as it was 400 years ago. No per- 
son has any right to take game which is 
the property of the people and make mer- 
chandise of it for his own profit. The sell- 
ing of game will accomplish its complete 
extermination if not stopped, and it could 
be stopped within a few months if all the 
States would do their duty and enforce 
their laws. It is a well known fact that in 
all the more thickly settled States our game 
birds are decreasing each year; in some sec- 
tions, as much as 50 per cent. 

At this rate it will be only a short time 
before they will become extinct. This loss 
would be enormous in its effects. Not only 
to the sportsman and the interests he repre- 
sents, but also to the farmer and those de- 
pendent on agricultural products. The 
number of insects which game birds de- 
stroy is almost incredible. These insects 
wage relentless war on crops and all kinds 
of vegetation. 

The material value of our game is enor- 
mous and should be a strong factor in 
preserving it. Many people are annually 
attracted to this State by the good hunt- 
ing and fishing. They leave many thou- 
sands of dollars here. Maine expends $30,- 
000 annually for fish and game protection 
and propagation. Her people receive over 
$200,000 from the visitors who annually go 
there for fishing and hunting. 

The real and effective protection of our 
game must be built on the sympathetic 
understanding that it was placed on earth 
by a bountiful Creator to endure, and not to 
be exterminated ; to delight the eye and 
make this world a good and interesting 
place for man to live in, as well as to fur- 
nish him with a portion of his subsistence 
and a means for healthful recreation. 



WAS ACQUAINTED WITH MOSE. 

I have read H. N. Beecher's "Life Story 
of a Grizzly," in December, 1902, Recre- 
ation and find the main points true, for I 
hunted in Colorado from 1882 to 1896 and 
I think I traveled farther after old Mose 
than any man in that part of the Rockies. 
Beecher credits me with killing old Mose's 
father and brother, which I did. 

I began hunting Mose in '86. The first 
night I stopped at Hodges' ranch on Cot- 
tonwood, 12 miles from where! killed the 
King of the Rockies. I told Mr. Hodges 



FROM THE GAME FIELDS. 



37 



I was after Mose and he said the old fel- 
low was up there, but advised me to go 
back. I did not know much of Mose at 
that time, but wanted to get a look at 
him, so I moved over to Waugh's, now 
known as Stirrup ranch, and early the next 
morning I started for Poncha mountain. 
I had not gone far when I sighted the plain 
trail of old Mose. He seemed to be walk- 
ing leisurely along the gulch leading to 
the top of the mountain. I followed cau- 
tiously for half a mile and suddenly came 
within ioo paces of him. He saw me at 
the same time I saw him. There was a 
cedar bush between us, and I stepped to 
one side to get a good shot, but I stepped 
on ice and fell. Mose was standing on 
his hind feet, looking at me over his 
shoulder, and before I could get up he had 
got behind some spruce shrubs, out of sight 
of me. That was the only time I ever had 
the pleasure of looking at this monster of 
the Rockies. I had no traps at that time, 
but I hunted him 15 days, saw signs of him 
every day, but never got sight of him again. 

Then I went over on Poncha park, killed 
a large buck antelope, and started for 
Canon City, but stopped on lower Cotton- 
wood and got a big cinnamon bear that had 
just killed a 3 year old steer for Joe Hall. 

Every week brought new reports of 
Mose's scaring prospectors, killing cattle 
and raising Cain generally ; so, for 5 years, 
each season when his hide was supposed to 
be in good shape, I, among others, loaded 
up grub and bear traps and went after him. 
Each year I found one or 2 carcasses of ani- 
mals he had killed. He would lie around 
and eat, only going for water; and he 
would never return to the same spot after 
he had finished devouring his prey. 

In the fall of '95 Whort and I camped 
above Stirrup ranch. One morning Whort 
went up the gulch about a quarter of a 
mile. All at once I heard what sounded 
like the battle of Bull Run, and Whort 
came down to camp looking as if he had 
been in the run part of the fight. After 
breakfast he showed me where he had stood 
and shot at an old bear and 2 cubs. I 
went over and found one fine fat cub he 
had shot through the head. Next morning 
we went up the mountain about a mile. 
Suddenly 2 prospectors dashed into view, 
running down the mountain at the rate of 
about 20 miles an hour. 

"Hi there !" shouted I, "what are you 
running for?" 

"Because we can't fly !" roared one. 

They had seen Mose, and had given him 
a chance to run; but he wouldn't. 

One summer Joe Hall went up the moun- 
tain for wild raspberries. He had picked a 
big bucketful besides eating many more, 
when Mose happened along and took after 
him. Joe ran around a big log, with Mose 



after him. Joe gave up his berries, bucket 
and all, climbed a tree and yelled so loud 
that for the first time on record Mose ran, 
after the fight had commenced. It took 2 
days for the color to come back into Joe's 
face, and it is said he never wore the same 
suit of clothes again. 

The bear I killed was the one that killed 
Jake Radcliff, and its weight was 1,213 
pounds. Mose had larger tracks than the 
supposed Mose senior, and I consider him 
the shrewdest bear ever known in these 
parts. 

I like your stand on the game question. 
I have killed game of all kinds, but never 
wasted a pound of meat or killed an animal 
for the skin. 

J. J. Pike, Slagle, Mo. 



MY BIGGEST KILLING. 

In the fall of '69 my wife and I and her 
brother and his wife moved from the Wil- 
lamette to Eastern Oregon and settled in 
a small village through which ran a moun- 
tain stream emptying a few miles below 
into the John Day, 90 miles above its 
mouth. 

The hostile Snake Indians had just been 
driven out, while as yet there was but a 
sprinkle of white settlers. It was a beauti- 
ful country. Bench lands on which were 
scattering junipers extended back from 
the rivers 6 or 8 miles. Then came a spur 
of the Blue mountains, 15 miles across, 
covered with an open forest of pine, with 
fir and tamarack in the gulches and on the 
hillsides. Beyond this a plain, marked with 
an occasional canyon, rolled North 60 miles 
to the Columbia. There was bunch grass 
everywhere, uncropped save by wild ani- 
mals or Indian ponies. 

This plain is now netted with barbed 
wire fence and its surface is scarred into 
unsightliness by the gang plow. In the 
mountains and on the benches the bunch 
grass that was cured like hay by the cloud- 
less sun of summer, has been almost 
stamped out of existence by bands of sheep, 
horses and cattle. Stock men have fought, 
bled and died over the division of the re- 
maining mountain range. The great herdi 
of deer that used to come from the moun- 
tains to winter in the John Day country 
have vanished like the bunch grass. 

During the winter following our entrance 
into this country, our little party became 
meat hungry. Whitetail and mule deer were 
numerous. With a small bore, rusty, muz- 
zle loading rifle I had climbed the foot hills. 
for the whitetail and had crept up behind 
rocks and junipers for the mule deer, but 
without success. 

One morning as I shouldered my rifle 
my sister-in-law, who was an invalid, ban- 
teringly remarked that she would carry in 
all the game I killed that day. A short dis- 



38 



RECREATION. 



tance from the house i came on a whitetail 
standing on a steep hillside, some 30 yards 
away. At the crack of the gun the deer 
came rolling over almost to where I stood. 
Regaining its feet, it seemed bewildered 
a few moments. Then and there I was 
struck with the buck ague. I shook like a 
person with the every-other-day chills. I 
spilled half the powder trying to pour it 
into the gun. I could not find any patching, 
so I tore out a piece of my shirt. I drove 
the bullet home and threw down the ram- 
rod. My hand trembled so I could scarce- 
ly cap the tube. In the meantime the ani- 
mal came to and bounded off. I went 
home again without meat. 

There were 2 hunters camped 15 miles 
below, at the mouth of a small creek that 
entered the John Day. To them I went, 
riding one horse and leading a pack. The 
next morning after my arrival, in com- 
pany with one of the hunters and carrying 
a heavy muzzle loader, borrowed from his 
partner, I went out after meat. The reser- 
vation Indians were making a drive toward 
us; but we did not then know what made 
game so plentiful. At short distances we 
could see bands of deer on the rimrocks 
that jutted out from the hill sides. When 
any came within range our muzzle loaders 
would speak. 

My companion was a dead shot and a 
brutal man. A cruel gleam would light his 
eye (he had but one) when he saw his 
victim fall, and he would spring upon and 
stamp the helpless thing if it struggled 
while he put the knife to its throat. No 
matter how many he killed; I was not re- 
sponsible for his actions, and besides I am 
not writing his story. 

I brought down 3 deer, and the next 
morning loaded my pack for home. Don't 
put me down as a game hog, for we dried 
the 6 hams for summer use and were not 
long in getting away with the corresponding 
sides and shoulders. 

E. O'Flyng, Salem, Oregon, 



MONTANA ABOLISHES SPRING SHOOTING 
I enclose newspaper clipping showing 
what has been accomplished by our late 
Legislature for the protection of our game. 
You will be pleased to learn that turtle 
doves are now protected at all times. There 
are a few small bands of antelope near 
here which have grown less wild since 
they were put on the protected list. I can 
see 15 any day within a mile or 2 of the 
house, and last fall they watered in the 
meadow within sight of the house, every 
day or 2. While the new game law, which 
closes the season for deer December 1, in- 
stead of January 1, as heretofore, will be 
of great benefit to the deer by shortening 
the season and protecting them when the 
snow is deep in some localities, yet in the 



Little Snowy mountains, where I hunt, it 
will not be an unmixed blessing, as we 
often have no tracking snow until Decem- 
ber, so that hunting will have to be done 
on bare ground, which will allow many 
wounded deer to get away. 

I have been here 20 years, and although 
in the sheep business myself, I speak with- 
out prejudice when I say that, while the 
mountains are heavily pastured by sheep 
every summer, I see little diminution in the 
number of deer to be found every fall. Of 
course existing conditions must be taken 
into consideration. It was always the cus- 
tom of the deer, which, by the way, are of 
the whitetail and mule species, to go into 
the higher ranges in the summer, where 
sheep are unable to range, and to come 
down when the snow gets deep; few re- 
maining to have their fawns on the winter 
range. As our snowfall is generally light, 
deer seem able to winter in fair condition 
in spite of the sheep. I have only twice in 
20 years seen over a foot of snow in the 
foothills. 

The abolition of the spring shooting of 
ducks and geese, although few nest here, 
was advocated by all true sportsmen. I wish 
all States would follow Montana's example 
in that respect. 

Joseph L. Asbridge, Highfield, Mont. 

The clipping to which Mr. Asbridge re- 
fers is as follows : 

Under the new game laws of the State turtle 1 
doves are protected at all times. One may kill 
one mountain sheep a season. The open season 
on elk is the same as heretofore and the new law 
allows the killing of 2 bull elk during that season. 

The open season on deer and Rocky mountain 
goat is established in the new bill as September 
1 to December 1. The season on mountain sheep 
is the same. The new act permits the killing of 
3 deer and one goat; but it prohibits the hunting 
or chasing of any big game with dogs. 

The open season for grouse, prairie chickens, 
fool hens, sage hens and pheasants begins August 
15 and ends December 1. 

The bill abolishes the spring shooting of aquat- 
ic fowl and makes the open season for geese, 
ducks, brant and swans September 1 to January 1. 

The new law fixes the non-resident license at 
$25 for big game and $15 for small game. It 
makes provisions also in regard to the exporting 
of protected game or any part thereof from the 
State. 

The new act further provides that every person 
who is engaged in the business of guiding must 
procure a guide's license. 

Further, the act provides that all taxidermists 
must secure license. 

I am glad to know that your Legislature 
has passed so good a game law, and that 
antelope and deer still have so good a show 
for a permanent existence. As you doubt- 
less know, I have been, for 5 years past, 
working diligently to secure the enactment 
of laws providing long close seasons on 
antelope in the various Western States, 
and it is indeed gratifying to know that 
so many of these States have complied 
with the wishes of all Nature lovers in 



FROM THE GAME FIELDS. 



39 



stopping the killing of these beautiful ani- 
mals. 1 am sure this report will be hailed 
with delight by thousands of true sports- 
men. — Editor. 



TEPEE LIFE. 

One of the results of the tendency of 
this generation to enjoy life in the vyoods 
is the establishment of an Indian village 
for white people at Desbarats, Ontario. 
Every residence in the village will be a 
tepee or an Indian lodge. The tepees will 
be large, so that with a small fire in the 
middle there would be ample room to 
stretch out with feet to the fire and head 
to the outside skin. The site chosen is 
where the Ojibway play of "Hiawatha" is 
given. 

To facilitate matters for busy men all 
necessary supplies will be furnished in a 
convenient way. Canoe trips will be or- 
ganized, fishing parties conducted, and in 
every way difficulties to the uninitiated will 
be reduced to a minimum. The art of 
helping themselves will be taught the luxu- 
rious, gently and by degrees, so they may 
not be discouraged at the outset. 1 he sit- 
uation is one where the luxuries of life, 
which are indispensable for a time to those 
who have been their slaves, will be within 
reach. In this way the monotony of the 
physical exercises taught by health cul- 
turists is done away with. The weaker dis- 
ciples of the simple life will chop a little, 
paddle a little, walk a little; and their 
tasks will daily be increased in careful 
measure, so that the utmost benefit may 
follow. 

The country in the vicinity abounds in 
large and small lakes and game and fish. 
The season will gradually be extended, be- 
ginning in May for the trout fishing and 
ending November 15th, so as to take in 
the big game hunting season. For this year 
it will begin July 1st and last until No- 
vember 15th. 

It is a laudable ambition to harden one- 
self to endure the sun as well as the cold. 
At Desbarats a sunbath lasting 3 months 
can be taken, as it is rare for the sun to 
be too hot to keep people from walking, 
boating, canoeing, etc. Much may be 
gained by staying out in the sun 14 hours 
- day in the North. 



NOVA SCOTIA SWINE. 

Capt. Mitchell Smith returned to Clarks Har- 
bour, N. S., last week from a shooting excursion 
to Lockport in his steamer Cygnet. He took there 
a party of 4 good marksmen, besides himself, 
each with a small skiff of his own. All enjoyed 
a few days of prime sport in shooting ducks off 
Western Head. The total bag for 5 days was 
515, mostly coots. The 3 leading scores for a 
single day were: Howard Smith, 46; Mitchell 
Smith, 43, Walter Smith, 42. — Yarmouth Tele- 
gram. 



I wrote the persons named above, asking 
if their score was correctly reported. The 
following reply was received : 

As regards my killing 46 ducks in one 
day, you were correctly informed. That 
was not an extraordinary score, for I have 
killed a greater number in one day several 
times, the largest number being 82. The 
ducks killed include coots, eider ducks, old 
squaws, loons, sea pigeons, shellducks, blue- 
bills, black ducks, brant, etc. I have aver- 
aged 2,000 a year for the last 15 years; the 
best for one year being 2,200. We shoot 
from boats as the birds pass in the fall 
and spring, going from and to their breed- 
ing ground on the Labrador coast. If you 
wish to know more about the sport I will 
be pleased to answer any questions. 

Howard Smith, Hawk Point, N. S. 

I know enough already to brand you as 
a despicable, contemptible butcher, and I 
am surprised that decent men anywhere 
should allow you to live among them and 
carry on such slaughter as this, year after 
year. If ever a man deserved to be dressed 
in tar and feathers and whipped out of 
the town you do. I trust your neighbors 
will soon realize their duty toward you and 
that they will perform it. You and the 
other Smiths are numbered 878, 879 and 880 
in the game hog pen. — Editor. 



ADMITS HIS GUILT. 
"We nave a man here who exhibits 107 
quails and 5 rabbits as the result of one 
day's shooting. Another day he killed 
47 ruffed grouse. I wish you would give 
him a shaking up in Recreation. It 
would do him lots of good. His name is 
Wm. McDonald, No. 10 S. New street, 
Staunton, Va. He shoots a Winchester 
pump gun and men who hunt with him 
say he never kills less than 3 to 6 birds out 
of a covey, on a rise. If that isn't butchery 
what do you call it? Please give it to him 
strong. 

Subscriber, Taunton, Va. 

I wrote McDonald as follows: 

I am informed that you recently killed 
47 grouse in one day, and 107 quails in 
another day. Will you kindly tell me if 
this report is true? 

Here is his answer: 

Your letter received. J. L. Bumgardner 
and I bagged 48 grouse in one day and I 
killed 95 quails in one day. 

Wm. McDonald, Staunton, Va. 

The fact that you unblushingly admit 
your slaughter proves that you are entirely 
ignorant of the principles of decent sport. 
You should read a few copies of Recrea- 
tion and learn that real sportsmen always 



40 



RECREATION. 



quit when they get enough, no matter how 
much game may still be within reach. 
Your number in the game hog pen is 881 
and Bumgardner's is 882.— Editor, 



OUR SOUTHMOST CORNER. 

November 18th we left Miami in my 
20-foot smack for a cruise among the Flori- 
da Keys. Were out 6 weeks. We shot 
plenty of ducks, plover and other birds, 
caught turtles and fish, saw many white 
herons and great flocks of white ibis. 

This vicinity is the haunt of the Ameri- 
can crocodile; it is the only place in the 
United States where he is found. I have 
seen several large ones here. One, the 
largest in existence, as far as known, was 
captured alive by "Alligator Joe" last sum- 
mer, and is now at his place on Little river. 
It is 15 feet 6 inches in length. 

The chief difference between the 'gator 
and the crocodile is the former has a broad 
nose, while the latter has a sharp or point- 
ed one, with a tusk on either side of the 
lower jaw, extending straight up. The 
crocodile also is of a greenish hue, while 
the alligator is black or brown. 

Miami is the Southernmost railroad point 
in the United States, and within 5 miles 
of the famous Everglades. The glades, 
as it is here known, is not, as commonly 
supposed, a morass, so thick with tropical 
growth as to be almost impenetrable. On 
the contrary, it is a vast territory covered 
with saw grass, growing in clear, flowing 
water, 1 to 2 feet deep. Here and there are 
small islands, on which the deer feed and 
the Seminole Indians find a home. 

Any reader of Recreation wishing a 
pleasant winter vacation can not do better 
than start for Miami. 

Walter C. Fogg, Miami, Fla. 



CAMPING. 

The pleasure obtainable from a sojourn 
under canvas in the woods depends on 
the outfit carried, the location selected 
and the adaptability of the campers. 
Under proper conditions it is the most en- 
joyable and health-giving of pastimes. 

The selection of the outfit depends, of 
course, on the nature and duration of the 
proposed trip. Plenty of clothing is es- 
sential. Do not omit a selection of simple 
medicines for common ailments, nor go off 
without soap, towels and tooth brush. A 
waterproof suit will add greatly to your 
comfort. Take with you an ax, a lantern 
and oil, matches, a few nails, compass, fish- 
ing tackle, a rifle or shot gun with plenty of 
ammunition, a. hunting knife, coffeepot, tin 
pail, wire broiler, metal plates and cups, 
knives, forks and spoons. With those and 



your blankets or sleeping bags you have all 
that is really necessary. 

The tent should be large enough to hold 
outfit, provisions and your party without 
crowding. The quantity of food to be car- 
ried depends on the game and fish resources 
of the region you visit. I have found it 
wise to take a liberal supply and rely as 
little as possible on hunter's and angler's 
luck. P. Noycar, Quebec, Can. 

CRITICISES CONDITIONS IN MAINE. 
I am an interested reader of your most 
excellent magazine, and heartily endorse 
the principles on which it is based. After 
reading the article on moose snaring, in 
January Recreation, it seems to me one 
can find violations of the game laws in his 
own neighborhood ; perhaps not on so 
large a scale, but wherever there is game, 
some will always be illegally taken, regard- 
less of the law. Last fall I spent a few 
weeks in the vicinity of Moosehead lake. 
The residents never went hungry for deer 
meat. I saw one man in the woods with 
his pack basket full of it ; yet, Mr. Carle- 
ton, of the Maine Fish and Game Commis- 
sion, rules that non-resident sportsmen 
take home game in such quantities as to 
make it necessary to assess them ; the pro- 
ceeds to be devoted to watching the same 
visiting sportsman, who pays his guide $2 
to $4 a day, feeds him, and in all probabil- 
ity buys supplies through him. The na- 
tives live in peace and plenty. If all 
brother sportsmen would use their influ- 
ence in their own vicinity for the propa- 
gation, and the preservation of all game, 
the result would be surprising. 

Frank L. Palmer, Beverly, Mass. 



NEW GAME CARRIER. 
723,179. — Game Carrier. Milton C. 
Peters , Omaha, Neb. Filed May 5, 1902. 
Serial No. 105,971. (No model.) 




Claim. — A game carrier comprising a 
strand, a buckle arranged at each end of 
said strand, each of the extremities of said 
strand being curved to form an attaching 
loop permanently connected to the buckle 
thereat, said strand being coiled within the 
buckles and around said attaching loops 
when the carrier is adapted for use as a 
belt, said buckles having a slidable ad- 



FROM THE CAME FIELDS. 



4i 



justment on said strand for enlarging the 
coils of the latter to form carrying loops, 
and a hook formed on one of said buckles 
and adapted to engage the other buckle for 
sustaining the carrier in applied position 
when used as a belt. 



NOT A QUESTION OF GUNS. 

I am heartily in accord with the senti- 
ments expressed by Paul Mouser on page 
203 of March Recreation, only the gentle- 
men should have left the $8 and the $100 
gun out of the question, because when the 
poor farmer's boy goes out with the $2 
ferret he leaves the gun home. He puts 
the ferret in the hole, and a meal bag over 
the entrance. The rabbit, terrified, bounds 
for the open and a chance for life, runs 
into the bag, is yanked out, and, squealing 
pitifully, is clubbed to death without a 
single chance for its life. 

Is it not too bad that the poor farmer's 
boy who does this is termed a bristleback? 
Let us do away with the unfaithful setter 
because a hog, using a dog, kills more 
than his share. 

Getting quails with a setter is as bad 
as murdering rabbits, Mr. Mouser says, 
and my experience sustains his argument. 
The dog points. Then all one has to do is 
to walk out in front of the dog and kill 
the quail when it gets up. Therefore, as 
an amendment to Mr. Mouser's well ad- 
vanced theory, I suggest leaving both the 
$8 and the $100 gun at home. 

Harvey J. Flint, Providence, R. I. 



CAN NOT DENY THE CHARGE. 

Snipe shooting is in full swing on Lulu island 
and the Delta, and sportsmen report varying suc- 
cess. Last year Q. M. Sergeant Kennedy, of the 
Sixth Regiment, laid low no less than 337 of these 
birds, and this year 175 golden plover have fallen 
to his gun. A curious feature of the Provincial 
game laws is that no close season is declared for 
snipe. — Vancouver (B. C.) paper. 

Though Sergeant Kennedy failed to reply 
to my inquiry regarding the truth of the 
foregoing report, I received the following : 

Your letter to Fred Kennedy was read 
aloud in my place of business to-day. Ken- 
nedy said he would see you in , before 

he would give you particulars. He admit- 
ted, however, that he had killed, in 1901, 
687 snipe and plover. 

E. Galloway, Vancouver, B. C. 

As I have said before, a good way not to 
be called a game hog is not to be one. Mr. 
Kennedy's refusal to answer my inquiry di- 
rect can only be taken as evidence of his 
guilt, and he therefore justly deserves the 
contempt and reprobation of all decent 
sportsmen for having killed, as Mr. Gallo- 
way states, 687 snipe and plover in one 
season. Mr. Kennedy's number in the game 
hog pen is 883. — Editor. 



• MAKES WAR ON SPARROWS. 
I have one strong ally in my relentless 
war on the English sparrow, although our 
motives differ. I refer to the shrike. 
Wherever I live, there is war on the spar- 
row. Wherever the shrike lives there is 
also war on the sparrow. He eats them, 
I do not ; that is the difference between 
us, but the effect on the sparrow is about 
the same. I buy guns with great willing- 
ness, I spread out poison and I continu- 
ally say hard words. If I find a nest I de- 
stroy it ; yet I do not see that the pests 
decrease in number. I wish a stronger 
voice than mine would call on the Legis- 
latures of the different States and see if a 
general war of extermination can not be 
carried on. English sparrows have driven 
out the robins and orioles that once nested 
in our oaks about the house ; and now 
that dream of a song, the song of the early 
bluebird, is never heard near a town. Even 
the obstreperous jays leave in disgust. I do 
not blame them. By the way, if you live 
where the sparrow does not, put out little 
nest boxes for the bluebirds. 

Maude Meredith, New York City. 



PUMP GUN PROHIBITED. 

The new ordinance prohibiting the use 
of the pump gun in Marin county, this 
State, is a step in the right direction. In 
most States the use of a gun larger than 
10 bore is prohibited. Is not this because 
the larger bores are considered too de- 
structive? A 12 gauge repeating shot gun 
in the hands of a good shot must be far 
more destructive than a single or double 
10 bore. I call to mind a letter from a 
man praising his repeater. He said a flock 
of 10 ducks flew over his blind and he got 
them all ; not one escaped. Some say it is 
not the gun that makes the hog. That may 
be true ; but if the use of the pump gun is 
allowed, the hog will certainly use it. Four 
things must be done before we can have 
perfect game protection. These are : Pro- 
hibit the sale of game; limit the bag; pro- 
hibit the use of guns which are too destruc- 
tive; enforce the game laws, whatever they 
are, and if not good, have them changed. 
F. T. Johnson, Los Angeles, Cal. 



A SAMPLE OF KENTUCKY PORK. 
Emery Tapscott went to Marshall county last 
Tuesday and returned Friday afternoon with over 
300 quails, as the result of Thursday afternoon's 
and Friday morning's hunt. — Paducah, Ky., Dem- 
ocrat. 

I asked him about it and received this 
reply : 

I did kill 300 birds from Thursday morn- 
ing until Friday at 3 o'clock p. m. The 
next morning I killed 8 geese over my 
trained decoy in less than 2 hours. 

E. E. Tapscott, Paducah, Ky. 

This proves that you are another 



At 



RECREATION. 



of the despicable type of swine that insist 
on killing everything they can find, and 
leaving nothing for decent men. It is for 
such as you that game laws are needed, 
limiting the number of birds which any 
man or beast may kill in a day, and I trust 
Kentucky may soon pass such a law. You 
are branded number 884 in the game hog 
pen. — Editor. 

GAME NOTES. 
I carry Recreation with me everywhere 
and enjoy it greatly. Deer are numerous 
here but are fast becoming extinct. One 
family in the vicinity of Hayden lake has 
about 15 hounds and they run deer at all 
seasons. A few days ago I heard the bay 
of hounds 10 miles from any habitation. 
I saw a large white tail buck coming down 
the middle of the stream. His left horn 
was broken off and he was shot through 
the jaws. As I had my 30-30 Winchester, 

1 shot him to keep him from being torn to 
pieces by the hounds close in pursuit. My 

2 partners came along then and we carried 
him into camp. The game season was 
closed but I think I was justified. 

J. B. Hopkins, Rathdrum, Idaho. 



The proprietors of a leading butcher shop, lo- 
cated on Brady street, were felicitating themselves 
Thursday evening on the fine display of game 
they were making to attract holiday customers. 
Yesterday morning the display did not make them 
so happy. It chanced that among the quails, 
ducks and other birds were 6 prairie chickens. 
The latter had been ordered for a certain cus- 
tomer and had arrived Thursday afternoon. They 
were to be delivered yesterday, and in the mean- 
time they were hung up to make as fine a showing 
as possible. However, the law forbids a dealer 
to have prairie chickens in his possession after De- 
cember 1. George Bethel, deputy game warden, 
saw those birds and confiscated them, at the same 
time arresting one of the proprietors of the shop. 
Proceedings were instituted before Police Magis- 
trate Finger, who imposed a fine of $10 for each 
of the chickens, or $60 in all. This amount was 
paid. — Exchange. 



I am trapping wolves and coyotes these 
days, and am having fair success. Some 
letters in Recreation amuse me; for in- 
stance, one from Mr. Heist, of Alberta. 
He claims to kill ducks at 95 yards and 
never shoots at anything under 60 yards. 
Also a letter from a man in New York, 
who looked into a stubble field, saw the 
stubble move, fired, and killed 3 quails. 
Then he stalked another quail that was sit- 
ting on the fence, and wrote to Recreation 
condemning the use of dogs. I have an 
old setter that has forgotten more about 
sportsmanship than that man ever knew. 
I. Northey, Alberta, Can. 



struction of camps. Mow many times has 
a man traveled all day through the woods, 
depending on a certain camp to pass a 
comfortable night in, only to find some 
fool has been there ahead of him and from 
sheer cussedness has broken the windows 
and the stove or torn the door off the 
hinges? This sort of man needs the roast, 
but 9 times out of 10 he hasn't brains 
enough to take it seriously. 

Harry D. Baird, Woodstock, N. B. 



The ideal place to hunt caribou is New- 
foundland. Although the license fee is 
$100, and one is permitted to shoot but 3 
stag caribou, it is worth the money. I was 
there 6 days and during that time saw over 
200 caribou. I had no trouble in getting 
3 ; all having fine heads. Good guides can 
be had reasonable. Caribou are numerous 
and the high license probably protects them. 
I was told by an officer that there would 
be a reduction of the license fee next year. 
Wm. D. Brinnier, Kingston, N. Y. 



This country abounds with chickens, 
quails, jack rabbits, cottontails, wolves, 
and in season ducks. There are a great 
many lakes here containing black bass, 
croppies, pike, pickerel, sun bass, silver 
bass, and perch. During the winter there 
is a great deal of fishing through the ice. 
Only one hook is allowed, with live min- 
nows, and no bass to be kept. 

M. E. D., Onock, Minn. 



I am a reader of Recreation and enjoy 
it much. I am a great lover of the rod and 
gun ; also of fair play to the game. One 
thing that is sadly overlooked is the de- 



THE TRUANT. 
(Reading the Mail.) 

EDWIN L. SABIN. 

Smith says that same darned copper crowd 

Is kicking up a rumpus, 
And that old Colonel Black's allowed 

This time he'll surely bump us ! 
I'll wire Black, thus: "Off Middle Rocks 

(He'll know where! Won't he floun- 
der!) 
While you were fooling 'round with stocks 

I caught a 7-pounder !" 

Nell says Doc Thorne has asked about 

My pesky indigestion; 
He's studied up a cure without, 

He thinks, the slightest question. 
Thanks, Doc and daughter; but I've f.r. 

A diet that just caters; 
A half a dozen fish, well browned, 

Fried onions, pork and 'taters ! 

Wife writes her music-tea was fine, 

And voted swell and pleasant ; 
The Skorski solo was divine, 

And Lord de Whott was present. 
Why, wife, I've got a catbird here 

That knocks that Skorski silly ! 
And as for Lord de Whott, my dear, 

Give me old Injun Billy! 



FISH AND FISHING. 



ALMANAC FOR SALT WATER FISHERMEN. 

The following will be found accurate and val- 
uable for the vicinity of New York City: 

Kingrish — Barb, Sea-Mink, Whiting. June to 
September. Haunts: The surf and deep channels 
of strong tide streams. Baits: Blood worms, 
shedder crabs and beach crustaceans. Time and 
tide: Flood, early morning. 

Plaice — Fluke, Turbot, Flounder. May 15 to 
November 30. Haunts: The surf, mouth of tidal 
streams. Baits: Shedder crabs, killi-fish, sand 
laut. Time and tide: Ebb, daytime exclusively. 

Spanish mackerel — Haunts: The open sea, July 
to September. Baits: Menhaden, trolling — metal 
and cedar squids. 

Striped Bass — Rock Fish, Green Head. April to 
November. Haunts: The surf, bays, estuaries and 
tidal streams. Baits: Blood worms, shedder crabs, 
Calico crabs, small eels, menhaden. Time and 
tide. Night, half flood to flood, to half ebb. 

The Drums, Red and Black. June to Novem- 
ber. Haunts: The surf and mouths of large bays. 
Bait : Skinner crab. Time and tide : Day, flood. 

Blackfish — Tautog, April to November. Haunts: 
Surf, vicinity of piling and old wrecks in bays. 
Baits: Sand worm, blood worm, shedder crabs, 
clams. Time and tide: Daytime, flood. 

Lafayette — Spot, Goody, Cape May Goody. 
August to October. Haunts: Channels of tidal 
streams. Baits: Shedder crabs, sand worms, clams. 
Time and Tide : Day and night flood. 

Croker — July to October. Haunts: Deep chan- 
nels of bays. Baits: Shedder crabs, mussels. 
Time and tide: Day, flood. 

Snapper — Young of Blue Fish. August to No- 
vember. Haunts: P.ivers and all tide ways. Baits: 
Spearing and menhaden; trolling pearl squid. 
Time and tide: Day, all tides. 

Sheepshead — -June to October Haunts: Surf 
and bays, vicinity of old wrecks. Baits: Clams, 
mussels, shedder crabs. Time and tide: Day, 
flood only. 

New England Whiting — Winter Weak-fish, 
Frost-fish. November to May. Haunts: The 
surf. Baits: Sand laut, spearing. Time and tide: 
Night, flood. 

Hake — Ling. October to June. Haunts: Open 
sea surf, large bays. Baits: Clams, mussels, fish. 
Time and tide: Day and night, flood. 

Weak-fish — Squeteague, Squit. June to October. 
Haunts: C Surf, all tideways. Baits: . Shedder 
crabs, surf mullet, menhaden, ledge mussels, sand 
laut, shrimp. Time and tide: Day and night, 
flood preferred. 

Blue Fish — Horse Hackerel. June to November 
1st. Haunts: Surf, open sea and large bays. 
Baits: Menhaden, surf mullet and trolling squid. 
Time and tide: Daytime; not affected by tides. 



JOSH BILLINGS ON TROUT FISHING. 
(From an old newspaper.) 

Brook trout are a spekled institooshun. 

They are more delikate, more nervous, 
and more intrinsik than ennything that 
wears fins or feathers. They are az sudden 
and gamy az a perkushion match, and a 
trout that weighs one ounce will bight hiz 
whole weight, and will bight az fearless 
and sartin az a rattlesnaik. 

A brook trout that weighs 5 ounces will 
pull out ov the water more unwilling than 
a sucker that weighs 2 pound an 3 quarters. 

I don't believe a square orthodox brook 
trout ever weighs more than 2 pound. 

All trout that beat this weight are mon- 



grels, crosst on sum other breed ov a simi- 
lar natur. Scientifick men will teil yu dif- 
ferent from this, but they aint to blame for 
what they don't kno. 

Take a trout out of a mountain brook 
in Nu Hampshire that weighs one ounce, 
and feed him 16 years and yer kant miikj 
him weigh 4 pound and a haff. 

A man who don't hanker hard for the 
sport kant larn to ketch the darling kritters, 
unless it iz in sum far off water, where it 
aint safe to stick yure fingers into the brook 
for fear ov gettin bit bi a trout. \ 

Trout ketchin in the old and well fisht 
streams iz a natral takt, and a man haz got 1 
to be born the right time ov the moon or ' 
he kan never do it hansome. 

Expensive riggin' won't ketch trout enny 
more sertain than a hi priced phiddle will 
play well with the wrong man hold of the 
bow. 

Fly fishin' is konsidered the most poetick 
and at sum seazons ov the year iz the most 
fatal, but the poorist fishermen i have ever 
seen could talk fly fishin' the most numer- 
ously. 

It iz az diffcult to pik out a ded sure day 
to ketch trout az it iz to name a good pik- 
nik day 24 hours in advance. 

I hav seen trout bight az krazy as a mus- 
keto to-day, and to-morrow (the same kind 
ov a day exacly) bight just out ov compli- 
ment to a good fisherman. 

The wind haz more to do with the humor 
ov a trout than enny other outside thing. 

I would az soon think ov goin' to meetin' 
barefoot az to go trout fishin' with a strong 
East wind. 

A bright day, with a clever West wind, 
with plenty of sunshine and shaddo, iz the 
day i bet on. 

The bait on yure hook, and the way it iz 
put on, iz of more consequentz than the 
German silver on yure fishpole. 

The smaller the hook the better for all 
sized trout. 

The quick fishermen are the best ones. 
It iz hard work to outstay a trout or argy 
him out of his opinyun. 

When a trout haz the wonts he haz 'em 
bad, and when he haz the wills yu kant 
stop him. 

The fust drop ov the bate into the hole iz 
the important one. A trout iz the most 
natral ov all fishes, and the more natral the 
bate strikes the riff, or the pool, the better 
understanding at once between yu and the 
fish. 

It allmost spiles a man to ketch one ov 
theze 5 pound lake trout. He kant talk 
well about ennything else afterward less 
than a whale, and he expekts ov course that 



43 



44 



RECREATION. 



hiz nabors will nominate him next fall for 
the Assembly. 

A man who haz caught one ov theze big 
fish iz generally prouder ov it than he iz ov 
his grandfather, and if he ain't a pretty 
well balanced man he will git to talkin' about 
it in sum evenin' meetin'. 

Broiled trout are good, but fride in pork 
juice they are better. 

All fish to be the best should be cooked 
with animile life enuff in them to do their 
own floppin' on the gridiron. 

Ninety-nine big trout out ov every ioo 
are kaught bi mistake, and are az often 
kaught bi barefooted boys with a hum-made 
fish line and a willow pole. 

I hav fisht for brook trout for 40 years, 
and never kaught but one that weighed over 
a pound, and dropt mi pole and line bi the 
side of the hole where i ketched him and 
run home, 3^ miles, with that trout in both 
hands, more exalted than a newly elekted 
constable. 

I never hav fisht for lake trout; i don't 
want to spile mi simplicity for brook trout 
in the hills and meadows. 

What I kno about trout and trout fishin' 
may all be wrong, but i hav'n't got it out 
ov books, but pikt it up az i did mi fust 
pair ov shuze, by workin' for it. 

The only theory i hav in the matter iz 
rllwuss to fill mi basket when i go out, and 
hav often done it in the last hour's fishin', 
when it did seem az though trout waz az 
skar.se az prayers among the nuzeboys. 

I kaught 1492 brook trout last summer 
in the White Mountains, and if I hadn't 
been as modest as a book agent, i should 
have been spilte bi the menny compliments 
i received for mi good luk. 

Next to ketchin' a brook trout that 
weighs a naff pound cums the bliss ov 
bringin' him in to yure hotel. 



LECTURES 0*N FISH AND GAME PRO- 
TECTION. 

One of the required courses in the New 
York College of Forestry of Cornell Uni- 
versity is a course in fish culture and fish 
and game protection. During the spring 
term the juniors and seniors of that col- 
lege are located at Axton, in the heart of 
the Adirondacks, where the college owns 
50,000 acres of forest. There the students 
observe and engage in practical forestry 
operations, observe and study logging, lum- 
bering and milling, and become familiar 
with the details of forestry operations and 
management. 

In the belief that forestry operations 
should not be carried on in a way detri- 
mental to the useful animals inhabiting the 
forest or to the lakes and streams and 
their inhabitants, Dr. Fernow, the director, 
has provided a course of lectures on these 
subjects. The course consists, first, of a 



series of lectures and demonstrations on 
fish culture in which are considered all of 
the important fresh water fishes, particular- 
ly those found in the lakes and streams 
of our forested regions ; second, lectures 
on stream and lake pollution and the ne- 
cessity for their protection; third, lectures 
on American game mammals, birds, and 
fishes, the relation of insectivorous birds 
and other animals to the forest and to agri- 
culture, the principles of game protection, 
and a discussion of game laws and regu- 
lations, including the Lacey law and the 
work of the League of American Sports- 
men. 

In addition to the formal course of 25 
lectures, the students are taken on daily 
excursions to streams, lakes and mountains 
for observation work. The effects on the 
streams of logging and lumbering opera- 
tions are observed, and the fishes, mam- 
mals, birds, plants and other animals of the 
region are studied, thus giving the stu- 
dents training and interest in proper meth- 
ods of nature study. 

This course is given on alternate years 
by Dr. B. W. Evermann, who has just been 
promoted to the position of Assistant in 
Charge, Division of Scientific Inquiry, U. 
S. Fish Commission, and the course is 
unique in American college instruction. 

The importance of instruction along 
these lines is only coming to be appreciated 
and it is a work which other colleges 
would do well to take up. Courses in 
zoology in our colleges deal too largely 
with questions which have no bearing on 
animals as living organisms, many of them 
intimately associated with our physical and 
commercial as well as intellectual well be- 
ing. The natural history spirit needs to 
be fostered ; students, from the grades to 
the universities, need to know more of Na- 
ture, to have a greater love for her chil- 
dren, and an appreciation of their place in 
Nature's economy and our daily life. 

The course this year was given during 
the first 3 weeks of May to a class of 25 
students and professors and proved suc- 
cessful in every way. 



PROBABLY NETTED THEM. 
Your letter to hand asking about catch 
of fish reported to you. The report is true. 
We made the catch in Deer Lodge county. 
20 miles from Anaconda. There were 4 of 
us. My partner and I, fishing one hour 
and 10 minutes, filled our baskets and 
dug holes in the snow and piled them full, 
We used no bait but flies, 2 on each line, 
and about half the time pulled out 2 fish, 
When it was time to go Mr. Conrad took 
off his waterproof coat and piled the fish 
into it. When we reached camp we had 
355 trout about 8 inches long each. Our 
partners returned to camp with a few fish; 



FISH AND FISHING. 



45 



much larger ones than we had but not so 
many. About 2 o'clock we all 4 went out 
again and fished a while. Soon we had as 
many as we thought our friends and our- 
selves could eat. All told, we had 900 as 
nice trout as any person could wish. You 
may not believe this. Many of our friends 
did not, when we came home so soon ; 
but when we opened the boxes and showed 
the telltale hook mark in the mouth of 
every fish they could not help believing. 
James H. Blackbrough, Charles Beaudette, 
Ernest Beaudette, Eugene Conrad. 

Mr. Editor: 

I don't know if you are going to publish 
this or not but if you are in justice to me 
Please fix up a little as i am a verrie poor 
schollar and my friends may see it and the 
way i have of telling it may not look verrie 
well in print but is true in every respect, 
as i could prove by dozens of people here 
now i hope that this is filling the bill as 
you wished it. Yours respectfully, 
James H. Blackbrough, Anaconda, Mont. 

P. O. Box 336. 

P. S. — Annie Inquiries will be cheerfully 
answered by me, cumming from annie per- 
son intrested. Yours, 

J. H. B. 

Blackbrough's report is certainly unique. 
He says he and Conrad took 355 trout in 
one hour and 10 minutes, and that the 
entire catch of the herd was 900 trout. 
This record of 355 trout in one hour and 10 
minutes sounds very fishy. It means about 
one trout every 25 seconds for each man. 
Does anybody believe that story? It 
sounds as if these trout had been netted, 
after all. Men who would make such ra- 
venous hogs of themselves as this crowd 
did, would net trout ; then sit around the 
camp fire and mutilate the mouths of the 
fish if necessary, to try to convince their 
friends that they had taken the fish with 
hook and line. However they may have 
been taken, the performance is disgraceful 
and disgusting in the extreme, and the 
brutes who did the work should be tarred 
and feathered and run out of town. 
Their brands in the fish hog pen are as fol- 
lows : Blackbrough, number 885 ; Charles 
Beaudette, 886; Ernest Beaudette, 887; 
Conrad, 888. — Editor. 



A SURPRISING ADMISSION. 
For several years J. C. Bradley and M. 
S. McCreary, with their families and mine, 
all of Erie, Pa., have camped at the Elms, 
Chautauqua lake. This is a delightful 
place to camp. We have good fishing, pure 
spring water, bathing and clean shores. 
We catch principally black bass and musk- 
alonge. Last season the water was so high 
that fishing was not so good as usual, but if 
we could not catch fish we could at least 



see them. One night 3 of us rowed out in 
front of camp and held 2 bicycle lamps so 
that, they reflected into the water, showing 
us large numbers of bass and muskalonge. 
One big fish jumped clear over the boat. 
We thought it would be profitable to set 
night lines, so the next day we baited about 
100 hooks and as soon as it became dark 
we took the lines, anchors and floats and 
started out to set them. Just then 2 men 
walked out from the road and stood 
watching us. We knew it was against the 
law to set night lines. Finally one of the 
men said, "Well, they are out there for no 
good anyway." We knew we were in for 
a fine of $25 apiece, so we pulled for the 
inlet, jumped ashore, ran about a mile to 
the railway station and returned to camp 
from another direction, taking off our 
sweaters, so the supposed wardens would 
not recognize us. The camp was all light- 
ed up and the ladies were sitting around 
outdoors. Wiping the perspiration from 
our brows, we looked out on the lake and 
beheld our supposed fish wardens spearing 
by torch light. 

T. W. Kelley, Erie, Pa. 

ANSWER. 

I am surprised that you, or any one else 
claiming to be a sportsman, should delib- 
erately engage in a method of fishing that 
you know to be illegal, and I trust that on 
further reflection you may decide never 
again to violate a game or fish law, no 
matter whether in danger of discovery by 
an officer or not. 



TRANSPORTATION COMPANIES PLEASE 
READ. 

The following letter explains itself: 
General Manager, 

Lake Keuka Navigation Co., 

Hammondsport, New York. 
Dear Sir : 

A member of the League of American 
Sportsmen, in Rochester, has sent me a 
leaflet, which bears the signature of your 
company, showing on one side a picture 
of 2 men and a lot of trout laid out on 
the ground. On the reverse side is a state- 
ment that these 56 lake trout weighed 164 
pounds, and that they were caught in a few 
hours. 

My correspondent writes a severe criti 
cism of your company for exploiting the 
work of the 2 fish hogs shown in this 
picture, and you may rest assured that this 
circular will impress all clean, decent 
sportsmen who see it in the same way that 
it does him and me. For many years it has 
been the custom of certain transportation 
companies to send out such pictures in the 
way of advertising their respective terri- 
tories ; but of late, a number of companies 
have quit this entirely because they have 
found that instead of attracting good 



4 6 



RECREATION. 



sportsmen, such documents repel them. I 
am the editor and publisher of Recre- 
ation, a magazine which has a circulation 
of 65,000 copies a month, and I rarely miss 
an opportunity of publicly rebuking men 
who make such catches of fish as are 
shown in this picture, or who kill excess- 
ive numbers of game and then have them- 
selves photographed with it. Such ex- 
hibitions are repulsive and disgusting to 
decent sportsmen and the sooner all man- 
agers of transportation companies learn 
this the sooner will they succeed in secur- 
ing the approval and the patronage of the 
better class of sportsmen. Yours truly, 

G. O. Shields. 



FISH HOOK BOOK. 
726,509. — Combined Card and Book for 
Holding Fish Hooks. Albert W. 
Connor, St. Louis, Mo., assignor to 
Simmons Hardware Company, St. 
Louis, Mo., a Corporation. Filed De- 
cember 22, 1902. Serial No. 136,094. 




Claim. — 1. A combined card and book 
for fish hooks, the card divided into sec- 
tions by perforations, a single flap pro- 
vided with perforations coincident with 
the perforations of the card, gummed to 
the body of the card at several points to 
form a plurality of pockets at one end of 
the card to receive the loop ends of the 
leaders, and a single flap at the other end 
of the card also provided with perfora- 
tions coincident with the perforations of 
the card and adapted to be folded over 
on to the body of the card to cover the 
hooks. 



in April Recreation, were well timed. His 
more conspicuous personal qualities are 
self conceit and a tendency to slop over. 
The first named prevents his having a 
realizing sense of his frequent indis- 
cretions, while the second is continually 
leading him into new difficulties. After 
being forced to pay a large sum in a suit 
for slander some 2 years ago, he had the 
sublime nerve to run for the city council 
at the last municipal election. Need- 
less, to say, he was snowed under 
Now comes this show up of his 
sportsmanship in Recreation, and we can 
easily imagine the rest. Just how much 
publicity of this type he can stand and re- 
fuse to accept the lesson is, of course, a 
problem; but it is safe to say he has 
enough "to hold him for a while" and that 
caution and moderation in sport will have 
a significance new to him. 

It is pleasant to find the enlightened and 
superior Swedish residents in universal 
support of Recreation's position and to 
hear, as I have heard, a generally ex- 
pressed sentiment that Hanson got what he 
needed most — a call down. 

Subscriber, Worcester, Mass. 



GRAHAM WAS DEFEATED. 

Your article in the June number of 
Recreation, entitled "Salt Porkers," deal- 
ing with the extraordinary catch of 2,304 
pounds of kingfish in one day by ex-Con- 
gressman William H. Graham and his 
friend, and the sale of the fish afterward 
to a fish dealer, concludes with the state- 
ment that Mr. Graham's election to Con- 
gress is a disgrace to the sportsmen of 
Pittsburg and vicinity. Mr. Graham was 
defeated for Congress last November by 
the well known sportsman, George Shiras, 
III, whose work with the camera and wild 
game photography is so often commended 
in your journal. Kindly make the above 
correction in justice to all true sportsmen 
of Pittsburg and vicinity. 

Meredith R. Marshall, 

Pitsburg, Pa. 



SCORES HANSON. 
From all I can learn, your remarks con- 
cerning Hanson, the Massachusetts fish 
hog, whom you so appropriately roasted 



YIELDED GRACEFULLY. 
A farmer in this vicinity posted a stream 
running through his lands with the usual 
notices forbidding fishing. But in his case 
prohibition did not prohibit. For 2 seasons 
he tried valiantly, but vainly, to protect 
the stream, and prosecuted several tres- 
passers without obtaining satisfaction. The 
third year he retired from the contest and 
tacked on his sign boards the following : 
Notice ! 
"Fish and be Damned ! 
"Dig worms anywhere in the garden." 
T. A, Waterman, Johnson, Vt. 



GUNS AND AMMUNITION. 



Anybody can shoot all day, but a gentleman will quit when he gets enough. 



THE EXPERIENCE OF J. D. BUCK. 
King and Bartlett, Maine. 
Marlin Fire Arms Co., 

New Haven, Conn. 

Dear Sirs : 1 had an experience with one 
of your .30-30 rifles last fall, and as 1 am 
highly pleased with the outcome, I think 
it but just I should tell you about it. 

There had been no rain for many days ; 
the fallen leaves had become so dry and 
crisp that but little care was required for 
one to keep at a distance from all things 
one wishes to avoid. I had been roaming 
several days over the higher ridges, trying 
my antlers against sundry saplings and 
longing for a chance to test them in conflict 
with an antagonist worthy of them and me. 

On the day of which I am telling I left 
my usual fall haunts on King and Bartlett 
mountain and went to lower ground. I 
circled around Little King lake and took 
to the top of 'he "horseback," which ex- 
tends for a way parallel to Spencer steam. 
The day was bright and the sky cloudless. 
By the middle of the forenoon it was so 
hot that had there been a few black flies 
pestering me, I should have thought it 
surely was lily-pad time. As I weigh some- 
thing like 300 pounds, my exercise had 
warmed me up and I began to be uncom- 
monly thirsty. On one side of where I 
stood was low ground with almost stag- 
nant and unpleasant tasting water ; while 
on the other side was the sparkling, cool 
Spencer stream. I immediately started for 
the good water, keeping a sharp lookout 
for anything suspicious. 

I had just reached the bank of the stream 
and was putting my head down to drink 
when a strange looking log, with a squat, 
thick, limblike growth sticking up at each 
end, came silently and swiftly around the 
bend above me. 

Great guns, how it startled me ! The log 
swung .instantly head toward me. I could 
not make out just what it was, although 1 
studied it carefully while it drifted swiftly 
toward me. There was a movement in the 
forward hump and I could see a smaller 
limb, with a little black hole in its center, 
which was pointed directly below the hand- 
some patch of white on my throat. 

"Now give it to him, Belcher !" came 
from the rear stump, and I suddenly real- 
ized that the log was a canoe, and what I 
had taken for squat limbs were in reality 
those horrid smoky smelling beings that 
walk on their hind legs and are called men. 
I thought my doom was sealed and even 
when I heard a sharp little click, such as 
one pebble makes when falling on another, 

47 



I did not have power to move, even to save 
my life. 

"Jack in another," came from the rear 
again, and the man in front made a louder 
clicking. 

"Dod blast the blank, blank thing; it's 
stuck !" the front man said. A shiver ran 
over me, I came to myself and with 2 
mighty bounds was back in the thicket, 
well hidden and safe. 

My curiosity caused me to linger a few 
minutes in the vicinity, and I learned from 
what the men said, although much it would 
never do to repeat, that the man in the 
stern had warned his companion to get 
ready for just such an opportunity as that 
which I gave them, and was taking him 
severely to task for not having had his rifle 
loaded. The other asserted in no uncer- 
tain tones that he had filled the magazine 
with cartridges and had pumped one into 
the chamber, or at least he had worked the 
lever, and, of course, supposed he had 
loaded the weapon. He went on to say 
that I had stood like a blamed fool while 
he had snapped once and thrown down the 
lever to reload, and had the action worked 
properly my name would surely have been 
Dennis. 

I gathered that the rifle was made by 
yon, was brand new, and although they 
decided it wasn't fit to take into the woods, 
yet it meets not only with my entire ap- 
proval, but also the hearty commendation 
of those of my friends to whom I have re- 
lated this incident. 

May your business so increase that 
in the years to come every hunter who 
journeys this way will carry one of your 
rifles ! 

Yours thankfully, 

James Dandy Buck. 



A .303 TARGET. 
I am much interested in guns and ammu- 
nition, and that is where I commence to 
read Recreation as soon as I have taken 
a look at the pictures. I often see the 
question _ asked, "What is the best all 
around rifle?" The question implies a gun 
to use on large game and on small game 
as well. I am partial to the 303, as the 
cartridge is, to me, the best for large 
game up to the 30-40. If the 303 is large 
enough for the heavy shooting, surely the 
100 grain bullet and 3 to 5 grain miniature 
powder is small enough and cheap enough 
for anything; and I have found it accurate 
for close work. With my first 303 I shot 
one inch to the left and one inch low for 
every 10 yards. That called for a separate 



RECREATION. 



sight for those loads. Then I got a 30-30 
but had the same trouble. Now I have a 
new 303 octagon Savage and the line is so 
nearly the same I do not use any extra 
sight. It does fairly well, as per target 
enclosed, when yon take into considera- 
tion that I am an old man and did not 
use a dead rest although I did steady the 
muzzle on a twig. 

I find a great difference in different 
makes of cartridges for the same gun; 
for instance, for 303 one make measures 
less than 308, although the caliber of a 303 
measures 308. The bullet should fill, to 
get all the benefit of the gas and rifling. 
The full jacket of the same company's 
make measures .311. Why this discrep- 
ancy? If .311 is right for full jacket, what 
is wrong about having same size for soft 
nose, for this is the game bullet and we 
need all the force and tearing power pos- 
sible for large game. Then it does not 
stop too quickly with these small calibers. 
The smaller copper jackets do not take 
the same line vertically or horizontally 
We are too apt to condemn a good gun 
because we have bought a cartridge not 
well adapted to the gun. In order to get 
loads that take same line I have been 
obliged to buy one make of expansive and 
another of full jacket. The new Savage 
rear sight will simplify matters somewhat 
in the matter of different loads. 

I have yet to find a company so willing 
to do all that is right in regard to their 
guns as the Savage Arms Co. I had one 
of their guns that was faulty to some ex- 
tent, and I wrote them in regard to it. 
They wrote me to send the gun in, and 
they put in a new barrel, a new cartridge 
carrier and refinished the gun through- 
out, returning it free of charge. I only 
asked that the chamber be changed slight- 
ly. The magazine had always been satis- 
factory ; but the new carrier is an improve- 
ment to anyone who is careless in hand- 
ling the gun. I could not but compare 
the action of the Savage Company with 




that of the Snarlin people, as reported 
when their guns are sent back. 

The enclosed target was made at 30 
yards without going to target, and with 
the same sight and no change from 100 
yards. This knocks my former theory 
out, for neither of my other rifles would 
have put the lead nearer than 3 inches of 
the center of mark. Some one tell why. 
Stubb, Orwell, Ohio. 

DEFENDS THE PUMP GUN. 

I saw a scathing letter in Recreation 
signed "Double Barrel," against the pump 
gun, which might have been written more 
guardedly and have conveyed the desired 
effect. The pump gun is the gun for those 
who know how to use it properly. For 
instance, when a covey scatters, the 
U6er may come on a pair, get both, and an- 
other may get up at a little distance which 
possibly he may also bag; but the average 
shooter fires to kill, not to wound. 

I have had experience at all sorts of 
game in Scotland, including pheasants, part- 
ridges, black game, woodcock, ducks, snipe, 
hares and rabbits. Reckless shooting at 
wide ranges, say 50 yards and upward, is 
disliked, and if persisted in results in the 
shooter being omitted from the next shoot- 
ing party. 

I have had opportunity of seeing battues 
where the birds came overhead at a great 
pace and the shooters were crack shots 
who fired anywhere from 5,000 to 15,000 
shots a year. A shooter would have 3 
double barrel guns and 2 loaders beside 
him and would hit bird after bird in the 
head, leaving the body fit for table use and 
not a mess of bones, lead, feathers and 
flesh. I mention this as I consider the head 
the proper part to shoot at and it is a 
small target at 30 or 40 yards. 

I have killed a pair of birds at a moder- 
ate range with one shot or a bird at long 
range, but in both instances it was met 
with criticism. My opinion of true sports- 
men in this country, whether they use the 
pump gun or the double barrel, is that they 
lack nothing, comparing them with British 
sportsmen. 

As regards W. E. Heist's statement that 
a charge from a 16 bore gun goes faster 
and does more effective killing than from 
a 12 bore, I consider that no<nsense. 
Charge and loading have a lot to do 
with the effectiveness of a gun, but in 
99 cases out of 100 it is the man who is at 
fault. 

In India 28 bores are largely used for 
shooting snipe; weight $V 2 poundfs, 
charge, 28-30 grains G. C. or Shultze pow- 
der and 94 ounce shot. I have had 
experience in bringing some of those 
smart little gentlemen to bag. I have had 
to wait often on lost birds till the retriev- 



GUNS AND AMMUNITION. 



49 



ers brought them to bag, the result of a 
long chance shot, which caused vexa- 
tion among the party of shooters. If 
deer shooters would go after a good 
head with horns which, if properly mount- 
ed, would be a pleasant reminder, instead 
of killing does in the majority of cases, it 
would be preferable. 

J. L. Tait, Holyoke, Mass. 



THE SAVAGE COMPANY REPLIES. 
In the March issue of Recreation W. A. 
Cone denounced a Savage rifle and the 
makers therof, in severe terms. When 
the Savage people read the article they 
wrote me as follows, regarding it: 

We have always understood that Recre- 
ation was a debating ground on which 
sportsmen might air their complaints, ad- 
vance ideas and suggestions. Anything 
that has been written about our goods, 
good or bad, we have taken in the right 
spirit, and we intend to do so in future. 

We are aware that in all man's work 
nothing is perfection, and that there are 
as many opinions as there are mina\s. 
Recreation is the only journal that caters 
to the ideas and opinions of the sporting 
public. You have certainly built up the 
magazine on these grounds, and, of course, 
the protection of game. Your work on 
these lines must always redound to your 
credit. Your work is also, to a certain ex- 
tent, influencing other sportsmen's journals, 
although they would dislike to acknowledge 
it. We often notice that they omit game 
hog photographs, which accompany some 
writer's vainglorious description; and the 
explanatory notes under such illustrations 
as they now publish are often modified 
far beyond their former tones. 

While you have lost the ads of a few 
manufacturing concerns, who have be- 
come piqued at adverse criticisms, on the 
whole you should be the gainer, because 
of the general interest these discussions 
have created throughout the country. 

We would never dream of withdrawing 
our ad because of your publishing criti- 
cisms against our arm. On the contrary, 
we have always used any criticism that has 
appeared for the purpose of obviating the 
troubles and faults that will crop out in 
any manufacturing business. 

We are now making improvements in 
our rifles, slight, perhaps, in themselves, 
but always important, that have been sug- 
gested by readers of Recreation. 

We have gained a great deal of busi- 
ness and reputation by your publishing so 
many communications from the owners of 
Savage rifles who are well satisfied with 
them. Savage Arms Company. 

Arthur Savage, Managing Director, Utica, 

N. Y, 



PISTOL POINTS. 

What is the best manner of holding a re- 
volver? How is it possible to rind out if 
the bullets are shaved in passing through 
the barrel ? How can I tell whether the 
barrel is loaded, and how can leading be 
removed? Would it be advisable to put a 
little gun grease on each bullet used? 

Harry Aughe, Dayton, O. 

ANSWER. 

The correct manner of holding a revolver 
is to grip the handle firmly with the thumb 
extending horizontally along the frame on 
the left hand side arid the trigger finger 
resting lightly on ti e trigger when the 
hammer is set. The revolver should not 
be grasped so tightly as to cause the hand 
to tremble, but with just a firm, comforta- 
ble grip. To get good results, it is neces- 
sary to hold the weapon with the same de- 
gree of firmness and in identically the same 
way for each shot ; otherwise there will be 
variation in the elevation. The secret of 
good shooting is to press the trigger gradu- 
ally and let the revolver off with a squeeze 
of the hand rather than by a direct pull, 
keeping the sights in correct alignment 
while the pressure is being increased on 
the trigger. 

"Shaved bullets" are bullets shot from 
a revolver in which the chamber of the 
cylinder does not align perfectly with the 
bore of the barrel. This is not likely to 
happen with a revolver of standard make. 
You can determine whether the bullet is 
shaved or not by shooting it into a roll of 
cotton batting or soft cloth. Either mate- 
rial will not distort the bullet. 

Leading of the barrel can be readily seen 
by any one who has had practice in inspect- 
ing barrels. Originally the grooves, as well 
as the lands, are bright when thoroughly 
clean and free from oil. When leaded, the 
grooves will have a duller finish apparent 
on the surface. A good way to remove a 
slight coat of lead is to fill the barrel with 
mercury and let it stand until the lead 
coating is removed. In shooting important 
matches, many expert shots use brass 
brushes, which are effective in removing 
any leading that may occur while shoot- 
ing. If the bullets in the cartridges are 
greased with gun grease before firing them, 
the ammunition will work much cleaner 
than otherwise. — A. L. A. H. 



LOADS. 



Some readers of Recreation owning 30- 
30 rifles have possibly wished to use light 
loads for small game or for short range 
target work without having to buy special 
bullet molds, etc. I have been experiment- 
ing a little, and have at last found a load 
ikzJt ° c is accurate up to 100 yards as any 
cartridge in the market. I use the regu- 
lar 30-30 shell, with 7}^ grains DuPont 



50 



RECREATION. 



No. I Smokeless Rifle powder; and, in- 
stead of using the ioo grain bullet, I use 
the full sized bullet cast by the regular 30- 
30 tool, 10 parts of lead to one of tin. This 
makes an excellent cartridge for shooting 
rabbits, squirrels, and for range work up 
to 100 yards. There is hardly any report, 
and no leading of the gun. Of course all 
30-30 rifles, when using lead and tin bul- 
lets, should be cleaned after 8 or 10 shots, 
to prevent leading. 

I had a Marlin rifle, but got rid of it as 
quickly as I could. The person I sold it 
to also disposed of c immediately, saying 
it was not fit to kiii pigs with. I belong 
to the South Side Lifle Club, which bars 
Marlin rifles ; Winchester, Savage and 
Stevens being the only guns used. Shells 
of 30-30 caliber loaded with low pressure 
powder, have to be resized when used in 
Marlin rifles, but never when used in the 
Winchester. 

For a more powerful cartridge, and one 
as accurate as the 32-40 and the 38-55, at 
300 yards, use 15 grains DuPont No. 1 
Smokeless Rifle powder, and the regular 
sized bullet, cast, 10 to one. When trying 
these cartridges use the Lyman rear sight, 
as the 2 loads, having a trajectory not 
nearly so flat as that of the regular high 
pressure shells, require greater elevation 
than can be obtained with an ordinary rear 
sight. 

H. L. Yance, Racine, Wis. 



"If you shoot me with that and I find it 
out I'll kick the d — out of you." 

Will some of the Middle Falls readers 
please awake Mr. Bodge? He has been 
dreaming long enough. 

F. M. O., Anaconda, Mont. 



DISAGREES. 

In Recreation I notice S. B. H., of North 
Rome, Pa., gives his opinion to S. O. In- 
galls in regard to fox loads and to Nimrod, 
in regard to 28 and 30 inch guns. S. B. 
H. says his experience with a 38 inch bar- 
rel has been that it will shoot 1-3 
stronger than the 28 inch. Therefore, if 
an extra 2 inches over a 28 inch gun will 
shoot 1-3 stronger, a 32 inch ought 
to shoot 2-3 stronger, which would 
leave the 28 inch gun out of it entirely, ac- 
cording to mathematics. What a gun the 
34 inch would be compared with a 28 inch, 
according to S. B. H. ! My experience has 
been that a 30 inch may throw shot 2 
inches farther than a 28 inch. S. B. H. 
says the longer powder is confined the 
more force it has. I again disagree. The 
harder it is confined the better results it 
will give. 

D. S. Bodge tells us all about that 22 
of his. It must be a terror to penetrate 
36 inches of oak plank. Mr. Bodge must 
have shot down hill. Those silvertips he 
speaks of must have been young raccoons, 
and it is a wonder they did not get savage 
when he commenced on them with a 22. 
A Montana barroom bum threatened to 
shoot a cowboy with a 22 and the cowboy 
said, 



ENDORSES ROBIN HOOD POWDER. 
Robin Hood smokeless powder for shot 
guns is strong, clean and quick, and the 
manufacturers have resolutely kept out of 
the combine into which the Peters and 
other cartridge companies have gone. 
Robin Hood powder took my fancy from 
the start and I have used many hundred 
loads of it with excellent results. It is a 
moist burning powder, and shoots with 
great velocity and little recoil. It is load- 
ed by bulk measure and as high as 3^2 
and 3^4 drams may be fired in a 12 bore 
without discomfort. The Robin Hood 
people are also putting on the market their 
factory loaded shells and these can now 
be obtained from local dealers. This pow- 
der is strictly an Eastern product, made in 
Vermont and little known in the West. 
However, it is safe to say that it will be 
received with satisfaction by sportsmen 
who want a good thing. The primers in 
the Robin Hood factory loads are made 
by Eley, in London, and are quick and 
strong, making a hard hitting, quick load. 
If any of the Eastern readers of Recrea- 
tion have ever used Robin Hood I wish 
they would let me know how they like it, 
and we can compare results. 

Chas. H. Morton, Topeka, Kans. 



CONDEMNS THE MARLIN. 
As a sportsman, I was greatly impressed 
with the truth and importance of Mr. A. 
L. Vermilya's article in January Recrea- 
tion. It has been my fortune for the past 
5 or 6 years to do some big game shooting, 
and last summer a friend and I decided 
to seek bears in the mountains of Northern 
California. We were armed with 2 Win- 
chesters and a Savage, but my guide shot 
a Marlin. It was my first and I trust will 
be my last experience with that gun. After 
leaving Sisson we crossed several ranges of 
the Sierra Nevada mountains and at an alti- 
tude of about 5,000 feet encountered our 
first game, 2 rattlers. My guide attempted 
to kill them, but his rifle jammed com- 
pletely. Our next experience with the gun 
was on Cliff lake, where he lost a golden 
cause. Now, had it been his misfortune to 
meet a grizzly under similar circumstances, 
the result we might well imagine. If we 
sportsmen are shooting large and danger- 
ous game our lives frequently depend on the 
rapid and accurate action of our fire arm ; 
and when we realize the serious conse- 
quences that might follow the jamming of 



GUNS AND AMMUNITION. 



5* 



a rifle at a critical moment, can we take the 
chance ? 

Jas. C. Stark, M.D., West Phila., Pa. 



DEFENDS THE SAVAGE. 
Replying to G. W. McHay, Kelseytown, 
Minn., who criticised the Savage, I have 
owned 2 .303 Savage rifles, and have never 
used any rifle more to my liking. For 
shooting, neatness and perfection of bal- 
ance, they are uneqnaled, while for pene- 
tration the Savage people guarantee 50 
inches of white pine, with full mantled 
bullet of their own make; and their word 
is good. The soft point will penetrate a 
5-16-inch steel boiler plate. If the trigger 
lock works loose and the trigger pulls too 
hard, a remedy is to take off the buttstock, 
exposing most of the lock. Cut a piece of 
rubber the right thickness to fit in the 
slotlike screwhead in the rear of lever 
lock ; or a piece thick enough to make the 
trigger lock extend enough to work at the 
desired pressure. To make the trigger 
pull easier, hold trigger back with finger, 
which will pull the sear down until it can 
be reached with a small file. Round off 
the corner next to the magazine slightly, 
closing the action, now and then trying the 
pull until it suits. It may be cut down to 
almost a hair pull if desired. This was my 
treatment for 2 Savage rifles. 

C. E. Wilson, Mt. Carbon, Colo. 



SMALL SHOT. 
In experimenting with a 30-30 Winches- 
ter carbine, using Winchester and U. M. C. 
factory-loaded, soft point bullets, I fired 
at Y% inch iron plates, at 10 paces. The 
bullets made dents y<\ inch deep and y 2 
inch in diameter. Firing at a ^ inch iron 
plate, the same distance, the bullets cut 
clean holes y> inch in diameter and car- 
ried the pieces of iron punched out 2 
inches into hard pine. Reloaded shells, 
using factory-made bullets and 27 grains 
Savage smokeless powder, would not go 
through % inch iron. Went through 3-16 
iron after bending the plate badly. Was 
this the fault of the powder, or because 
the Winchester reloading tool does not 
crimp the bullet tight in the shell? Bul- 
lets fired into soft pine mushroomed beau- 
tifully, but one fired at a 16 inch cedar 
telegraph pole went through it and 4 inches 
into a clay bank without expanding. The 
soft point was worn off even with the 
copper jacket, which goes to show that 
you can not tell what a bullet will do. 

W. A. Trussell, Chicago, 111. 



that caliber be reloaded with smokeless 
powder? 

Bernard Andrews, New Durham, N. J. 

I referred this to the Winchester people, 
whose reply follows: 

The penetration of the 56-50 Spencer at 
100 yards we find to be 8 %-inch pine 
boards. This, of course, might vary con- 
siderably as the lumber varies, but think 
this is a good average result. With regard 
to reloading these shells with smoke- 
less powder, we can only say that it has 
never been done, and in our judgment it 
would be unwise to do so, as the initial 
pressures generated with smokeless pow- 
ders would probably be great enough to 
rupture the shell about the head. This 
cartridge was, of course, made up for black 
powder, and no attempt has been made to 
adapt it to smokeless. — Editor. 



I notice in the February number of 
Recreation "Enrique" claims that the Sav- 
age miniature bullet is worthless beyond 25 
yards. After reading that, I took my 
model '99 Savage, and went out to prove 
that he is wrong. The following was the 
result: Four bullets were fired at a target 
100 yards' distant ; one struck y 2 inch from 
the center, one 1^2 inches from the center, 
one 2^4 inches and one 3^2 inches. I then 
fired 4 bullets at a target 150 yards distant. 
One bullet struck the target 1^/4 inches 
from the center, one 3 inches, another 
3Y 2 inches, and the 4th struck above the 
target. I then fired 2 shots with a 200- 
yard range. One struck 2> Z A inches from 
the center, and the other missed the target, 
but struck above it. 

All the bullets were the Savage miniature 
.303, and were fired without using a rest. 
A. D. Ostrander, Franklin, N. Y. 



Can you tell me the penetration, at 100 
yards, of the 56-50 Spencer cartridge made 
by the Winchester Company? Can shells of 



I am not much of a hunter, nor a crack 
shot, but am fond of a good rifle. I have 
owned lots of them ; Remingtons, Spencer, 
Maynard, Evans, Colt, Chaffee-Reece, Stev- 
ens, Hopkins & Allen, Sharps, Quacken- 
bush, Springfield, F. Wesson, and most 
all models and calibers of repeating and 
single shot Winchesters. I now have a 
Winchester, '94 model, 30-30 carbine, and 
would not swap it for anything I ever used,. 
It just fills the bill and is light and hand- 
some. _ I use all kinds of loads, from 6 to 
30 grains of either black or smokeless pow- 
ders, _ and am satisfied that the little car- 
bine is O. K. for any game to be found in 
New England. The Savage is also a great 
rifle. Recreation is all right. Could not 
get along without it. 

Leman Dawes, Harrison, Me. 



I consider the Lee straight pull, 6 mm, 
the nicest little saddle gun, the longest 



52 



RECREATION. 



range and the quickest killer I ever used. 
I began 22 years ago in this same locality 
with a 44 flat Henry. Since then I have 
used all kinds of arms, including 30-30 
Winchester, Marlin and Savage, and last 
and best, the Lee straight pull. I killed 2 
bears last fall with the latter, smashing the 
skulls completely. I have made 4 hunts on 
the Western slope, and have killed most 
varieties of Colorado game. I never had 
trouble with the Lee or Marlin 30-30, much 
as the latter is condemned in Recreation. 
Both arms are easy to clean, while if you 
are out in a wet snow or rain with a Win- 
chester or Savage you can put in the rest 
of the day or night getting them in condi- 
tion again. 

Whort, Rosenberg, Tex. 



The Peters Cartridge Co. gave a shoot 
at Carthage, Mo., Sept. 19 and 20, under 
the management of Sam Norton. Pump 
guns were plentiful and I took particular 
note of their working with Peters Weal 
shells. With the Winchester pump no 
trouble was experienced; but the Marlins 
failed to extract the Ideal shell in almost 
every case. I think the Ideal shell would 
work well in any gun if it had a heavier 
rim. On the last day of the shoot I used 
2 boxes of Peters Ideal shells loaded with 
354 ounces of shot. Several of the shells 
blew off just above the base. 

J. W. Dawson, Joplin, Mo. 



I noticed an article in November Rec- 
reation from J. C. Davis, of Etna, Wash., 
saying that he failed to get his deer after 
it had been shot through both shoulders 
with a 30-30 Marlin. That shot should 
have dropped the deer in his tracks, but it 
is surprising how far an animal will some- 
times travel after receiving a mortal 
wound. I do not think the length of the 
barrel had anvthing to do with this par- 
ticular shot, but if Mr. Davis wishes a 
rifle for heavy shooting he should hark 
back to the 40-65, 45-70 or 45-90 Winches- 
ter. 

Charles Cooley, Chicago, 111. 



11 I read your magazine each month with 
great interest, especially the gun and am- 
munition department. I am sorry to see the 

_ Peters Company acting as they are. They 
fully deserve all that has been said of them 
and more. I find their shells unreliable, as 
many miss fire. The Winchester repeater 
shells are ideal, and give splendid results. 

- If the Peters Company would only take 
advantage of the kindly criticism in Recre- 
ation and remedy the defects in their 
goods instead of taking offence, it would 
be far more beneficial to them. 

M. H. Davis, Fayette, Mo. 



I should like to ask Double Barrel, who 
writes so disparagingly concerning the 
pump gun, if he is sure of killing his bird 
at every shot? As a rule, in wing shooting, 
the bird comes down at the first shot; but 
what if the second barrel should wound a 
second bird? With the pump there is a 
third shell ready to do a humane act. The 
pump is superior to the double barrel be- 
cause it affords a 3 to 1 chance in killing 
the wounded bird or birds. For that rea- 
son I consider the pump the most humane 
gun on the market. 

Repeater, Marblehead, Mass. 



725,883. — Gopher Gun. Cortland Sims, 
San Jose, Cal. Filed November 13, 
1902. Serial No. 131,138. (No 

model.) 




Claim. — 1. A breech loading gun, con- 
sisting of a barrel, a firing pin and opera- 
tive means therefor, said barrel having a 
closed muzzle end and a discharge at right 
angles to its axis, etc. 



I notice in your April issue an inquiry 
from A. W. Crampton, St. Albans, Vt., 
about Robin Hood smokeless powder. 1 
have used Robin Hood smokeless shells, 
both "factory loaded and those I have load- 
ed myself. I find them not only equal to 
Winchester and U. M. C. shells, but far 
better. I have had excellent results with 
their 2^ drams i% ounce 7^ shell loaded 
by Robin Hood Powder Co. for shooting 
blue rocks and 3% load for game. 

Harry Harrison, Rochester, New York. 



Why is it dangerous to use smokeless 
powder in a black powder gun, if the quan 
tity of smokeless used gives the same ve- 
locity? 

Wm. Sweet, Ithaca, N. Y. 

ANSWER. 

There is no increase of danger in the use 
of the smokeless powders manufactured by 
this company over the dangers of black, if 
our loading instructions are followed 
strictly. 

Laflin & Rand Powder Company. 



I should like to hear from those who 
have had experience with the new Winches- 
ter special .32, .33 and .35 calibers, 
likewise the 38-72 box magazine. Which is 
preferable, the box or the tube magazine? 
Roy E. Marston, Concord, N. H. 



I should like to have owners of the 
Colt Patent new lightning sporting rifle 
give their experience in using that arm. 
E. J. Pratt, Rushville, N. Y. 



't 1 



NATURAL HISTORY. 

When a bird or a wild animal is killed, that fs the end of it. If photographed, it may still live and its 
educational and scientific value is multiplied indefinitely. 



MULE DEER AND BLACKTAIL. 
I notice your remarks in Recreation 
about mule deer being called blacktail deer. 
What are the distinguishing features of 
each? Is not a mule deer hornless? Are 
whitetail deer also mule deer? 
Recreation is doing a valuable work. 
E. P. C, Santa Rita, N. M. 

ANSWER. 

Here are some extracts from "The Big 
Game of North America," which answer 
fully your inquiry as to the identity of 
the mule deer and the blacktail deer. Re- 
ferring to these 2 species of deer the 
author says : 

Tn the Rocky mountains, where the true 
blacktail deer is not known, the mule deer 
is still" called the blacktail deer. On the 
Pacific coast, where the mule deer ranges 
with the Columbia blacktail, it is known by 
its true name, mule deer, by which desig- 




Mu!e Deer, 
nation it is also recognized by naturalists. 
The original habitat of the mule deer has 
not been much restricted since its first dis- 
covery, though it has deserted or become 
scarce on the Missouri river and other 
hunted localities where the white man has 
too much disturbed its seclusion. Its nat- 
ural home is in the mountains, but it is 
found on the great plains, hundreds of 
miles East of them, where it most affords 
the broken and arboreous borders of the 
streams. 

"West of the Rocky Mountains, the mule 
deer is met with almost everywhere. In 
the Coast range, North of San Francisco, 



it is almost entirely replaced by the Colum- 
bia blacktail deer, and South of that point 
this variety entirely gives place to the Cali- 
fornia variety. In Oregon, Washington, 
and in British Columbia, the mule deer is 
met with, but not so abundantly as in the 
mountains farther East. 

"In the face of civilization, the mule 
deer maintain their ground better than 
the elk. In flight, they do not run like 
the common deer, but bound along, all 
the feet leaving and striking the ground 
together. For a short distance the flight 
is rapid, but soon seems to lag. Once, 
when sitting on a crag in the Rocky moun- 
tains 10,000 feet above the sea, I watched 
a mule deer, which had been started by a 
companion, as it bounded through the val- 
ley 1,000 feet below. In a run of half a 
mile, he showed evident fatigue. That the 
labor of such a motion is greater than that 
of the long, graceful leaps of the common 
deer, must be manifest. 

"The limbs of the mule deer are larger 
and coarser than those of the common deer. 
The mule deer are less agile and elastic in 
their motions, and are less graceful in 
form. Their large, disproportioned ears 
are their ugliest feature, and give tone to 
the whole figure. 

"The summer coat is a pale, dull yellow. 
Toward fall, this is replaced by a fine, 
short, black coat, which rapidly fades to 
gray. As the season advances, the hairs 
of the winter coat grow larger, and so be- 
come more dense, as well as of a lighter 
color. Usually, in the forehead is a dark, 
bent line in the form of a horseshoe, with 
the toe downward. The brisket and belly 
are black, growing lighter toward the um- 
bilicus ; thence, posteriorly, a still lighter 
shade prevails, till, at the inguinal region, 
a dull white obtains. Between the thighs 
it is quite white, widening toward the tail. 
This white portion extends to one inch 
above the tail, where it is 6 inches broad. 
Lcwer, it is 8 inches broad, and lower still, 
between the legs, it contracts to 4 inches in 
breadth. Viewed posteriorly, this white 
patch is a conspicuous object. Below the 
knees and elbows, the legs are of a uniform 
dark cinnamon color." 

The foregoing quotation is from the 
chapter on the mule deer. 

Here is an extract from the chapter on 
the Columbia blacktail deer: 

"By far the most common member of this 
family, on the Pacific slope, is the Colum- 
bia blacktail deer, so named because it 



53 



54 



RECREATION. 




Black-tailed Deer. 

was first noticed by Lewis and Clarke, 
while they were in the region of the great 
river of that name. This animal is to be 
met with from Lower California to Cook's 
Inlet, in Alaska. In the Rocky mountains 
and headwaters of the Missouri river, the 
mule deer is frequently mistaken by hunt- 
ers for the blacktail. This mistake is par- 
donable, for the mule deer also sports some 
black on his fly-disturber, if it may be so 
designated. One of the infallible proofs 
of the distinctiveness of the 2 species is 
that the tail of the mule deer is naked on 
the under side, while that of the blacktail 
is entirely clothed with hair. Jn color, the 
female blacktail is almost identical with the 
male. The antlers of a full grown buck 
consist of 2 main beams, which spring 
backward and upward from the head, and 
from each of which spring one to 6 tines, 
according to the age of the individual. The 
antlers of this species are not nearly so 
large and majestic as those of the mule 
deer. When a blacktail buck is one year 
old he has 2 spikes rising from his head ; 
when he is 2 years of age these spikes will 
each have a branch, and when he is 3 years 
old there will be 3 pommels to each horn. 
After this, the age of the animal can not 
be reckoned with any degree of certainty." 

Judge Caton gives this description of the 
Columbia blacktail deer: 

"Less in size than the mule deer. Short 
body and short legs. Ears large, but less 
in size than those of the mule deer. Eyes 
large and brilliant. Tail short and round. 
One-fourth of the circumference of the tail 
on the under side is white ; the balance is a 
tawny dull black. The black is of the 
deepest shade on the lower part. Metatar- 
sal gland between the tarsus and the mid- 
dle of the leg is intermediate in size be- 
tween those on the mule deer and those on 



the Virginia deer. Tarsal gland much the 
same in size and form as on those 2 spe- 
cies, and a shade lighter than the 
surrounding coat ; color of body a tawny 
gray, with white on back part of belly and 
inguinal region, extending to root of tail. 
The face is gray, with darker forehead. 
Under the head, white. Legs generally of 
a uniform dark cinnamon color, not a 
white hair to be found on them below 
the hock. Antlers once or twice bifur- 
cated. Gait like that of the mule deer. Is 
found on the Pacific coast of the United 
States and British Columbia only; having 
the most limited range of all the deer found 
in the United States, and perhaps on this 
continent." 

I trust these data may settle, in the minds 
of Recreation readers, the question as to 
the actual difference in characteristics and 
in range between the mule deer, which is 
that found throughout the Rocky moun- 
tains, and the blacktail deer, which" is the 
form found only on the Pacific slope.— 
Editor. 



A BIRD WITH MANY NAMES. 

If one is fortunate enough to be in the 
country during the lovely days of June, he 
can make the acquaintance of the merriest, 
happiest and most musical of the oriole 
family. Who can imitate or describe the 
song of the bobolink? The most rippling, 
cheerful, thankful little voice that ever 
soared to heaven. Robert Lincoln, as he is 
sometimes called, usually appears in New 
England in May, dressed in a most attract- 
ive wedding suit of black, buff and white. 
He is not so large as his brothers in the 
family (Icteridae) who are familiar to us, 
except the orchard oriole. He is not nearly 
so large as the American robin, who boasts 
10 inches, for the bobolink measures only 
6 J /> to 7. Yet he presents a striking ap- 
pearance as he darts here and there in 
search of food. He has a black head, chin, 
tail, wings and under parts ; buff edges to 
some of the tail and wing feathers, the 
rump and upper wing coverts being white ; 
but the crowning glory of his attire is the 
buff spot on the back of his neck, which is 
described in "Citizen Bird" as looking like 
a cream cake baked just right. 

Have you seen a bobolink's nest? It is 
said that "Whoever would find one must 
have the patience of an Indian, the eyes of 
a bird, and the cunning of a fox." The nest is 
usually placed in low meadows or hay fields 
and is .composed of twigs and tufts of grass 
built loosely together. The clutch consists 
of 4 to 6 eggs, gray in color, with cloudy 
brown markings. The pair are too wise 
ever to fly directly into or out of the nest, 
but on wishing to enter they dive into the 
grass some distance from their home and 



NATURAL HISTORY. 



55 



slip along beneath the waving, green tops, 
unperceived by the human eye. 

The sojourn of the bobolink with us is 
short, and he is the first bird to leave the 
choir. Being a good little patriot, he waits 
for the Fourth of July celebration. Then 
he retires to the marshes, with scores of 
his own kind, and emerges in August a 
changed bird. In his place of seclusion he 
has left his entrancing voice and gay at- 
tire, and donned a traveling suit of brown, 
with a little yellow and white trimming, 
and a striped Tarn o' Shanter. He can 
hardly be distinguished from his mate, who 
always wears a plain suit to avoid being 
conspicuous. The migratory spirit is upon 
him, and a long journey is in prospect, so 
he tries to tell us all about it, with his lit- 
tle metallic note of farewell, "Chink, tink, 
tink, chink." For a time he lingers among 
the wild rice swamps, and is known as the 
reed bird ; but the autumn winds have 
whispered to him that the rice fields of 
South Carolina and Georgia are in per- 
fection. The tall stalks of grain are "in 
the milk," and no daintier food could be 
desired by the most fastidious bobolink. 
Even those far off in Utah come back by 
way of the East, and travel South by the 
old pathway. What is this strange migra- 
tory instinct which Nature bestows on her 
winged children, which prompts these 
feathered mites to journey thousands of 
miles each year without chart or guide? 

Our New England bobolink joins those 
of his kind, and together they travel, high 
above the earth, toward the South. Flocks 
of these sober, little brown birds arrive at 
the rice plantations, and though gunners 
and minders are there to frighten them off, 
yet the destruction to the crops is so great 
that the loss reaches millions of dollars an- 
nually to the planters. Some of the planters 
consume ioo pounds of gunpowder a day, 
often with only blank cartridges, to drive 
away these depredators. Fires are kept 
burning at night, but all in vain, for rice 
birds will risk their lives for a good meal. 
Of course, many a rice bird, or ortolan, 
as he is now called, is killed and served at 
dainty repast; while at the restaurants reed, 
or rice, birds sell for 50 cents a skewer. 
When in the early autumn one sees on the 
menu card, "Cronstades of reed birds," let 
him remember that he is eating the joy- 
ous songster who fills our hearts with the 
uplift of his thankful spirit in the early 
days of summer. 

Our little friend does not linger long at 
the plantation, for he has appointments 
with flocks of his kind from all parts of the 
United States to meet in Florida. It seems 
as if it were an autumnal convention of the 
bird with many names. When all affairs of 
this branch of the bird kingdom are settled, 
the travelers start for their winter home, the 



majority going first to Jamaica. There na- 
ture has prepared a dainty repast for them 
in the seeds of the guinea grass. On this 
diet they grow so plump that epicures like 
them for the table, and they are known 
there as butter birds. If they go to Cuba, 
they are called Chamber gos. The journey 
is not yet over, for they have no intention 
of wintering in the West Indies, because 
their ancestors never did so, hence they 
plume themselves for the long flight of 400 
miles across the Caribbean sea to Venezu- 
ela. From there they hasten on to South- 
western Brazil, where they spend Christ- 
mas, hang up their stockings, and order 
their new spring suits of black, white and 
buff. The bobolink is one of the few birds 
that moult completely twice a year. 

It seems as if they give themselves no 
time for rest, for they are back again in 
Florida quite early, where they are called 
May birds, and with a strange foreknowl- 
edge, they arrive at the rice plantations 
just in time to revel in the young, green 
shoots of the rice plant, which are peep- 
ing above ground. The planters are obliged 
to order out their minders to save their 
crops from utter destruction. By the middle 
of May our own little bobolink is wooing 
his mate in his Northern home, and plan- 
ning his housekeeping in perhaps the same 
spot where we first made his acquaintance. 

What a traveler he has been ! He holds 
steam and electric cars in contempt. Un- 
hampered by tickets or trunks, he has 
passed over hills and valleys, rivers and 
streams, cities and plains, a distance of 
4,600 miles, to the South, and when the 
homing instinct asserts itself, he returns as 
fresh and gay as when he caroled his 
cheery songs to us a year ago. 

Caroline F. Little, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



A CAPTIVE CONDOR. 
Two newspaper items recount interfer- 
ence with trolley and railway traffic in the 
United States by birds. In the first case 
a blue heron short circuits the city wires 
in Utica, N. Y., and in the second an owl 
gets mixed up with a switch point on the 
Mobile & Ohio railway. Nothing so small 
as a mere handful of feathers could hold 
up a train on the Guayaquil & Quito rail- 
way. When the regular passenger train on 
the mountain division pulled into Alausi 
the other day, somewhat late, the train 
crew proudly displayed a condor, securely 
tied, and explained the delay by telling 
how this bird was found in a railway cut 
some miles down the line, occupying the 
space reserved for running trains, and un- 
able or unwilling to leave; so the train 
hands roped it and brought it to the termi- 
nal station, where it now occupies a fore- 
most place in the growing collection of 
Ecuadorian fauna at headquarters' camp. 



56 



RECREATION. 



From beak to end of tail the bird measures 
4 feet, one inch, and for the wing expanse 
10 feet. This is rather larger than the 
measurements usually given in reference 
books. A condor killed in Riobamba, Prov- 
ince of Chimborazo, Ecuador, in the sum- 
mer of 1901, measured 14 feet from tip to 
tip. For a bird supposed to spend most of 
its time sitting around on inaccessible and 
lofty crags, or in giving the American 
eagle points on high flying, it shows httle 
fear, rather indifference, in the presence 
of man, allowing its neck and head to be 
stroked and its wings to be handled. A bite 
from its beak, with which it cracks small 
bones, would be no joke, so this familiarity 
is not without a spice of risk. In its wild 
state its food is probably the same as that 
of other sorts of carrion birds, as it lacks 
the hunting traits of the hawk and eagle 
kind, and a look at its feet, which resemble 
nothing so much as those of the domestic 
turkey, is proof that it could never seize 
and carry away a living animal. The alti- 
tude above the sea where this bird was 
captured is about 5,000 feet, and others have 
been seen and shot in the same vicinity, 
but the condor doubtless ranges much 
higher, if we are to believe Malte-Brun 
(Book 86), who says of this huge bird of 
the Andes that his "broad pinions bear him 
up in the atmosphere to the height of more 
than 20,000 feet above the level of the sea." 
Dr. S. A. Davis, 
Chief Surgeon, G. & Q. Ry. Co., 
Alausi, Ecuador, S. A. 



HABITS OF THE SQUlKREL. 
There are few squirrels in this locality 
and those are of the fox species only. Once 
I was hog enough to kill every one I could 
find, but of late years I have been as big 
a crank the other way, giving them all the 
protection possible. In the timber oppo- 
site my house a few of the pets make their 
homes. Being undisturbed, they have be- 
come quite tame and are daily visitors to 
the yard, skipping about the trees or gath- 
ering nuts scattered on the ground for 
them. After they have eaten their fill they 
busy themselves in burying the remainder. 
They dig little holes in the ground or snow 
with their fore feet, and after pushing the 
nut down, root the dirt back with their 
noses and pat it down with their fore paws, 
so that a keen eye is required to locate the 
caches. In drinking at the horse tank, 
they dip their noses in the water and lap 
it up just as a dog does. They also eat 
salt and often we see them gnawing at an 
old salt barrel head. If no nuts are scat- 
tered for them they unearth those buried 
on former days. They are selfish and some- 
times have lively frghis over a nut. 1 



favor a law to prohibit killing squirrels. 
I endorse the L. A. S. and enjoy the man- 
ner in which you roast the porkers. Is 
there a law in Indiana prohibiting the use 
of ferrets? Several are kept here. Game 
is not abundant. 

James P. Ewing, Tracy, Ind. 



NATURAL HISTORY NOTES. 

I think it is rats and porcupines that 
gnaw the elk and deer horns after they are 
shed, and that most of this is done the 
first winter the horns lie out. I have sel- 
dom seen antlers gnawed, but have seen 
many skulls with horns attached that were 
badly eaten. You can find hundreds of shed 
horns in this country that have not been 
touched, and as horns are not shed till 
March or later it seems clear that the var- 
mints eat them the first winter they are 
dropped. But few elk have been killed 
here for the teeth. A few have been killed 
for bear bait, but we have not had any 
game wardens here till last year, and they 
were not allowed any salary. We all know 
how poorly men work without pay. 

Go after Marlin and his shooting irons 
till he makes them right. They will not 
always feed as they should. 

Felix Alston, Irma, Wyo. 



R. B. Stowers says he never saw a squir- 
rel drink. I have never seen them drink 
water, but have seen their tracks to open 
water in winter. I have more than once 
seen them sitting on spiles, helping them- 
selves to the sap as it ran down into the 
bucket. If a squirrel can not get a tree 
already tapped, he does the job himself. 
I have watched them do it. Selecting a 
small tree or the limb of a large one, the 
squirrel gnaws through the bark and a 
little way into the wood, near the top of 
the tree or limb, and lets the sap run down. 
Then, starting at the bottom, he climbs 
slowly up, licking the sap off as he goes, or 
sits below the notch and catches the sap 
as it runs down. Do not kill the squirrels. 
C. F. Coleman, Winnipeg, Canada. 



I have read with much interest the arti- 
cles in Recreation about coons. I have 
hunted coons 4 years, and not until last 
fall have I heard a coon call. I caught 
one in a trap and he made a noise some- 
thing like the call of a screech owl. I 
had a tame coon, but he never uttered any 
kind of a call. I have some good coon 
hounds and should like to correspond with 
other coon hunters who are readers of 
Recreation. 

Ben Wieth.orn,_ Watson, Iowa. 



THE LEAGUE OF AMERICAN SPORTSMEN. 



GENERAL OFFICERS 

President, G. O. Shield, 23 W. 24th St., 
New York. 

1st Vice-President, E. T. Seton, 80 West 
40th St., New York. 

2d Vice-President, W. T. Hornaday, 2969 
Deca tur Ave., Bedford Park, N. Y. 

3d Vice-President, Dr. T. S. Palmer, 
Dept. of Agriculture, Washington, D. C. 

4th Vice-President, A. A. Anderson, 80 
West 40th St., New York 

5th Vice-President, Hon. W. A. Rich- 
ards, General Land Office, Washington, 
D. C. 

Secretary, A. F. Rice, 155 Pennington 
Ave., Passaic, N. J. 

Treasurer, Austin Corbin, of the Corbin 
Banking Co., 192 Broadway, New York 
City. 

ALASKA DIVISION. 

Dr. E. M. Rininger, Chief Warden, Nome. 

ARIZONA DIVISION. 

M. J. Foley, Chief Warden, Jerome. 

ARKANSAS DIVISION. 

Wo R. Blockson, Chief Warden, Eureka Springs. 

CALIFORNIA DIVISION. 
Dr. David Starr Jordan, Chief Warden, Leland 
Stanford University. 

COLORADO DIVISION. 
A. Whitehead, Chief Warden, 303 Tabor Building, 
Denver. 

CONNECTICUT DIVISION. 
Hon. F. P. Sherwood, Chief Warden, Southport; 
Dr. H. L. Ross, Vice-Warden, Canaan; H. C. Went, 
Sec.-Treas., Bridgeport. 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA DIVISION. 
C. H.Townsend, Chief Warden, U. S. Fish Com- 
mission. 

FLORIDA DIVISION. 
W. W. K. Decker, Chief Warden, Tarpon Springs 

GEORGIA DIVISION. 
J.J. Doughty, Chief Warden, Augusta. 

IDAHO DIVISION. 
L. A. Kerr, Chief Warden, Kendrick 

ILLINOIS DIVISION. 
M. D. Ewell. M.D., Chief Warden, 59 Clark St., 
Chicago; F. M. Taber, Vice Warden, 144 Kinzie 
St., Chicago; G. C. Davis, Sec.-Treas., 123 S. Central 
Ave., Austin. 

INDIANA DIVISION. 
Frank L. Littleton, Chief Warden, 30^ East 
Washington St., Indianapolis ; J. J. Hildebrandt, 
Vice Warden, Logansport ; T. J. Carter, Sec.-Treas., 
State House, Indianapolis. 

IOWA DIVISION. 
Carl Quimby, Chief Warden, Des Moines; C. C. 
Proper, Sec.-Treas., Des Moines. 

KANSAS DIVISION. 

O. B. Stocker, Chief Warden, Wichita; A. J. 
Applegate, Sec.-Treas., 113 E. 1st St., Wichita 
KENTUCKY DIVISION. 
Geo. C. Long, Chief Warden, Hopkinsville. 
R. L. Brashear, Sec.-Treas., Bowiing Green. 

MAINE DIVISION. 
Col. E. C. Farrington, Chief Warden, Augusta. 

MARYLAND DIVISION 
JT. E, Tylor, Chief Warden, Baltimore. 
MASSACHUSETTS DIVISION. 
Heman S, Fay, Chief Warden, Hazleton Block, 
Marlboro; J.E. Tweedy, Vice- Warden, North Attle- 
boro ; A, C. Lamson, Sec.-Treas., 194 Main St., 
Marlboro. 

MICHIGAN DIVISION. 

) . Elmer Pratt> Chief Warden, Grand Rapids ; R. S 



Woodliffe, Vice-Warden, Jackson ; A. B. Richmond, 
Sec.-Treas., Grand Rapids. 

MINNESOTA DIVISION. 

Dietrich Lange, Chief Warden, 2294 Commonwealth 
Ave., St. Paul. 

H. A. Moigan, Vice- Warden, Albert Lea; Prof. 
O. T. Denny, Sec.-Treas., St. Paul. 

MISSOURI DIVISION. 

Bryan Snyder, Chief Warden, 726 Central Bldg., 
St. Louis. 

MONTANA DIVISION. 

Professor M. J. Elrod, Chief Warden, Missoula; 
Sidney M. Logan, Vice- Warden, Kalispell ; R. A. 
Waagner, Sec.-Treas., Bozeman. 

NEBRASKA DIVISION. 
Fred. E. Mockett, Chief Warden, Lincoln ; P. 
O'Mahony, Sec.-Treas., Lincoln. 

NEVADA DIVISION. 
Dr. W. H. Cavell, Chief Warden, Carson. 
Geo. W. Cowing, Sec.-Treas., Carson. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE DIVISION. 
Dr. A. F. Barrett, Sentinel Bldg., Keene, 
Sidney Conant, Sec.-Treas., Keene. 

NEW JERSEY DIVISlor. 
Percy Johnson, Chief Warden, Bloomfield; Dr. 
W. S. Colfax, Vice-Warden, Pompton Lakes; I. 
V. Dorland, Sec.-Treas., Arlington. 

NEW MEXICO DIVISION. 
W. M. Borrowdale, Chief Warden Magdalena. 

new york Division. 
John R. Fanning, Chief Warden, Powers' Bld«:., 
Rochester; Col. K. E. Moss, Vice-Warden, Wallack's 
Theatre, New York City; Dr. C. C. Curtis, Sec.- 
Treas., Columbia College, New York City. 
NORTH DAKOTA DIVISION. 
Dr. W. D. Jones, Chief Warden, Devil's Lake. 
' OHIO DIVISION. 

W. E. Gleason, Chief Warden, Mitchell Bldg., 
Cincinnati; A. C. Thatcher, Vice- Warden, Urbana. 

OKLAHOMA DIVISION. 
W M. Grant, Chief Warden, Oklahoma City. 
ONTARIO DIVISION. 
C A. Hammond, Chief Warden, Box 701, St. 
Thomas; D. L. Mells, Sec.-Treas., St. Thomas. 
OREGON DIVISION. 
Robert F. Kelly, Chief Warden, Box 188, The 
Dalles; C. B. Cushing, Sec.-Treas., The Dalles. 
PENNSYLVANIA DIVISION. 

C. F. Emerson, Chief Warden, 189 N. Perry St., 
Titusville; Hon. C. B. Penrose, Vice- Warden, 1723 
Spruce St., Philadelphia; E. Wager-Smith, Sec.- 
Treas., 1026 Ridge Ave., Philadelphia. 

RHODE ISLAND DIVISION. 
Zenas W. Bliss, Chief Warden, 49 Westminster St., 
Providence. 

SOUTH CAROLINA DIVISION. 
C. F. Dill, Chief Warden, Greenville. 

SOUTH DAKOTA DIVISION. 

D. C. Booth, Chief Warden, Spearfish ; John C. 
Barber, Sec.-Treas., Lead. 

TENNESSEE DIVISION. 
Hon. G. C Martin, Chief Warden, Clarksville ; 
Hon. Austin Peay, Jr., Sec.-Treas., Clarksville. 
TEXAS DIVISION. 
Prof. S. W. Stanfield, Chief Warden, Weatherford; 
W. E. Heald, Sec.-Treas., San Angelo. 
UTAH DIVISION. 
Hon. John Sharp, Chief Warden, Salt Lak*» City. 

VERMONT DIVISION. 
W. E, Mack, Chief Warden, Woodstock; S. C; 
White, Sec.-Treas., Woodstock. 

VIRGINIA DIVISION. 
R. G. Bickford, Chief Warden, Newport News. 
C. O. Saville, Vice Warden, Richmond; M.D.Hart, 
Sec.-Treas., 1217 East Main St., Richmond. 
WASHINGTON DIVISION. 
F. S. Merrill, Chief Warden, Spokane ; F. A. Pon- 
tius, Sec.-Treas., Seattle; Munro Wyckoff, Vice-War- 
den, Pt.Townsend, 



57 



53 



RECREATION. 



WEST VIRGINIA DIVISION. 

E. F. Smith, Chief Warden, Hinton, 

WISCONSIN DIVISION. 
Frank Kaufman, Chief \\ arden, Two Rivers; Dr. 
A. Gropper, Sec.-Treas., Milwaukee. 

WYOMING DIVISION. 
H. E. Wadsworth, Chief Warden, Lander; Frank 
Bond, Sec.-Treas., Cheyenne. 

Applications for membership and orders /or badges 
should be addressed to Arthur F. Rice, Secretary, 23 W . 
St., New I ork. 



County. 
Hamilton, 



Name of Warden. 
W. C Rippey, 



LOCAL 
County. 
New York, 
Livingston 



Albany, 



WARDENS IN NEW YORK. 
Name of Warden. Address. 

Conrad L. Meyer, 46 W. Broadway. 

M. De La Vergne, Lakeville. 

K.S. Chamberlain, Mt. Morns. 

Henry Skinner, Springwater. 
Dr. J. W. Cowan, Geneseo. 

C. D. Johnson, Newtonville. 

Kenneth E. Bender,Albany. 
Broome, John Sullivan, Sanitaria Springs 

" R. R. Mathewson, Binghamton. 

Cayuga, H. M. Haskell, Weedsport. 

Chemung, Fred Uhle, Hendy Creek, 

M. A. Baker, Elmira. 

Cortland, James Edwards, Cortland, 

Erie, E. P. Dorr, 103 D. S. Morgan 

Building, Buffalo. 

Marvin H. Butler, Morilla. 

W. H. Broughton, Moriah. 

Jas. Eccles, St. Regis Fails. 

Charles \M Scharf, Canajoharie, 

J. M. Scoville, Clinton. 

Wilson Urans, Middletown. 

J. Hampton Kidd, Newburgh. 

Thomas Harris, Portjervis. 

Lewis Morris, Port Richmond. 



Essex, 

Franklin, 

Montgomery, 

Oneida. 

Orange, 



Richmond, 

St. Lawrence, Dr. B.W. Severance, Gouverneur. 



Schenectady, 
Suffolk, 

u 

Tioga, 
Washington, 



Westchester, 



Dutchess, 
Columbia, 
Onondaga, 
Yates, 

Dutchess, 



A. N. Clark, 
J. W. Furnside, 
F. J. Fellows, 
P. F. Tabor, 
Geo. Wood, 
C.L.Allen, 

A. S. Temple, 

J. E. Barber, 

George Poth, 

Chas. Seacor, 

M. W. Smith, 
Ralph Gorham, 

} A. B. Miller, 

James Lush, 

B. L. Wren, 
Symour Poineer, 

Chas. H. DeLong, 
Jacob Tompkins, 



Sevey. 

Schenectady. 

Central Islip, L. I. 

Orient, L. 1. 

Owego. 

Sandy Hill. 

Whitehall. 

Dresden. 

Pleasantville- 

57 Pelham Road, 

New Rochelle. 
Croton Falls. 
Mt. Kiscj 



Memphis. 
Penn Yan. 
Branch Port. 
Pawling. 
Billings. 



Ulster, 
it 

Jefferson, 

Herkimer, 

Oswego, 

Putnam, 

Schuyler, 

Allegany, 

Schoharie, 

Warren, 

Orleans, 

Greene, 

Hamilton, 



Stark, 
Franklin, 

Cuyahoga, 

Clark, 

Erie, 

Fnlton, 



W. S. Mygrant, 

P. A. Geepel, 

L. B. Drowne, 

M. A. DeVall, 
Wm. S. Mead, 
C. J. Smith, 
D. F. Sperry, 
J. E. Manning, 
H. L. Brady, 
G. C Fordham, 
G. A. Thomas, 
O. E. Eigen, 
Geo. McEchron, 
J. H. Fearby, 
W. J Soper. 
David Aird, Jr., 



46 Elton Street, 
Brooklyn. 
473 Grand Ave., 
Astoria, L. I. 

119 Somers Street. 
Brooklyn. 

The Corners. 

Woodstock. 

Watertown. 

Old Forge. 
154 West Utica St. 
Mahopac Falls. 
Watkins. 
Belvidere. 
Sharon Springs. 
Glen Falls. 
E. Shelby. 
Windham. 
Lake Pleasant. 



LOCAL WARDENS IN OHIO. 



A. Dangeleisen, 
Brook L. Terry, 

A. W. Hitch, 

Fred C. Ross, 

David Sutton, 

L. C. Berry, 



Massillon. 

208 Woodward Av. 

Columbus. 
161 Osborn St., 
Cleveland. 
169 W. Main St., 

Springfield. 
418 Jackson St., 

Sandusky. 
Swanton. 



Address. 
4465 Eastern Ave 

Cincinnati. 
Lima. 

Mt. Vernon. 
Elyria. 



Allen, S. W. Knisely, 

Knox, Grant Phillips, 

Lorain, T.J.Bates, 

Ottawa, Frank B. Shirley, Lakeside. 

Muskingum, Frank D. Abell, Zanesville. 
Scioto, J. F. Kelley, Portsmouth. 

LOCAL WARDENS IN CONNECTICUT. 
Fairfield, George B. Bliss, 2 Park Row, Stam- 

ford, Ct. 
11 Park St., Bridge- 
port, Ct. 
Box 373, btratford. 
P. O. Box 100, Ca- 
naan, Ct. 
Sandford Brainerd, Ivoryton. 
Wilbur E. Beach, 318 Chapel Street, 
New Haven, Ct, 
D. J. Ryan, 188 Elizabeth St.. 

Derby. 
LOCAL WARDENS IN MASSACHUSETTS. 
Norfolk, Orlando McKenzie, Norfolk. 

J.J. Blick, Wrentham. 

S. W. Fuller, East Milton. 

Suffolk, Capt. W. J. Stone. 4 Tremont Row, 

Boston. 
Worcester, B. H. Mosher, Athol. 



Fairfield, 
Litchfield, 

Middlesex, 
New Haven 



Harvey C. Went, 

Samuel Waklee, 
Dr. H. L. Ross, 



Mercer. 



Morris, 



LOCAL WARDENS IN NEW JERSEY. 



Edw. Vanderbilt, 
Roland Mitchell, 



Somerset, 

Sussex, 

Union, 

Warren, 

Monmouth" 
Hudson, 

LOCAL 
Jefferson, 
Perry, 
Warren. 



Dentzville, 

Trenton. 
739 Centre St., 

Trenlcii 
Trenton. 
Pompton Plains 
Dover. 
Butler. 
Hibernia. 
Somerville. 



F. C.Wright, 
Joseph Pellet, 
Chas. W. Blake, 
Francis E. Cook, 
Calone Orr, 

G. E. Morris, 
Isaac D. Williams, Branchville 

* A. H. Miller, Cranford. 

CM. Hawkins, 
(Jacob Young, 
I Reuben Warner, 

Dory-Hunt, 

A. W. Letts, 



Roselle. 

Phillipsburg. 

Wanaque. 



51 Newark St., 

Hoboken 



WARDENS IN PENNSYLVANIA. 



Jackson's Corners- J un iata, 



Venango, 
Potter, 



Queens, Gerard Van Nostrand. Flushing, L. I . Crawford, 



Cambria, 

Butler, 

Allegheny, 

Beaver, 

McKean, 



Lackawanna, 

Carbon, 
Cumberland, 
Wyoming, 
Tioga, 

Lycoming, 

Delaware, 

Montgomery, 

Bradford, 

Clarion, 

Cameron, 

Clinton, 

Northumber- 
land, 
Elk, 
Fayette, 



John Noll, 
Samuel Sundy, 

F. P. Sweet, 
Nelson Holmes, 
Clifford Singer, 
Ezra Phillips, 

G. D. Benedict, 
Ira Murphy, 
Wiley Barrows, 
Chas. Barrows, 
Jasper Tillotson, 
Geo. T. Meyers, 
J. B. Lamb, 
W.H.Lambert, 



Sykesville. 

Lebo. 

Goodwill Hill. 

Cornplanter. 

Oakland Mills. 

McAlesterville. 

Pleasantville. 

Coudeisport. 

Austin. 

Austin. 

Tillotson. 

Titusville. 

Buel. 

.720 Coleman Ave. 

Johnstown. 
Murrinsville. 
Natrona. 
Beaver Falls. 



F. J. Forquer, 
S.H.Allen, 
N. H. Covert, 
W. R. Keefer, 
C. A. Duke, 
L. P. Fessenden, 
Wm. Holsinger, 
Wm. Weir, 
Wm. Major, 
Asa D. Hontz, 
J.C. Gill, 
Cyrus Walter, 
E. B. Beaumont, Jr., 
G. H. Simmons, 
Jas. J. Brennan, 
B. D. Kurtz, 
Walter Lusson, 
L.C. Parsons, 
Geo. B. Loop, 
Isaac Keener, 
Harry Hemphill, Emporium. 
M.C.Kepler, Renovo. 

Geo. L. Kepler, Renovo. 
(G. W. Roher, 

I c;o5 Anthracite St., Shamokin 

D. R. Lobaugh, Ridgway. 
Ely Cope, Cadwallader. 



Duke Center. 
Granere. 

Stickney. 
Moosic. 

East Mauch Chunk. 
Mechanicsburg. 

Tunkhannock. 

Lawrenceville. 

Westfield. 
Oval. 
Cammal. 
Ardmore. 
Academy. 
Say re. 
New Bethlehem 



THE LEAGUE OF AMERICAN SPORTSMEN. 



59 



LOCAL WARDENS IN MICHICxAN. 
County. Name of Warden. Address. 

Ottawa, W.H.Dunham, Drenthe. 

Kalamazoo, C. E. Miller, Augusta. 

Berrien, W. A. Palmer, Buchanan. 

Cass, Thomas Dewey, Dowagiac. 

Hillsdale, C.A.Stone, Hillsdale. 

Lake, John Trieber, Peacock, 

LOCAL WARDENS IN VIRGINIA. 
Mecklenburg, J.H.Ogburn, South Hil. 

King William, N.H Montague, Palls. 

Smythe, J.M.Hughes, Chatham Hill. 

King & Queen, K. D. Bates, Newtown. 

Louisa, J. P. Harris, Applegrove. 

Henrico, W. J. Lynham, 412 W. Marshall. 

Richmond. 
East Rockingham, EJ.Carickhoff, Harrisonburg. 

LOCAL WARDENS IN WYOMING. 
Fremont, Nelson Yarnall, Dubois. 

Uinta, {!;?;. F^son, } J ackson " 

Carbon, Kirk Dyer, Medicine Bow. 

Laramie, Martin Breither, Cheyenne. 

LOCAL WARDENS IN TENNESSEE. 
Sumner, W. G. Harris, Gallatin. 

Stewart, I onn H. Cory, Bear Spring. 

Robertson, C.C.Bell, Springfield. 

Montgomery, P. W. Humphrey, Clarksville. 

Madison, H. T. Rushing, Jackson. 

LOCAL WARDENS IN NEBRASKA. 
Hall, E. C. Statler, Grand Island 

LOCAL WARDENS IN NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

Cheshire, S. C. Ellis, Keene. 

Sullivan, G. A. Blake, Lempster. 

" J. W. Davidson, Charlestown. • 

LOCAL WARDENS IN VERMONT. 
Rutland, Wm. J. Liddle, Box 281, Fair Haven 

Windsor, F. A. Tarbell, U est Bridgewater. 

Orleans, E.G.Moulton, Derby Line. 

Essex, H. S. Lund, Granby. 

LOCAL WARDENS IN ILLINOIS. 
Rock Island, D. M. Slottard, 12th Ave and 17th 

St., Moline. 
Iroquois, J. L. Peacock, Sheldon. 

LOCAL WARDENS IN OKLAHOMA. 
Kiowa and Comanche Nation, 

A.C.Cooper, Ft. Sill. 

LOCAL WARDENS IN IOWA. 
Clinton, D. L. Pascol, Grand Mound. 

Pottawattamie, Dr. C. Engel, Crescent. 

LOCAL WARDENS IN WASHINGTON. 
Okanogan, James West, Methow. 

Stevens Co., Jacob Martin, Newport. 

LOCAL WARDENS IN UTAH. 
Washington, S. C. Goddard, New Harmony. 

" J.A.Thornton, Pinto. 

LOCAL WARDENS IN KANSAS. 

Ness, Frank Lake, Ransom. 

LOCAL CHAPTERS. 

Albert Lea, Minn., H. A. Morgan, Rear Warden 
Angelica, N. Y„ C. A. Lathrop, 
Augusta, Mont., H. Sherman, " 

Austin, Minn., G. F. Baird, " 

Austin, Pa., W.S.Warner, 

Boston, Mass., Capt. W. I. Stone, 

Buffalo N.Y., H.C.Gardiner, 

Cammal, Pa., B. A. Ovenshire. " 

Champaign Co., O, Hy. F. MacCracken 

Urbana, " 

Charlestown, N. H., W. M. Buswell, 
Cheyenne, Wyo., J. Hennessy, " 

Choteau, Mont., G. A. Gorham, " 

Cincinnati, Ohio, B.W.Morris, " 

Coudersport, Pa., 1. L. Murphy, 
Cresco, Iowa, J. L. Piatt, " 

Davis, W.Va., J. Heltzen, 

Dowagiac, Mich., W.F. Hoyt, " 

East Mauch Chunk, Pa., E. F. Pry, 
Evansville, Ind„ F. M. Gilbert, 
Fontanet, Ind„ W. H. Perry, 

Ft. Wayne, Ind , W. L. Waltemarth 
Great Falls, Mont., T. M. Gaunt, 
Heron Lake, Minn., "K. C. Buckeye, 
Hollidaysb'g, Pa., T. J. Hemphill 
Hookinsville, Ky., Hunter Wood, J 

Indianapolis, Ind., Joseph E. Bell, 
Terome, Ariz., Dr. L. A. Hawkins, 

Tohnsonburg, Pa., W. J. Stebbins, 
Kalispell, Mont., Tohn Eakright, 
Keene, N. H.. F. P. Beedle, 



Kingfisher, Okla., A.C.Ambrose, Rear Warden. 
Lake Co., Ind., Dr. R. C. Mackey, " 

Lawton, O.T., Marion Miller, ' " 

Lincoln, Neb., A.J.Sawyer " 

Logansport,Ind., E. B. McConnell, " 

Ludington, Mich., G. R. Cartier, " 

Mechanicsburg, Pa., Dr. J. H. Swartz, " 

Minturn, Colo., A.B.Walter, 
Morgantown, W. Va., B. S, White, 
New Albany, Ind., Dr. J. F. Weathers, " 
New Bethlehem, Pa., Isaac Keener, " 

Oklahoma City O.T.. N. F. Gates, 
Penn Yan, N. Y., Dr. H. R. Phillips, 
Phillips, Wis., F. K. Randall, 

Princeton, Ind., H.A.Yeager, " 

Reynoldsville, Pa., C. F. Hoffman, " 

Ridgway, Pa., T.J.Maxwell, 

Rochester, N. H, Gustave Andreas, " 

N. Y., C. H. McChesney 
St. Paul, Minn., O. T. Denny, 
St. Thomas, Ont., L.J.Hall, 
Schenectady, N. Y., J. W. Furnside. " 

Seattle, Wash., M. Kelly, 

Syracuse, N. Y., C. C Truesdell, 
Terre Haute, Ind., C. F. Thiede, " 

The Dalles, Ore., C. B. Cushing, 
Walden, N. Y., J. W. Reid, 

Wichita, Kas., Gerald Volk, 

Winona, Minn., C. M. Morse, " 

DISCOUNTS TO LEAGUE MEMBERS. 

The following firms have agreed to give 
members of the L. A. S. a discount of 2 
per cent, to 10 per cent, on all goods bought 
of them. In ordering please give L. A. S. 
number: 

Syracuse Arms Co., Syracuse, N. Y. Guns. 
Davenport Fire Arms Co., Norwich, Conn. Shot 

guns, rifles. 
Gundlach Optical Co., Rochester, N. Y. Photographic 

goods. 
Blair Camera Co., Rochester, N.Y .Photographic goods. 
James Acheson, Talbot St., St. Thomas, Ontario, 

Sporting goods. 

LIFE MEMBERS OF THE LEAGUE. 
W. D. Ellis, 136 W. 7 2d street, New York City. 
A. F. Rice, 155 Pennington avenue, Passaic, N. J. 
Dr. W. A. Valentine, 5 W. 35th street, New York 

City. 
A. A. Anderson, 6 E. 38th street, New York City. 
A. V. Fraser, 478 Greenwich street, New York 

City. 

E. S. Towne, care National Blank Book Co., Hol- 

yoke, Mass. 

F. G. Miller, 108 Clinton street, Defiance, Ohio. 
Gen. J. F. Pierson, 20 W. 52d street, New York 

City. 
E. T. Seton, 80 W. 40th street, New York City. 
J. H. Seymour, 35 Wall street. New York City. 
A. G. Nesbitt, Maple street, Kingston, Pa. 
D. C. Beard, 204 Amity street, Flushing, L. I. 

C. H. Ferry, 1720 Old Colony Bldg., Chicago, 111. 
Hon. Levi P. Morton, 681 5th avenue, New York 

City. 
H. Williams, P. O. Box 156, Butte, Mont 

D. B. Fearing, Newport, R. I. 

E. H. Dickinson, Moosehead Lake Me. 
Lorenzo Blackstone, Norwich, Cor.n. 

A. L. Prescott, 90 W. Broadway, New York City. 

G. S. Edgell, 192 Broadway, New York City. 
W. B. Mershon, Saginaw, Mich. 

Hon. H. W. Carey,. East Lake, Mich. 

George Carnegie, Fernandina, Fla. 

Andrew Carnegie, 2nd, Fernandina, Fla. 

Morris Carnegie, Fernandina, Fla. 

W. L. Underwood, 52 Fulton street, Boston, Mass. 

C. E. Butler, Jerome, Ariz. 

Mansfield Ferry, 183 Lincoln Park, Boulevard. 

Chicago, 111. 
Austin Corbin, 192 Broadway, New York City. 
J. Stanford Brown, 480 Fifth Ave., New York City. 
W. H. Smith, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 
E. B. Smith, Bourse Bldg., Philadelphia, Pa. 
A. J. McClure, 158 State street. Albany, N. Y. 
T. Walter Thompson, Times Bide . New York City. 
Clinton Gilbert, 2 Wall St., New York City. 
E. J. Hudson, 33 East 35th St., Bavonne, N J. 

There are thousands of men in the 
United States who should be life mem- 
bers. Why don't they join? Will some- 
one please take a club and waken them? 



FORESTRY. 



EDITED BY DR. B. E. FERNOW, 

Director of the New York School of Forestry, Cornell University, assisted by Dr. John C. Gifford of the same 

institution. 
It takes 30 years to grow a tree and 30 minutes to cut it down and destroy it. 



PRACTICAL FORESTRY. 

Forestry is a word that is becoming 
familiar to nearly every reader of news- 
papers or magazines, but probably few 
people stop to consider its real meaning. 
It is a subject claiming more and more 
the attention of scientists, sought and 
studied in our colleges, and ranking as a 
profession with that of the lawyer, physi- 
cian and other of the higher orders. 

There is nothing new in the forests them- 
selves, but the treatment of them is 
opening a new avenue of employment for 
■hundreds. Neither is it to be- a work 
wholly of a scientific nature. It bristles 
with practical requirements at every point. 

From Mother Earth to the mill, or to 
that handsome piece of parlor furniture or 
delicately tinted writing paper, bearing the 
water mark of "linen" but perhaps only a 
few brief days made from the forests, may 
be termed a branch of forestry. 

To forestry our land owners are giving 
an increasing interest, studying how best to 
grow, preserve and continue the vast for- 
ests of Maine. Only a few years ago the 
man who advanced the idea of forestry 
was the laughing stock of the old woods-' 
man, who allowed "there would be wood 
enough as long as man existed." Those 
were the days before the great vats and 
grinders of the ever increasing pulp mills 
had commenced to devour the forests to 
an extent that sent out a warning of 
alarm. 

Soil which is adapted to the growth of 
spruce may be as profitable to its owner or 
his heirs as that which is wholly suited or 
particularly chosen for its crop-bearing 
qualities. Rich indeed is the owner of 
soil suited to the growth of both crops 
and trees. Land that is non-agricultural, 
on account of being hilly or rocky, often is 
the best soil for the growth of spruce, and 
on it trees will grow to merchantable size 
in 40 to 50 years. By merchantable size is 
meant a tree having a diameter of 12 to 15 
inches breast high. The yield is estimated 
to be 1,000 to 20,000 feet an acre. 

A forest should be crowded when young 
to promote upward growth, as a tree that 
stands alone grows too much to branches 
and does not yield good timber. Much 
care should be taken in the cutting of our 
forests ; only that timber which is sizeable 
and merchantable should be removed. The 



smaller should be left to grow, thereby 
solving the problem of preserving the for- 
ests, but still handling them to a profit. 
Only the average growth should be re- 
moved from a tract each year. 

It has been ascertained that the average 
annual growth of the State forests of Sax- 
ony, which are nearly all non-agricultural 
land, is 225 feet an acre, board measure. 
There are 432,300 acres of such forest; 
therefore the total annual growth of the 
whole forest is 97,200,000 feet, which quan- 
tity of timber can annually be cut without 
impairing the forests. The forest proper- 
ly treated increases rather than diminishes 
in value. Saxony, which takes the lead in 
forestry, derives a net annual revenue of 
$4.50 an acre from her State forests. 
France, from 2,100,000 acres of productive 
forest, derives a net annual revenue of 
$1.91 an acre. Prussia, from 6,000,000 acres 
of State forests, has a net annual revenue 
of $1.50 an acre. The aggregate of the 
State forests of Germany is 10,000,000 
acres, from which is derived an annual net 
profit of $23,000,000. The forests of Ger- 
many support 3,000,000 people. 

Prof. Chas. S. Sargent, of the United 
States government, says in his report on 
the forest trees of North America: "The 
condition of the forests of Maine is inter- 
esting. They show that forest preserva- 
tion is perfectly practicable in the Atlantic 
region, at least when the importance of the 
forest to the community is permanent. 
The existence of the State depends on the 
maintenance of the forest. The great for- 
ests of pine can not be restored, but the 
preservation of the few remnants of these 
forests is not impossible. The forests of 
Maine, once considered practically ex- 
hausted, still yield largely and continuous- 
ly, and the public sentiment which has 
made possible their protection is the one 
hopeful symptom in the whole country 
that a change of feeling in regard to for- 
est property is gradually taking place. The 
experience of Maine shows that where 
climatic conditions are favorable to forest 
growth, the remnants of the original forest 
can be preserved and new forests created, 
as soon as the entire community finds for- 
est protection essential to its material pros- 
perity/' 

While practically a new work, consider- 
able progress is being made in forestry in 



60 



FORESTRY. 



61 



the United States. Legislative recogni- 
tion has been given forestry in 18 States, 
but the work has been abandoned in 3, 
leaving 15 in which the work is being car- 
ried on at present, as follows: Maine, 
Connecticut, Kansas, Maryland, Michigan, 
Minnesota, New Hampshire, New Jersey, 
New York, North Carolina, North Da- 
kota, Oregon, Pennsylvania, West Vir- 
ginia and Wisconsin. Over $250,000 is 
now annually appropriated by Congress for 
forestry purposes. A career for young 
American foresters is opening, and there 
are several schools where scientific educa- 
tion and practice in forestry can be 
acquired. Positions in the United States 
bureau of forestry opened to trained for- 
esters are those of field assistant. These 
positions carry a salary of $720 to $1,000 a 
year in the beginning, with the payment of 
all living and traveling expenses incident 
to field work. Field assistants generally 
spend about 6 months in the field and the 
remainder of the time in the preparation of 
the reports in Washington. Individual 
corporations and pulp concerns are taking 
a greater interest in forestry from year 
to year, realizing that in such work lies 
the success of their business. Such con- 
cerns as the International and Great North- 
ern are putting in much work along the 
line of forestry. 

A branch of forestry that is being given 
more attention than formerly is that of 
tree planting. Forest planting in Maine 
should be practically confined to the land 
that, by nature of its roughness or sterility, 
is unfit for agricultural purposes. Hilly 
and stony lands are usually fit only for the 
production of timber, and should be kept 
constantly forested. As long as lumber was 
cheap and plentiful, no progress could be 
made in such planting, but now that it is 
becoming- profitable to grow timber, the 
otherwise worthless land has begun to re- 
ceive attention. Many a worn out farm 
may be restored to fertility by growing 
forest trees on it for a series of years, 
and many Maine farms are better suited 
for the production of timber than for any 
other purpose. 

In his message to Congress, President 
Roosevelt said: "Public opinion through- 
out the United States has moved steadily 
for a just appreciation of the value of 
forests, whether planted or of natural 
growth. The great part played by them 
in the creation and maintenance of the na- 
tional wealth is now more fully realized 
than ever before. Wise forest protection 
does not mean the withdrawal of forest re- 
sources, whether of wood, water, or grass, 
from contributing their full share to the 
welfare of the people, but, on the contrary, 
gives the assurance of larger and more 
certain supplies. The fundamental idea of 



forestry is the perpetuation of forests by 
use. Forest production is not an end of it- 
self; it is a means to increase and sus- 
tain the resources of our country and the 
industries which depend on them. The 
preservation of our forests is an imperative 
business necessity. We have come to see 
clearly that whatever destroys the forest, 
except to make way for agriculture, threat- 
ens our well being." 

As an investment forestry is more and 
more playing a part in the commercial 
world. The capitalist of to-day is look- 
ing for a safe place in which to invest his 
income, and the purchase of timber lands 
is fast becoming one of the popular invest- 
ments which is considered safe and sure. 
Not many years ago lumber values were 
such that priyate persons making a busi- 
ness of lumbering could not afford to do 
the expensive logging necessary to pre- 
serve the forests. To cut only trees about 
12 or 15 inches in diameter involves a con- 
siderable added expense over cleaning the 
ground as they go, and to clean the ground 
of tops and other inflammable debris is 
still another expense which would put a 
business so conducted almost out of com- 
petition with that of the ordinary sort. 
Lumber is now high enough, however, so 
that if the lumbermen will be content with 
a nominally lighter annual profit they can 
make preservative lumbering pay and feel 
that, whatever the sacrifice, it will be more 
than compensated for by the increase in 
the value of the capital remaining in the 
timber. — Report of E. E. Ring, Forest Com- 
missioner of Maine. 



WOOD LOTS. 

In a recent paper entitled "The Use and 
Care of the Farm Wood Lot," Charles A. 
Davis, instructor in forestry at the Univer- 
sity of Michigan, called attention to the fol- 
lowing points : 

Every farm should have a well estab- 
lished wood lot, from, which firewood, 
posts, poles and other small timber used 
on a farm may be taken as needed. The 
wood lot may be on a hill too steep for 
cultivation, or any other place which may 
not be suitable for the ordinary purposes 
of agriculture ; and it may be so located 
as to form a windbreak. 

After a wood lot has been established it 
must be kept in good condition. Not in- 
frequently a farmer will so neglect his 
wood lot or so misuse it as to cause it to 
deteriorate rapidly. Such deterioration is 
often due to excessive thinning, to pas- 
turing or to constant removal of the better 
timber and the. leaving of the poorer trees. 
Correct use would exclude cattle and sheep 
entirely. The undergrowth should be left 
to form a soil cover, which adds to the 
moisture-receiving capacity; or young 



62 



RECREATION. 



trees should be planted which will grow 
in the shade and eventually replace the old 
growth. Maple, beech, box elder, ash and 
many other species are useful for this pur- 
pose. In removing trees only the poorest 
timber which can be used for the desired 
purpose should be taken. This is con- 
trary to the general practice in which tall, 
straight and vigorous timber is often cut 
down for firewood when the less thrifty, 
crooked or branchy trees would serve just 
as well. 

The wood lot should be fenced up to its 
border. If a margin of grass land is al- 
lowed between the border of the wood and 
the fence, the temptation to use the whole 
for pasturage may prove too great. 

If undesirable kinds of trees are present, 
more desirable kinds should be planted, 
and as soon as these have been established 
the others may be removed. It should, 
however, always be remembered that for 
firewood poor soft woods often yield in the 
aggregate a greater profit than the slower 
growing hard woods. Thus poplars and 
willows will pay much better in a given 
time than the more valuable hickories and 
hard maples. 

Some species of trees will produce 
marketable material, such as poles and 
posts, in 15 to 25 years, while timber of 
large dimensions will take 40 to 100 years 
to grow. 



METHODS OF FIGHTING FIRE. 

The best method of fighting fire depends 
on the location and conditions. The chief 
requirement is to fight, by some method, 
and to commence as soon as possible after 
a fire is discovered. Often a fire which 
could have been stopped with little exertion 
at first, results in heavy losses as it spreads 
almost beyond control. 

A favorite and usually successful method 
of fighting fires is by trenching around 
them. A trench 2 or 3 feet deep should be 
dug, care being taken to remove all the old 
roots and twigs to stop the progress of the 
fire in the ground. Then with plenty of 
help the fire can usually be checked by the 
time it has burned to the trenches. 

Where water is near, good service can 
be done by a bucket brigade. Surface fires 
can be checked, if not of too much volume, 
by beating them out with green branches. 
Dirt or sand thrown on fire is one of the 
best means of putting it out. Setting back 
fires is another way of stopping destruc- 
tive fires. The back fire must be allowed 
to burn only against the wind and toward 
the main fire, so that when the 2 fires 
meet they must both go out for lack of 
fuel. To prevent back fires from moving 
with the wind, they should be started on the 
windward side of a road, or clearing, or 
some Line which they can be kept from 



crossing. Back fires are sometimes driven 
beyond control by a change of wind, but 
the chief danger from their use is lighting 
them at the wrong time or in the wrong 
place. Still, there is no other means of 
fighting fire so powerful, and none so effec- 
tive when rightly used. Fire lines, strips 
kept free from inflammable material, are 
useful in checking small fires and of great 
value as lines of defense in fighting large 
ones. — Exchange. 



FOREST EXHAUSTION IN SIGHT. 

We may as well realize that our efforts to se- 
cure a more rational treatment of our forest re- 
sources and apply forestry in their management 
are not too early, but rather too late; that they 
are by no means sufficient; that serious trouble 
and inconvenience are in store for us in the not 
too distant future; that the blind indifference and 
the dallying or amateurish playing with the 
problem by Legislatures and officials is fatal. 

We can summarize the situation, which justi- 
fies the urgent need of the foresters' art in the 
United States, from the point of view of supplies, 
as follows: 

The consumption of forest supplies, larger than 
in any other country in the world, promises not 
only to increase with the natural increase of the 
population, but in excess of this increase per 
capita, similar to that of other civilized industrial 
nations, annually at a rate of not less than 3 to 
5 per cent. 

The most sanguine estimate of timber standing 
predicates an exhaustion of supplies in less than 
30 years if this rate of consumption continues, and 
of the most important coniferous supplies in a 
much shorter time. 

The conditions for continued imports from our 
neighbor, Canada, practically the only country 
having accessible supplies such as we need, are not 
reassuring, and may not be expected to lengthen 
the natural supplies appreciably. 

The reproduction of new supplies on the exist- 
ing forest area could under proper management 
be made to supply the legitimate requirements for a 
long time; but fires destroy the young growth 
over large areas, and where production is allowed 
to develop, in the mixed forest at least, owing 
to culling processes which remove the valuable 
kinds and leave the weed trees, these latter re- 
produce in preference. 

The attempts at systematic silviculture, that is, 
the growing of new crops, are, so far, infinitesi- 
mal, compared with the needs. 

B. E. Fernow, in the Forestry Quarterly. 



FOREST EXPERIMENT STATION. 
The Bureau of Forestry of the United States 
Department of Agriculture has established a per- 
manent forest experiment station at the University 
of California. Dr. W. K. Hatt, recently called 
from the chair of applied science in Purdue Uni- 
versity to serve as civil engineer in the Bureau 
of Forestry, has gone from Washington to organ- 
ize the station. The resources of the civil engi- 
neering laboratory of the university have been 
placed at his disposal. A civil engineer who will 
go from Washington to take charge of the work, 
and his student assistants, will be continuously 
engaged hereafter in commercial and scientific 
investigations as to California woods. San Fran- 
cisco lumber dealers have offered to supply all 
the timber needed. Laboratory investigations will 
be conducted as to the strength of various Cali- 
fornia timbers, the effects on timbers of wet and 
dry weather, of heat and cold, elasticity and dura- 
bility, preservative methods, ways of seasoning, 
arid the like. The results secured at this station 
will be made available for general use by publica- 
tion as bulletins of the Bureau of Forestry. — 
Forestry and Irrigation. 



PURE AND IMPURE FOODS. 



" What a Man Eats He Is." 

Edited by C. F. Langworthy, Ph.D. 

Author of " On Citraconic, Itaconic and Mesaconic Acids," " Fish as Food,'' etc. 



CHEESE IN SMALL SIZES. 

As chemical analysis and the experience 
of users show, cheese is one of the most 
wholesome and nutritions foods. Cheddar, 
full cream, Swiss and similar kinds of 
cheese contain on an average S3 per cent, 
water, 27 per cent protein, 34 per cent, fat, 
2 per cent, carbohydrates and 4 per cent, 
ash, the fuel value being about 2,000 calo- 
ries a pound. Such cheese as cottage and 
Neufchatel, which are made from sour 
milk, are eaten fresh and moist. They con- 
tain some 60 per cent, water. The protein 
content is not far from 20 per cent, and the 
carbohydrate and ash content are much the 
same as in the sorts mentioned. If made 
of skim milk, the fat content is low, aver- 
aging about one per cent. If the cream is 
included, the fat content is about the same 
as in other cheese. Depending on whether 
cream is or is not present, the fuel value 
ranges from 500 to 1,500 calories a pound. 

It will be seen that cheese, especially such 
sorts as Cheddar, full cream, etc., contains 
large percentages of protein and fat, to- 
gether with small quantities of carbohy- 
drates and ash. In other words, cheese 
supplies fairly large quantities of both ni- 
trogenous material and energy in propor- 
tion to its bulk. Notwithstanding its high 
food value, cheese is apparently eaten much 
less in this country than in some regions 
of Europe. According to statistics gath- 
ered by the Storrs Connecticut Agricul- 
tural Experiment Station, cheese furnishes 
only 0.4 per cent, of the total food, 1.6 per 
cent, of the total protein and 1.6 per cent, 
of the total fat in the average American 
diet. The cheese most commonly eaten is 
like the English cheddar, and is known by 
that name or as factory cheese. The thor- 
oughness with which this kind of cheese 
is digested by man was recently studied by 
H. Snyder at the Minnesota Station. He 
found that when a fairly large quantity was 
eaten with a ration of bread and milk, 93 
per cent, of the protein and 95 per cent, 
of the fat of the cheese were digested, the 
available energy being 93 per cent. Arti- 
ficial digestion experiments showed that the 
pancreas ferment had much more effect on 
cheese than the peptic, indicating that it 
is digested in the intestines rather than in 
the stomach. According to Professor Sny- 
der, "this is probably thfe reason why cheese 
is characterized as a hearty food, and fre- 
quently causes digestive troubles when 
eaten. In such cases the quantity of cheese 



63 



consumed should be reduced to correspond 
with the digestive capacity of the indi- 
vidual." 

In order to promote the manufacture of 
various kinds of cheese in this country, 
it is desirable to encourage greater con- 
sumption and thus increase the demand. 
Many believe that marketing cheese in 
more convenient and attractive forms 
would increase the consumption of this 
valuable food product. More attention is 
given to this matter in the case of butter 
than in the case of cheese. Some of the 
higher priced sorts are marketed in small 
packages and jars, but the bulk of the 
cheese consumed is still undoubtedly mar- 
keted in large sizes, which are cut into 
slices and sold by the pound. Such slices 
do not keep well, since the freshly cut sur- 
face exposed to the air is large in propor- 
tion to the weight. E. H. Farrington, of 
the Wisconsin Station, has reported the re- 
sults of experiments on the manufacture 
of cheese in small sizes, the form chosen 
being suggested by the pound prints of but- 
ter which have proved so successful. The 
cheddar cheese experimented with was 
made by the usual process, the only modi- 
fication being in the pressing. The curd 
was placed in a mold, or hoop, of rectan- 
gular shape, the bottom or "follower" of 
which was a carved board divided into a 
number of sections, each of which corre- 
sponded to a half-pound print of cheese. 
Two sections would, of course, represent a 
pound. The form of the prints is deter- 
mined by the carving of the board, which 
may be of any size or design to suit any 
particular market. The sections can be 
readily cut apart when sold by the retailer. 
In the experiments at the University of 
Wisconsin the letters U W were stamped 
on each section of cheese. The thickness 
of the block of cheese is, of course, regu- 
lated by the quantity of curd put into the 
mold each time. The Wisconsin blocks of 
cheese averaged nearly 15 pounds in weight 
and were each divided into 15 prints. The 
dimensions of each block of cheese were 
IT -5 by 13-25 by 2.5 inches, each print being 
2.5 by 4.25 inches. 

No difficulty was experienced in curing 
the cheeses in the same ways as are fol- 
lowed with cheddar. The bottom and sides 
should be greased and the cheese turned 
occasionally, although it should not rest 
on the printed surface a long time. By ex- 
ercising a little care in handling these 



6 4 



RECREATION. 



cheeses during the curing process, accord- 
ing to Professor Farrington, they can be 
kept clean and attractive in apppearance, 
and if well made from good milk will de- 
velop an acceptable flavor that, together 
with the trade-mark branded into each 
pound, will be helpful in protecting the 
reputation of any given make of cheese. 



FRENCH PATE DE FOIS GRAS. 

The statement has been made that in the 
high priced French pate de foie gras ex- 
ported to the United States "the traditional 
diseased livers have been replaced by beef 
and pork." Discussing these subjects, the 
American Consul at Bordeaux, Albion W. 
Tourgee, says : 

"It is hardly correct, at the outset, to 
refer to foie gras, as it is produced in 
Southern France, at least, as diseased. A 
fatted goose liver is no more diseased than 
the meat of an overfed hog. Both are ab- 
normal and in that sense might be regard- 
ed as the product of unsanitary conditions. 
The goose may for a time be confined by a 
tether a yard or so in length, fastened to a 
stake, beside which it waits with the health- 
iest appetite for its frequently supplied 
portion of American corn meal, which is 
the food chiefly relied on for fattening. In 
fact, the increased importation of American 
maize during the past quarter of a century 
has been a chief stimulus to the trade in 
foie gras. The goose is not encouraged to 
take too much exercise, any more than any 
other fattening animal. It is not fed for its 
health, but to incline it to take on fat. The 
result of this is to greatly enlarge the liver, 
which is the most valuable part of the car- 
cass. Those who have seen the prize hog, 
almost unable to stand erect, and kept from 
actual melting of its superabundant flesh 
only by frequent use of the hose, will read- 
ily perceive that if too much fat is a dis- 
ease there are other forms of abnormal de- 
velopment just as objectionable as the 
much prized goose liver. 

"Foie gras d'oie, the fat goose liver, is 
prepared for use and export here in sev- 
eral forms : Foie gras nature! ; pates de 
foie gras; and puree de foie gras. The 
foie gras naturel is simply the cooked liver 
served without any form of sauce or sea- 
soning except the fat or oil of the liver it- 
self. t The pate de foie gras of commerce 
consists of the cooked liver packed in tin 
boxes of a standard size, which the liver is 
roughly cut to fit. The space not occupied 
by the liver is filled with the trimmings of 
the liver or with pork, finely hashed and 
pressed in. Over this is poured the melt- 
ed fat, sometimes of the liver and some- 
times beef suet. The pieces of liver clipped 
off in this process of fitting the cooked liver 
to the box are used with other hashed 



meats and flavoring matters like truffles in 
preparing what is known in commerce as 
puree de foie gras. 

"The practice of using suet instead of 
the natural fat of the goose liver, as a sup- 
port or matrix by which the interstices 
between the liver and the box are filled, 
is not so wholly reprehensible as might at 
first appear, since it has certain good rea- 
sons, or at least excuses. In the first place, 
the suet and the somewhat firmer meat 
packed about the liver prevent the latter 
from being broken by sliding about in 
the box, as it is likely to do on long jour- 
neys when only the thin oil of the liver is 
used. Another fact which shippers have 
learned by costly experience is that the 
pure fat of the goose is much more likely 
than beef suet to become rancid when used 
as the sole pack of the foie. It is also 
claimed that the strong greenish fat of the 
goose is sometimes repulsive to persons of 
weak stomach; and that Americans, who 
are especially opposed to what they term 
'messy dishes,' are unreasonably opposed to 
pates made with the pure goose fat. The 
modifications described are prepared simply 
to reconcile the perverted American taste 
to the foreign dainty. Though the primal 
purpose of the change of material was no 
doubt to reduce the cost of production, the 
result is said not only to be a reduction 
m price to the consumer, but to give him 
an _ opportunity to select the form of this 
delicacy he may prefer. Some people great- 
ly prefer the sorts which have the foie nat- 
urel with the supporting pate made of oth- 
er hashed meats and the more wholesome 
appearing and less highly flavored suet. 

"Instead of being a harmful or depreci- 
able adulteration of a well known product, 
it is claimed this is a modification not only 
harmless, but of a character essential to its 
preservation and adaptation to the popular 
taste of the majority of the American peo- 
ple. At all events, it does not seem exact- 
ly fair that firms which have made entirely 
healthful products should be rated by name 
among those engaged in making and selling 
adulterated food. At least one well known 
shipper manufactures all kinds of foie gras 
known to commerce, leaving to his custom- 
ers the choice of those best suited to their 
particular trade. All are good and all their 
components absolutely wholesome, as he 
declares, some being better adapted for 
one taste and some for others.." 



I can not eat them," said the belle, 
looking nervously at the dainty entree of 
frogs' legs. 

"Why not? They're all right." 
"Oh, they look like breaded chorus 
girls." 



BOOK NOTICES. 



THE CARIBOU. 

The 7th Annual Report of the New York 
Zoological Society contains an interesting 
and important paper by Mr. Madison Grant, 
Secretary of the Society, on the caribou 
species of North America. 

In view of the recent discoveries in North- 
western North America, and elsewhere, of 
a new species of caribou, Mr. Grant's paper 
is timely and valuable. Without entering 
on technical descriptions of the characters 
of the various species that have been de- 
scribed up to date, the author sets forth 
clearly and distinctly the 2 great groups of 
caribou, the barren ground and the wood- 
land ; and by means of an admirable map 
illustrates the areas occupied by each and 
the type locality of each species thus far 
described. Eastward of the dividing line be- 
tween Alberta and Assiniboia, the woodland 
caribou does not range North of the 59th 
parallel. Westward of that region, how- 
ever, the mountain caribou, Osborn's cari- 
bou, and possibly others, range from North- 
ern Idaho Northwestward, nearly to the 
Copper river, Alaska. On the Kenai pen- 
insula occurs Stone's caribou, and on the 
Alaska peninsula, Grant's caribou, both of 
which belong to the barren ground group. 
The latest accession to the ranks of caribou 
species is Peary's caribou, from Ellsmere 
Land. 

The number of species accredited to the 
barren ground group are 5, and to the 
woodland 4; but the author does not vouch 
for the permanency of all these forms. 

The illustrations contained in this paper 
constitute a feature of great interest. The 
10 plates of full length figures show some 
exceptionally choice subjects; while the 20 
plates which illustrate the antlers of 8 spe- 
cies constitute a collection which every nat- 
uralist and sportsman will value. 

In dealing with the caribou of North 
America, as a whole, Mr. Grant handles his 
subject with commendable judgment and 
breadth of view. He is careful to avoid 
conclusions that are not based on grounds 
absolutely unassailable, but wisely leaves 
to the future the determination of certain 
vexed questions which can not be settled 
until much mOre material has been secured 
and made available. 

It is difficult to say too much in praise 
of such papers as this, popular in form, but 
scientifically exact, and replete with just 
such information as every lover of wild ani- 
mal life will appreciate and value. 

Copies of "The Caribou," bound as a 
separate pamphlet, can be obtained of the 
New York Zoological Society, No. 11 Wall 



street, New York city, at 40 cents each. 
None are available for gratuitous distribu- 
tion. 



LKARN THE PLANTS. 

"Our Northern Shrubs" is the title of a 
book written by Harriet L. Keeler, and pub- 
lished by Charles Scribner's Sons, New 
York. It is planned on the same lines as 
"Native Trees," which is also the work of 
Miss Keeler. The purpose of the present 
volume is to supply a complete guide to the 
shrubs of the Northern States, by the aid 
of which any one of them may be identified, 
and its habits learned. Nearly all the 
shrubs which grow in this region are il- 
lustrated in this book, either from photo- 
graphs or from careful and accurate pen- 
drawings. The photographic reproductions 
are especially clear, and the reader may 
identify many a shrub by a simple glance 
at one of these pictures without looking 
at the caption. Most of the subjects are 
shown in bloom, and some of them in the 
seed or fruit stage as well. The descrip- 
tions are of popular nature, so they may be 
readily understood by the amateur nature 
lover as well as by the trained botanist. 

Every man, woman and child who fre- 
quents the woods or the fields should have 
a copy of this book. It sells at $2 net and 
may be had through any book dealer. 



Among the most delightful of the sum- 
mer novelettes is "The Fighting Chance," 
by Gertrude Lynch. This story first ap- 
peared in The Smart Set, a year ago, and 
the publishers have thought it worthy of 
reproduction in book form. It is the story 
of a beautiful and unscrupulous girl who 
is intent on marriage and has 3 days 
in which to attain it. Miss Lynch's style 
is witty and epigrammatic, and the story 
flows lightly and gracefully to its conclu- 
sion, leaving the reader indisposed to quar- 
rel with the outcome. Miss Lynch's in- 
terest is chiefly psychological and her 
point of view satirical. Her men and wo- 
men flit easily through the realms of young 
love, holy matrimony and divorce, without 
unseemly evidence of emotion, and make 
charmingly attractive summer companions 
in a far too vigorous world. "The Fighting 
Chance" is published by the Smart Set 
Publishing Co., New York and London. 



$s 



"Florida Fancies," by F. R. Swift, is a 
most attractive and charmingly illustrated 
account of a 6 months' cruise through 
Florida waters in a naphtha launch. Mr. 
Swift is a thorough sportsman and has a 



65 



RECREATION. 



keen sense of humor. From New Yor2, 
up the wild, weird windings of the Ockla- 
wah river and out into Gum swamp, there 
is not a dull page in the book. Shooting 
ducks, geese, snipe, and quails ; hunting 
deer ; fishing ; and spearing alligaitors make 
lively work, of which Mr. Swift writes de- 
lightfully. 

"Jack Stanley, a Romance of the Cuban 
War," is a second story in the book ; a 
tragic love story which will strike a sympa- 
thetic chord in many a heart. 

"Florida Fancies" is published by G. P. 
Putnam's Sons, New York and London. 



H. W. Kerr, of Little Sioux, la., has 
written a book entitled "Quailology," 
which deals exhaustively with the question 
of domesticating and propagating the quail. 
It treats not only of Bob White, but of the 
entire quail family as represented in Amer- 
ica, and with at least 2 European species. 
The pamphlet is handsomely illustrated 
with photgraphs, several of them from live 
birds, and others from mounted speci- 
mens. Some of these photographs are 
printed in tinted inks and all on heavy 
coated paper, so that the best possible re- 
sults are secured. 

The book sells at $1 a copy and can be 
had by addressing the author as above. 



"People of the Whirlpool" is a story 
concerning phases of social life in 
Manhattan as seen by the eyes of a pro- 
vincial and contrasted with the sweetly 
domestic country life which the writer 
represents as her own. The name of the 
author is withheld, which is an inexpen- 
sive way of advertising a former book by 
the same. The present volume exploits 
the humble virtues, now so fashionable, of 
which, ^owever, the provincial family seem 
to have a somewhat fatiguing monopoly. 

Published by the Macmillan Company, 
New York and London; price $1.50. 



"The Witchery of Sleep," compiled by 
Mr. Willard Moyer, is a new and de- 
lightful book on the subject of sleep and 
its relation to human life, together with its 
moods, its mysteries, its sentiment, and all 
its accessories thereto. It is in royal oc- 
tavo, 225 pages, profusely illustrated with 
line engravings and 40 inserts in 2 colors, 
antique deckle edges, gilt tops, old' English 
style, bound in art cloth and stamped in 
gold and color. The price is $2, and the 
book is for sale by all booksellers, or sent 
postpaid on receipt of price by the publish- 
ers, Ostermoor & Company, 114 Elizabeth 
street, New York. 



Hon. W. F. Scott, Fish and Gamr, 
Warden of Montana, has printed the game 
laws of that State in a neat little pamphlet 



of convenient size for carrying in one's 
pocket. It would be well for every sports- 
man in that State, or who intends to hunt 
in that State at any time, to have a copy 
of these laws for reference, and same can 
be had, free of charge, by writing Mr. 
Scott at Helena. 



"Man Overboard" is a short story by 
Marion Crawford, which deals wit.li the 
supernatural. In his usual virile and effec- 
tive way Mr. Crawford mingles the salt 
breezes of the sea with chill, hair-lifting 
draughts that come no one may say whence. 
The story is not important but will make 
good summer reading. Published by The 
Macmillan Co., New York and London ; 
price 50 cents. 



"Methods of Estimating and Measuring 
Standing Timber," by A. Knechtel, B.S., 
F.E., has been issued in pamphlet form as 
a reprint from the 6th Annual Report of 
the Forest, Fish and Game Commission of 
the State of New York. This is the best 
if not the only publication devoted entirely 
to this subject which has yet appeared in 
the English language. 



Why do you not publish Recreation 
twice a month, and put the price up to $2? 
It's a long time to keep a man waiting, a 
whole month. When I get mine, they can 
not get me to my meals until I have looked 
it over. There and then I fill my old pipe 
and get my easy chair by the fire, and am 
lost to the world until I have given it a 
good overhauling. 

A. F. Chase, Dorchester, Mass. 



"Do you call yourself a poet or a versi- 
fier?" 

"Well, when the editor uses one of my 
effusions to light his pipe with I suppose 
it's a case of verse afire." — Philadelphia 
Record. 



I have been a reader and admirer of your 
magazine for some time. Am particularly 
pleased with the articles in regard to the 
porkers who do not know how to stop 
when they have enough. 

H. H. Humphrey, Sisseton, S. D. 



There was once in Kentucky a colonel 
Who a jug kept for jagging noctolonel. 
When one night his fair daughter 
Plugged the jug chuck with waughter, 
He kicked up a row most infolonel. 



Recreation is the best publication of 
its kind I ever saw. 

Chas. A. Lindstedt, Des Moines, la. 



PUBLISHER'S NOTES. 



YOUR VACATION IN COLORADO. 

Colorado is an ideal place to spend a 
summer vacation. It has been brought 
nearer the East by the fast train service of 
the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Rail- 
road, only one night on the road from 
Chicago or St. Louis to Denver. 

The fare during the summer is only 
about one-half the regular fare, and on cer- 
tain days less than half. 

Colorado has hundreds of moderate 
priced hotels and boarding houses, more 
perhaps than any other summer resort 
country. The prices range from $8 a week 
upward. 

Nowhere can such a glorious combina- 
tion of climate and scenery be found as in 
Colorado. The air invigorates, strengthens, 
revives; it is Nature's own tonic. All the 
outdoor sports that can be enjoyed any- 
where are possible in Colorado. There are 
many golf courses and 'the finest kind of 
trout fishing. 

Consider these facts carefully and write 
me for a copy of the Burlington's "Hand- 
book of Colorado." It does not attempt a 
description of Colorado's charms, but it 
does tell facts about 200 or more hotels and 
boarding houses ; shows the location, how 
reached, name and address of proprietor, 
rates by the week and month, principal at- 
tractions, etc. No charge for a copy. Will 
be glad to send copies to your friends. 

P. S. Eustis, 
209 Adams Street, Chicago, 111. 



Its tone is rich and mellow, and well suited 
for orchestral work, as well as instrumental. 

Al. Givers, 
Leader Endicott Hotel Orchestra. 



HAVE WINGS AND FLY HIGH. 

New York. 
Messrs. Wing & Son: 

For the past 5 years I have been using 
one of your pianos in the Kingston hotel, 
and am so satisfied with the instrument that 
I feel obliged to write you on the subject. 
To anyone in need of a first class piano my 
advice is to buy a Wing. 

G. C. Howe, proprietor. 

New York. 
Messrs, Wing & Son: 

It is with pleasure that I testify to the 
great merits of your celebrated piano. The 
instrumental attachments are perfect, and 
the tone is mellow and lasting. Your piano 
can stand on its own merits and needs no 
recommendation. 

Geo. W. Sweeney, 
Proprietor Victoria Hotel. 

New York. 
Messrs. Wing & Son: 
Dear Sirs : 
I cheerfully recommend the Wing piano. 



TWO TO FIFTEEN DAYS' PLEASURE TOURS. 

To meet the demand for information 
concerning tours to the Adirondack Moun- 
tains, Thousand Islands, Niagara Falls, the 
St. Lawrence River, the Saguenay, Lake 
Champlain, Lake George, the Green Moun- 
tains, etc., that can be made in 2 to 15 
clays, the New York Central has reissued 
"Four Track Series" No. 8, entitled "Two 
to Fifteen Days' Pleasure Tours." 

This publication is a booklet of 80 pages, 
and gives itineraries and fares to all of the 
above resorts, and, in addition, just the 
information necessary to the tourist in ar 
ranging a trip. 

Contained in the booklet are 2,7 maps of 
the various routes that enable the prospec- 
tive traveler to know before starting on 
his journey just what territory he will 
cover. 

The book is embellished with attractive 
half tone engravings, and should be in the 
hands of every one contemplating a sum- 
mer trip. It will be sent free, postpaid, 
on receipt of a 2 cent stamp, by George H.' 
Daniels, General Passenger Agent, Grand 
Central Station, New York. 



The latest patent and improved canvas 
folding boat on the market is that made 
by The Life Saving Folding Canvas Boat 
Co., of Kalamazoo, Mich. This boat has a 
steel frame, is puncture proof, has no bolts 
to remove, and it folds the most compactly 
of any boat made. Here is what 2 buyers 
say of it : 

Dear Sirs: 

We are much pleased with the new idea 
of your patent boat lining and keel. It 
does away with the objectionable feature 
of the old style boat, that ugly looking keel 
rising 4 inches or more in the middle of 
the boat. Your flat keel is the crowning 
feature of the best all around boat ever 
built. Respectfully yours, 

Horace & Roberts, 

Nashville, Tenn. 

An illustrated circular, giving prices and 
descriptions and showing cuts of the dif- 
ferent models, will be mailed free on ap- 
plication to the makers. See their ad on 
page liv of this issue. Please mention 
Recreation. 



67 



68 



RECREATION. 



The Graphol Chemical Company, of 90 
William street, New York city, have lately 
brought into the market preparations of 
surprising simplicity for sensitizing various 
materials. Their Graphol blue produces 
beautiful pictures on stationery, envelopes, 
linen, silk, white canvas, glass transparen- 
cies, etc. Their Graphol brown can be ap- 
plied to the same materials, also to wood, 
making pictures on wood similar to burnt- 
wood effects. The method of printing is so 
simple that every amateur will wish to have 
these preparations in his outfit. 

The Graphol blue, as well as the Graphol 
brown, comes in powder form, and any part 
of these powders, when diluted in water, 
in proportions stated in the directions, can 
be used. These powders, if protected from 
light, keep their photographic qualities, and 
there is no waste connected with them. 
Read the ad of these goods in this issue, 
and write the manufacturers for further in- 
formation. Please do not fail to mention 
Recreation. 



In writing for the book please mention 
Recreation. 



"The Complete Campers' Manual" is 
more fascinating than a novel, and as full 
of information as a dictionary. The man- 
ual is written and published by Buzzacott, 
the famous authority on everything per- 
taining to camp life. In it he tells how 
to outfit for every possible emergency of 
camp life, and how to improvize conve- 
niences and comforts from materials at 
hand, if lacking a regular equipment. He 
also tells what not to do, which is often 
most important. The marvelously ingeni- 
ous devices he describes are illustrated, 
and the book is a lure to win the most in- 
different to have a try at camp life, while 
the experienced camper can find new ideas 
in the Manual that will be worth many 
dollars to him. A copy of this invaluable 
book will be sent free to each reader of 
Recreation who will write Buzzacott, Ra- 
cine, Wis., and mention Recreation. 



-Yawman & Erbe, Rochester, N. Y., have 
issued a new catalogue of their fishing 
reels which contains a lot of excellent illus- 
trations of the automatic reel and oi the 
methods of using it. By examining this 
pamphlet you will .learn exactly how it is 
that the little finger does it, leaving your 
left hand free for hanging on trees, the 
bank, or for handling your pipe or what- 
ever else you may have use for it to do. 
The book is as full of information as a 
hickory nut is of meat, and every angler 
should have a copy. 

Yawman & Erbe are in the field again 
with an offer of 5 cash prizes for the largest 
fishes taken with their reels during the 
present season. Two of these prizes, $15 
each, are offered to boys and girls under 
16 years of age. 



"Hints to Tourists" is the name of a 
new and most attractive booklet issued by 
the Chicago & Northwestern Railway Com- 
pany, to answer the vacation questions, 
Where Shall I Go? How Get There.' 1 
What Will It Cost? The booklet gives in- 
formation in regard to shooting, fishing 
and camping resorts in the beautiful lake 
and forest regions of Minnesota, Wiscon- 
sin, Michigan, Montana, Illinois, Iowa and 
the Dakotas. This information includes a 
map of the C. & N. W. Ry., rates of trans- 
portation, connections, lists of hotels and 
boarding houses, kinds of game and fish to 
be found at each resort, and practically all 
the data a tourist can need to aid him in 
planning his vacation. Besides, it is beau- 
tifully illustrated. 

Write for a copy of "Hints to Tourists," 
and please say you saw it mentioned in 
Recreation. 



The Old Hickory Chair Co., of Martins- 
ville, Ind., is making a sectional metal boat 
that bids fair to become popular among 
sportsmen as soon as a few of the boats are 
distributed. This company has established 
an enviable reputation for good work 
through the medium of the old hickory fur- 
niture of which they have sold great quan- 
tities during the past few years. W T e are 
using a lot of their rocking chairs, dining 
chairs, etc., at the Mashipacong Club, and 
I have never seen better work or better ma- 
terial employed in any such work than in 
this furniture. It is fair to assume that the 
boats will be made with the same care and 
in the same thorough manner as the furni- 
ture, and sportsmen may therefore feel per- 
fectly safe in ordering these sectional boats. 
Write for descriptive circular and mention 
Recreation. 

To keep 7 playhouses open all summer, 
and all under one management, is a task 
few theatrical impresarios attempt in these 
days. F. F. Proctor is a notable exam- 
ple of the type of manager who bei:eves in 
doing things that the majority of his con- 
freres fight shy of. Mr. Proctor, announ- 
ces, for instance, that not one of his 7 play- 
houses will close its doors this summer, 
and his staff are already hard at work 
making the necessary preparations for a 
hot weather campaign. These preparations 
include laying in a stock of 20,000 big palm 
leaf fans ; covering the plush chairs with 
cool, smooth linen covers ; overhauling the 
ventilating system of each house; replacing 
the winter draperies with light and airy 
stuffs, and a score of other details like 
these. 



PUBLISHER'S NOTES. 



69 



The passenger traffic department of the 
Canadian Pacific railway has issued its 
year book, entiJed "Fishing and Shooting 
on the Line of the C. P. R." The present 
volume is fully up to the standard of its 
predecessors in the great fund of valuable 
detailed information it gives as to where to 
find the various species of game and fish in 
the Canadian Pacific country. The book is 
handsomely illustrated, contains synopses 
of the game laws of all the Canadian Prov- 
inces, maps, names of local agents of the 
C. P. R., and much other matter of vital 
interest to sportsmen who intend to visit 
that country. Write Robert Kerr, Traffic 
Manager of the C. P. R., Montreal, and 
mention Recreation. 



The frequent need of a good portable 
boat is apparent to every sportsman. This 
need is fully met by the King folding can- 
vas boat. It is strong, serviceable, equal 
in every respect to a well built wooden 
pleasure boat, but it can be easily and 
quickly folded and as easily set up again. 
It is perfectly safe for women and chil- 
dren as well as for men, and it does not 
require an outlay every year to make it 
ready for use. 

The manufacturers issue a handsome cat- 
alogue illustrating the many models of 
these folding boats and giving full informa- 
tion about them. Write for a copy of the 
catalogue and please mention Recreation. 



The Century Camera Company, of 
Rochester, New York, is putting on the 
market a new Curtain Slide Shutter which 
is attracting much attention among photo- 
graphers. It is especially adapted for tak- 
ing subjects in motion or requiring, for any 
reason, particularly short exposures. It 
should prove invaluable to amateurs who 
wish to secure choice photographs of birds 
and animals. The many readers of Rec- 
reation who are interested in such work 
should write for descriptive circular and 
speed table. In doing so please say you 
saw the shutter mentioned in Recreation. 



Louisville, Ky. 
The Luther Glove Co., 

Berlin, Wis. 
Dear Sirs : 

The gloves reached me safe, and fit me 
perfectly. They are most excellent, and 
I thank you for them; also Recreation's 
generous editor, Mr. G. O. Shields, for 
making it possible for me to earn them. 
I shall not fail to tell my friends how I 
got and who makes the gloves. 

Yours respectfully, 

Dr. E. D. Jackson. 



way, New Voik, has put on the market a 
neat and handy device for filling foun- 
tain pens which is sure to prove popular. 
It does away with all the annoyance to 
which users of these pens have been sub- 
jected in the past, and makes the task a 
brief, simple and pleasant one. Read the 
ad of the company in this issue of Recrea- 
tion and send for one of the instruments. 
Please mention Recreation. 



Maher & Grosh Co., 

Toledo, Ohio. 
Dear Sirs : I have used many kinds of 
German, English and American razors, but 
your No. 3 Barbers' razor puts them all in 
the shade. Shaving with most razors is 
more^pr less of a discomfort, but with the 
No. 3 it is a luxury. Please send me an- 
other razor like it, for which I enclose 
$1.25. 

J. Bebb, Santa Barbara, Calif. 



Every angler who values time or comfort 
should write J. M. Kenyon & Co. for a 
copy of their little book describing the Fisk 
aerating minnow pail. This clever con- 
trivance is bound to save a lot of hard 
work, a great deal of waste and much bad 
language. The book tells you all about it. 
In writing please mention Recreation. 



Messrs. Spratts Patent furnished the out- 
fit for the Ladies' Kennel Association's 
Show at Hempstead, L. I. This was the 
first open air show of the season. The en- 
tries were numerous. The benching, feed- 
ing and fitting up of the exhibition were 
entirely under the charge of Messrs. Spratts 
Patent. 



The Ideal Mfg. Co., of New Haven, 
Conn., has made up and put on the market 
another new bullet, number 429239. A cir- 
cular, giving full information regarding it, 
may be had by addressing the company, as 
above. 



Recreation is one of the best magazines 
I have ever read. 

Harry E. Maybee, Laclede, Mo. 



Recreation is the best paper out for 
sportsmen. 

Kenneth Townshend, Amherst, N. S. 



Recreation is exceedingly popular here. 
Rev. G. D. Bayne, Pembroke, Ont. 



Recreation can not be outdone. 

C. F. Shattuck, Worthington, Minn. 



The Beekman Novelty Co., 317 Broad- 



I dearly love Recreation. 
C. B. Paul, M.D., Des Moines, Iowa. 



EDITOR'S CORNER. 



HANSON IS ON THE WARPATH. 
Mr. G. O. Shields, New York, 

Dear Sir — Mr. Hanson, of Worcester, 
has placed in my hands a claim against 
you for damage done him by an article ap- 
pearing in your magazine, April, 1903, 
issue. I have found that this article was 
inspired by malice and with a purpose to 
injure Mr. Hanson. Unless this matter is 
adjusted forthwith I am instructed by Mr. 
Hanson to bring suit in the premises. 

Chas. O. Engstrom. 

Mr. C. O. Engstrom, Boston, Mass., 

Dear Sir — If you have learned that my 
criticism of S. E. Hanson was inspired by 
malice, you know more about me than I 
know about myself. I never saw the man 
and never heard of him until this matter 
came up, and you will certainly claim in 
court, if the matter should go so far, that 
he has done nothing in this connection to 
excite my anger. 

For 8 years past I have been criticising 
and rebuking men who slaughter game and 
fish, and I can show you hundreds of arti- 
cles in Recreation equally as severe as the 
one relating to Mr. Hanson. I have been 
actuated in all these cases simply by my 
deep interest in the subject of game and 
fish protection. I consider that in taking so 
large a number of fish at one time and 
place, and in the manner described, and 
then in publishing this exploit as credit- 
able, Hanson showed an utter lack of the 
true spirit of sportsmanship and made him- 
self what is known throughout the entire 
country to-day as a fish hog. Such slaugh- 
ter, if indulged in by fishermen generally 
and countenanced by the public, would soon 
result in the destruction of the entire fish 
supply of this country, and thus work an 
irreparable damage to the community. As 
the president of the League of American 
Sportsmen, and as the editor of a magazine 
devoted to shooting, fishing and nature 
study, I deem it not only my right, but my 
duty to characterize such conduct as that 
of Hanson in a way to arouse public sen- 
timent against it, and I insist that my 
criticism of Mr. Hanson was made without 
malice and entirely within legitimate 
bounds. It is not, therefore, subject to the 
action you propose bringing. 

It may interest you to know that my 
efforts in this direction have proven gener- 
ally successful. I have on file thousands 
of letters from men who say frankly that 
they have been game or fish hogs all their 
lives and never stopped to think of the 
harm they were doing until I inaugurated 
this warfare against such work, and that 



they have now reformed; that they quit 
when they get enough and advise then- 
friends to do likewise. If after consider- 
ing this matter from my point of view, 
you still persist in bringing an action 
against me, I can not, of course, prevent 
vou from doing so. 

G. O. Shields. 



THE ODELL GOLD STORAGE LAW. 

Governor Odell has already had several 
opportunities to see how gloriously his cold 
storage game law is working. The Arctic 
Freezing Co., against which an action has 
been pending some 2 years for having had 
over 50,000 birds in possession, in violation 
of law, has again been investigated by a 
State game warden, who found in the pos- 
session of this company more than 10,000 
ducks, snipe and plover that had been 
placed in cold storage without bonding and 
sealing as provided by law. 

The manager of a cold storage plant in 
Jersey City came to me a few days ago 
and asked me if he would be allowed to 
keep game in cold storage in that State in 
close season. I told him he would cer- 
tainly be subject to arrest and punishment 
if any game were found in his place after 
the close of the legal selling season. He 
explained that a New York game dealer 
had asked him to accept several barrels of 
ducks which he had in possession at that 
time," explaining that he did not care to 
store them on this side of the Hudson be- 
cause of the law which required that game 
held in storage here in close season should 
be bonded and sealed. Every man who 
has had anything to do with the enforce- 
ment of the game laws in this city knew 
when the Odell cold storage bill was passed 
that it would be violated, and this is being 
done. It would be interesting to see a list 
from the State game and fish commission 
of the names and addresses of dealers who 
have complied with the bonding law by 
placing game in cold storage under bond. 
Will not the governor have such a state- 
ment published? 



I find by consulting the files of Recrea- 
tion that, up to and including the June 
issue, 876 men and women have been re- 
buked for slaughtering game, song birds 
or fish. I deeply regret the necessity of 
saying "and women," but must tell the 
truth. 

Therefore, beginning with this, the July 
issue, each man and each woman who may 
come into the pen in future will be given a 
serial number. 



70 



RECREATION. 



7i 




We Go 

to Bohemia 
for Hops 



We send our own buyers 
there every year to get the best 
that are grown, and we pay for 
them twice what common hops 
cost. 

A partner in our business buys 
our barley, and selects the best 
from all. 

We get our water from six 
wells, bored to rock. 

Our yeast is all developed 
from the original mother cells 
which helped make Schlitz Beer 
famous. 



We even 

filter air 

All the air that touches Schlitz 
Beer comes to it through air filters. 

And the beer itself is filtered 
through white wood pulp, 

Then we age it for months, 
until it cannot cause biliousness. 

We sterilize every bottle, 

Yet Schlitz Beer 

costs only 

common beer 

prices 

Ask for the brewery bottling,. 



n 



RECREATION. 



THEY STILL REMIND PETERS. 
Binghamton, N. Y. 
The Peters Cartridge Co., 

Cincinnati, Ohio: 

Dear Sirs: — I have been reading your 
troubles in Recreation and fail to see that 
Mr. Shields has done anything injurious to 
you. It looks to me as if you were in 
your own light, and going wrong. I have 
used your ammunition for years and find it 
good but had trouble with shells in the 
Winchester repeater, the same as men- 
tioned in the article to which you object, 
though I never took the trouble to tell 
of them through the press. I think it a 
personal affair between you and every 
sportsman. I believe the sportsmen will 
stand by the editor of Recreation, and that 
the sale of your goods will decrease if you 
do not advertise in that magazine. I spend 
one to 4 months in the game fields as guide 
and game protector, always dictating the 
kind of ammunition to be used, besides 
using large quantities myself. 

Last fall, while in the Adirondack moun- 
tains with a party of 4, I had trouble with 
some U. M. C. shells, and wrote the firm 
about it. They at once remedied the 
trouble and sent me, express prepaid, some 
of the improved make. Perhaps it would 
have been well for the man who had trouble 
with your goods to have written you per- 
sonally instead of doing as he did ; but I 
hope and trust you will reconsider, drop 
your ill feeling towards the editor of Rec- 
reation, and continue doing 'business in a 
businesslike manner. 

R. R. Mathewson. 



San Antonio, Texas. 
The Peters Cartridge Co., 

Cincinnati, Ohio: 

Dear Sirs: — In Recreation for May, I 
note an article wherein you claim you have 
a grievance. I do not think you have, and 
think you have acted unwisely in ordering 
your ad discontinued. If Mr. Radcliff's 
letter had been false, it would have done 
you good rather than harm. It would have 
drawn as much comment, favorable to your 
goods, from Shields' 75,000 subscribers, as 
he could have printed. This would have 
given your firm thousands of dollars' worth 
of free advertising. I would have contempt 
for a 6-year-old boy who would get red 
headed about a thing like that. Just look 
at the note in a recent issue from a man in 
Edmonton, N. W. T. See how he condemns 
the Winchester rifle, which is the best 
made. Did the Winchester people get mad 
and order their ad stopped? No, they are 
too old for such foolishness. 

I have used your ammunition and found 
it O. K. The W. R. A. and the U, M. C. 
companies, however, make just as good and 
have done so for a long time. 

Recreation is the official organ of our 
League, and is published by one of us. 
The editor, Shields, goes down in his jeans 
for many a dollar to protect our game and 



deserves great credit for his good work. 
If your ad is permanently discontinued in 
Recreation I have shot my last Peters' 
cartridge. 

L. A. S., 2235. 



Schenectady, N. Y. 
The Peters Cartridge Co., 

Cincinnati, Ohio : 
Dear Sirs : — I see by a letter in May 
Recreation that you have withdrawn your 
ad from the magazine because Mr. 
Shields allows a reader to express his 
opinion of your shells. I am more 
than surprised that a firm that makes 
a good shell should play the baby act. 
Recreation is the official organ of the L. 
A. S. and as such must be open to its mem- 
bers. When I see anything to criticise, 
even though it is advertised in Recreation, 
I want and expect its pages will be open 
to me. When it refuses me that right, I 
shall refuse to take it. I lost $16 through 
an ad in a paper where the editor was 
constituted judge by the advertisers; but 
we don't put Shields up for that position,. 
We reserve the right to judge for ourselves. 

J. W. Furnside. 



Mount Morris, N. Y. 
The Peters Cartridge Co., 

Cincinnati. Ohio: 
Dear Sirs : — In the May number of Rec- 
reation there appears a copy of a letter 
written by you to Mr. G. O. Shields, editor 
and manager of that magazine. This letter 
puts forth a vigorous kick about some 
slight criticism which was made against 
your shells. If any irregularity exists in 
your shells you have taken a queer stand 
toward rectifying it, as you actually con- 
cede the superiority of other brands. The 
action you have taken toward a magazine 
which has upheld you so nobly in the past 
is childish and it is reasonable to believe 
that all the true sportsmen will uphold 
Mr. Shields in this matter. 

K. S. Chamberlain. 



We are all down on Peters' shells here. 
Our dealer says he can not sell goods of 
theirs that he bought 5 years ago. I have 
the highest possible regard for Recreation, 
as I am receiving more information from its 
pages than from all the other magazines I 
take. 

F. G. Ellis, Lime Grove, la. 



I think it far better that Peters' goods are 
not advertised in Recreation. I bought 
some Peters' Ideal shells in 1900. I tried 
15 July 4th, 1902, and none of them would 
go. The primers were driven in 3-16 of 
an inch. All the rest is trash. 

Chas. Vitous, East Pittsburg, Pa. 



RECREATION. 



73 



^.pX^y^'-'^h^*'-'' A ' '■%^£*'k r ' i :~.*'-i? ,-.."* {■"'■■:■- °. '■""'■■:■: ' '. '*■■■■ .-■'." ■,■>■-■:'■''-/,• ''-'- !'" , '" = / r '"' 





;/">.>:«>/ v. ' ■■<r-! 










i 









tW.-T'*. 






swa 



HENRY B . HYDE 

FOUNDER 



^fSHfe 



J.WAIEXANDER 

FHESIDENT 






J.H.HYDE 

VICE PRESIDENT 



YOUR DECLARATION 
OF INDEPENDENCE 

^ is signed when you 

become the holder of an Endowment 
policy in the Equitable . 

It gives you freedom from worry 
about either your own future— or 
the future of your family. 

It provides for yourself— if you 
live, and for your family— if you die. 

Vacancies in every State for men of energy and character to act as representatives. 

Apply to CAGE E.TARBELL. 2S£ Vice President 



Send this coupon for particulars, or write 

The Equitable Life Assurance Society of the United States 

120 Broadway, New York. Dept. No. 16 

Please send me information regarding- an Endowment for $ 

issued at years of age. 

Name 

Address 



tS&£ 






m& 



UUf 



74 



RECREATION. 



AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHY. 

"For sport the lens is better than the gun." 
I wish to r make this department of the utmost 
use to amateurs. I shall, therefore, be glad to 
answer any questions and to print any items sent 
me by practical amateurs relating to their experi- 
ence in photography. 



8th ANNUAL COMPETITION. 

Recreation has conducted 7 amateur 
photographic competitions, all of which 
have been eminently successful. The 8th 
opened April 1st, 1903, and will close .No- 
vember 30th, 1903. 

Following is a list of prizes to be 

awarded : ? 

First prize: A Long Focus Korona Camera, 
S x 7, made'by the Gundlach Optical Co., Roch- 
ester, N. Y., "fitted with a Turner-Reich Anastig- 
mat Lens, and listed at $85. 

Second prize: A No. 3 Folding Pocket Kodak, 
.made- by the Eastman Kodak Co., Rochester, N. 
Y., fitted with a Bausch & Lomb Lens, Plastig- 
mat LJ.nicum Shutter, and listed "at $61.50. ■ 

Third prize: A Royal Anastigmat Lens, 4 x 5, 
made by the Rochester Lens Co., Rochester, N. 
Y.; listed at $36. 

Fourth prize A Waterproof Wall Tent, 12 x 16, 
made by' Abercrombie & Fitch, New York, and 
listed at $32. 

Fifth prize: An Al- Vista-Panoramic Camera, 
made by the Multiscope and Film Co., Burlington, 
Wis., and. listed at $30. 

Sixth prize: A No. 3 Focusing Weno Hawk- 
eye Camera, made by the Blair Camera Co., 
Rochester, N. Y., and listed at $27.50. 

Seventh prize: A high grade Fishing Reel, 
made by W. H. Talbot, Nevada, Mo., and listed 
at $20. 

Eighth, prize: A Tourist Hawkeye Camera, 
4 x 5, and made by the Blair Camera Co., Roches- 
ter, N. Y., and listed at $15. 

Ninth prize: A Bristol Steel Fishing Rod, made 
by the Horton Mfg. Co., Bristol, Conn., and 
listed at $8. f 

Tenth prize: A pair of High Grade Skates, 
made by Barney & Berry, Springfield, Mass., and 
listed at $6. 

The 10 next best pictures will each be awarded 
one dozen 8 x 10 Carbutt Plates, made by the 
Carbutt Dry Plate Co., Wayne Junction, Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 

The 10 next best pictures will each be awarded 
one dozen 5x7 Carbutt Plates. 

The 10 next best pictures will each be awarded 
one dozen 4x5 Carbutt Plates. 
- A special prize: A Gperz Binocular Field Glass, 
listed at $74.25, will be given for the best picture 
of a live wild animal. 

^ Subjects are limited to wild animals, 
birds, fishes, camp scenes, and to figures 
or groups of persons, or animals, repre- 
senting in a truthful manner shooting, fish- 
ing; amateur photography, bicycling, sail- 
ing or other form of outdoor or indoor 
sport or recreation. Awards to be made 
by .3 judges, none of whom shall be com- 
petitors. 

i Conditions : Contestants must submit 2 
mounted prints, either silver, bromide, 
platinum or carbon, of each subject, which, 
as well ?.s the' negative, shall become the 
property of Recreation. Negatives not to 
be sent unless called for, ^ 

In submitting pictures, please write sim- ^ 
tftly your full name and address on the back 



of each, and number such prints as you 
may send, 1, 2, 3, etc. Then in a letter ad- 
dressed Photographic Editor, Recreation, 
say, for instance : 

No. 1 is entitled . 

Made with a camera. 

lens. 

plate. 

paper. 



On a 

Printed on 

Length of exposure, 



Then add any further information you 
may deem of interest to the judges, or ta 
other amateur photographers. Same as to 
Nos. 2, 3, etc. 

This -is necessary in order to save post- 
age. In all cases where more than the 
name and address of the sender <nd serial 
number of picture are written on the back 
of prints I am required to pay letter post- 
age here. I have paid as high a. f ; $2.50 on 
a single package of a dozen pictures, in ad- 
dition to that prepaid by the sencer, on ac- 
count of too much writing on th? prints. 

Any number of subjects may be sub- 
mitted. 

Pictures that may have been published 
elsewhere, or that may have been entered 
in any other competition, not available. No 
entry fee charged. 

Don't let people who pose for you look 
at the camera. Occupy them in some other 
zvay.„ Many otherwise fine pictures have 
failed to win in the former competitions 
because the makers did not heed this warn- 
ing. 



BUYING THE FIRST CAMERA. 

R. S. KAUFMAN. 

For the prospective buyer, a collection of 
catalogues of the different makes of cam- 
eras and the study of them will eventually 
result in his asking every one who knows 
anything about photography, "Which make 
do you consider" the best? Which do you 
prefer, plates or film? Which gives the 
best results, a box camera or a folding 
style? Is a tripod necessary? What kind 
of lens makes the best pictures?" 

If the prospective purchaser lives in the 
city, such questions can readily be answered 
by demonstrations, unless the dealer favors 
only one make, which is often the case, say- 
ing that films are superior to plates, etc. 
The person who does not have the oppor- 
tunity of a critical examination is seriously 
handicapped, and must arrive at a decision 
by learning from the pages of the catalogue 
what will best meet his needs. 

As to the make, one can always depend 
on the firms that advertise in Recreation. 
The names of Premo, Poco, Century, Ko- 
rona, Kodak, Hawk-Eye, Al- Vista, etc.,~are 
all reliable, and can be depended on. 

Plate or film, however, is a matter that 
requires individual consideration. Person- 
ally, I say plates, but as a dealer, when I 



AM A TE UR PHO TO GRAPH ) '. 



7$ 



have a customer I do not discriminate. 
1 explain the good and bad points of both 
plates and films. Seven-tenths of the be- 
ginners choose film cameras, because they 
can make 12 exposures in as many seconds. 
The average person buying a camera thinks 
that to make pictures it is only necessary to 
push a button, or squeeze a bulb, under 
any conditions of light, either outdoors or 
in. Films are much more expensive than 
plates, and there is but one grade to choose 
from. Plates are heavier, but many points 
are in their favor. One can have a 6 l / 2 x 
8y> camera, make pictures 6 l / 2 x 8^, 5x8, 
5 x 7, 4 x 5 or. Y A x 4%, by using kits. 
When occasion requires, an extra rapid 
plate can be used. Isochromatic and ortho- 
chromatic plates can be used to photograph 
flowers of different colors, thus giving an 
unlimited assortment of material to select 
from. 

The foundation of the picture is laid in 
developing. For an exposure made on a 
dull gray day, when the light is flat and 
there is no contrast, the developer can be so 
compounded that the contrast will be in- 
creased. An under exposure can more 
readily be controlled by developing prints 
one at a time ; while films are developed in 
the roll, of 6 or 12 exposures. 

The new film pack, just introduced by the 
Rochester Optical Company, makers of 
Premo cameras, will be hailed with delight. 
It is at present made in the 2>Ya x 4/4 Slze 
only, but will soon be made in all sizes. 
The film pack adapter closely resembles an 
ordinary plate holder. Two metal fasteners 
hold the back and front together. The 
front has a slide and is operated like a plate 
holder. The film pack and adapter are eas- 
ily manipulated. The pack is placed in the 
adapter, the back of which opens, and the 
adapter is then inserted in the camera ex- 
actly like a plate holder. The pack con- 
tains 12 films. When exposures are to be 
made, the slide is drawn out, the black 
paper tab is removed, and the slide can be 
replaced, and another object focused on. 
In this manner the 12 films may be exposed, 
or the film pack adapter removed and the 
plate holder used in the regular way. The 
film pack can be loaded and unloaded in 
daylight. This feature will be appreciated 
by plate enthusiasts, as a supply of film for 
several weeks may be included in one's lug- 
gage and exposures made in the same man- 
ner as if plates were used; whereas to carry 
this number of plates would be next to im- 
possible. 

The style of camera depends on the en- 
ergy you can spare. The box camera is 
made for plates or films, and no focusing 
is necessary, as the lenses are of the univer- 
sal focus type, and the picture in focus, or, 
in other words, clear, at all distances. This 
camera is all right for memorandum work, 



for children, or for one who does not wish 
to bother with focusing; but if you wish 
pictures, and intend to take up photography 
seriously, get a folding style ; one with a 
ground glass or focusing screen, so you can 
study your subject. 

Is a tripod necessary? Certainly, if you 
wish pictures. The camera should be held 
in the hand only in the case of instanta- 
neous exposures, not more than 1-25 of a 
second, so that the movement of the camera 
is not perceptible. By using a tripod ex- 
posures of any duration may be made ; and 
no one working for good results will make 
an exposure without a tripod. 

The lens question is important, and must 
be left to the pocketbook for decision. The 
best you can afford is none too good. 
Cameras, as regularly equipped, contain 
good lenses, but better results are assured 
from the start by getting a good lens of the 
anastigmat type, of which there are many 
good makes. A good lens is one that Works 
with a large opening or aperture, for quick 
exposures when desired, and can be used 
as a single lens when occasion demands. 

For real satisfaction, and perfect picture 
making, a camera with a long draw, or bel- 
lows, a good anastigmat lens, and a reliable 
make of plates are essential ; but with all 
this do not forget that the man behind the 
gun is the principal factor. 



AS TO PRIZE WINNERS. 
Would it not be advisable to divide the 
entries in your next photo competition into 
2 classes, putting the photos of wild animals 
together? They are more interesting, are 
much harder to get, and should win over 
ordinary pictures ; but the fellow who has 
neither the means nor the time to make a 
trip necessary to secure an animal subject 
does not stand much show, although his 
may be as artistic and pleasing a picture as 
the other fellow's. The wild animal class 
should have the more valuable prizes, but 
can you not make a second class, excluding 
wild animals ? 

H. J. Flint, Providence, R. I. 

ANSWER. 

I have thought a great deal about the 
proposition you make, for several years 
past, and have discussed it with several peo- 
ple, but have been unable to effect any plan 
that seemed better than the one I have been 
following. For 2 years past I have offered 
a special prize for the best picture of a wild 
animal, considered with reference to the 
general artistic qualities of the photograph ; 
and inasmuch as I do not give one person 2 
prizes, this has eliminated the best wild ani- 
mal picture from competition with the good 
ones of other subjects. If you have a file 
of Recreation for 5 or 6 years past and 
will go through them, examining carefully 



7 6 



RECREATION. 



the prize-winning pictures as published, you 
will find that in several cases the ist to 5th 
prizes have been awarded to other than ani- 
mal or bird pictures. Of course, many 
prizes have been given to pictures of live 
things ; but they have not taken all by any 
means, nor even all the best prizes. 

If I can hit on any plan of improving the 
present method of offering and distributing 
prizes so as to give the unfortunate stay-at- 
homes a better show, I shall be glad to do 
it. I realize that many expert amateur pho- 
tographers can not afford the time and ex- 
pense of going into the woods and making 
pictures of live wild animals or birds, and 
that they must therefore depend on subjects 
which can be reached within the bounds of 
civilization. — Editor. 



or trays. By care one can prevent trouble 
from these causes. 

R. L. Wadhams, M. D., 
Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 



A DEVELOPER FOR CYKO. 

Not being satisfied with my results on 

Cyko with metol hydroquinone, after trying 

a great many combinations I have settled on 

2 satisfying formulas : 

A. 

Water 4 ounces 

Sodium sulphite (anhydrous)... 1 dram 

Acetone sulphite 4 grains 

Edinal 18 

Sodium carbonate (anhydrous) . 45 

Potassium bromide, 5 per cent, solution, 
as needed. 

15. 

Water 4 ounces 

Sodium sulphite (anhydrous)... 2 drams 

Acetone sulphite 4 grains 

Edinal 18 

Potassium carbonate 1 dram 

Potassium, 5 per cent, solution, as needed. 

The potassium bromide is not made up 
with the stock solution, but is added with a 
dropper at time of development, as needed. 

Edinal is extremely sensitive to bromide's 
drop. One of a 5 per cent, solution in 
formula A is generally enough to hold the 
whites ; but this varies somewhat. Devel- 
opment is moderately slow, there is no 
choking of the high lights and the detail 
in the shadows is well brought out. The 
acetone sulphite restrains the development 
and gives a pleasant grayness to the half 
tones. It also tends to prevent the green- 
ish tinge given the black by the bromide. 

In formula B a little more bromide is re- 
quired. This formula gives a bluish tinge 
to the blacks, but this can be controlled by 
the addition of potassium, bromide, which, 
if added in sufficient quantity, will give pure 
blacks, but if added in excess will give 
greenish blacks. I use the regular cyko 
acid, fixing both, and get no blisters. The 
greater percentage of my failures were 
caused by iron or sulphur in the water, sul- 
phur in the air, or hypo from the hands 



SNAP SHOTS. 
What is the matter with my lens? If I 
focus on the center of the ground glass the 
sides are out of focus and if I focus on the 
sides the center is out of focus. I fitted the 
lens in the shutter myself. 

Ira Schryver, Deer Creek, Minn. 

ANSWER. 

If you will observe the manner in which 
your lens is ground you will see that its 
center is. actually nearer objects than its 
sides. The focal planes of center and sides 
are different; therefore, objects appearing 
at the sides will not be sharp when you 
focus with center of your lens. By stop- 
ping down with diaphragms so as to make 
most of the light rays pass through center 
of lens, sharper focus can be obtained. As 
you have not given the name of your lens, 
I can say little about its quality; but if the 
differences between the focal results of sides 
and center are great you can take it for 
granted that your lens is not of the late 
and improved sort. — Editor. 



I see that Stephen Mars, of Taunton, 
Mass., inquires if others are using Argo 
papers. I use it exclusively. I used Cyco 
a while, but it stained badly and was in- 
clined to develop unevenly, especially if de- 
veloper did not flow instantly over the en- 
tire surface of paper. I have the same 
trouble with Velox, in my developer, which 
is as follows : 

Water (distilled or soft) 4 ounces 

Metol 30 grains 

Shake well and add — 

Sodium sulphite (crystals).... ]/ 2 ounce 
Sodium carbonate (granular) . . % ounce 
Potassium bromide 2 l / 2 grains 

Shake until dissolved and use with 3 parts 
water. This is enough for 100 cabinet 
prints. 

C. E. Pleas, Chipley, Fla. 

A photographic expedition, organized 
and headed by G. O. Shields, editor of 
Recreation, will leave Donald, B. C, July 
28th. Mr. Shields contemplates a trip that 
for adventure and endurance will make 
better reading matter than has yet been 
provided by the intrepid explorer of the 
Northland. His route is North from 
Donald and West through the Yellowhead 
pass, thence South and East, coming out at 
Banff or Laggan. Four different summits 
have to be crossed. Mr. Shields will take 
photographs of wild animals and scenery. 
— B. C. paper. 



RECREATION. 77 



EASTMAN'S 

KodoidPlates 

ORTHOCHROMATIC 
NON-HALATION 



THE PERFECT SUBSTITUTE FOR GLASS 

USED IN ORDINARY PLATE HOLDERS WITHOUT 
KITS OR ADAPTERS 

KODOID PLATES consist of non-curling cut 
film, mounted by means of metal clips on a black 
cardboard. Before development they are handled 
precisely like glass plates. To develop, they are 
removed from cardboard by pulling off the clips, 
and are then developed in the usual manner. 

Superb in Speed, Latitude and Chemical Quality 
Light- — Convenient — Non-breakable 



KODOID PLATE PRICE LIST 



1% x4%, per dozen, . . $0.45 
4x5, per dozen, 65 



4^x 6)4, per dozen, 
5x7, per dozen, . . 



SOLD BY ALL KODAK DEALERS 

EASTMAN KODAK CCL Rochester. N*Y, 



78 



RECREATION. 



OBJECTS WELL CENTERED AND CORRECTLY FOCUSED 





no 



Hawfe= 





has the advantage 

over all cameras 

of a ground glass the size of picture, which works automatically and allows focusing 
when using film. The result is obvious — perfection of work — satisfaction to the user. 

No. 3 Focusing Weno HawK=Eye, with B. 6 L. Automatic Shutter, 

and Extra Rapid Rectilinear Lens. Pictures 3}i x 4%, = = =$27.50 

No. 4 Focusing Weno HawR=Eye, same equipment. Pictures 4x5, 30.00 

Hawk-Eye Film can be developed in the Kodak Developing Machine. 

Write for Havk-Eye Booklet. BLAIR CAMERA CO., Rochester, N. Y. 



Do you want 
AFoldmgCanvasBoat? 

IF SO, SEND ME 

35 yearly subscriptions 

to RECREATION 

AND I WILL SEND YOU 

A X4 ft* King folding canvas 

boat listed at $48 

capable of carrying 2 men 
and an ordinary camp outfit. 
There are thousands of these 
boats in use, and nearly ev- 
ery man who is using one of 
them praises it on every oc- 
casion. 

Sample copies of Recrea- 
tion for use in canvassing 
will be furnished on applica- 
tion. 



SPRING SHOOTER VS. EGG ROBBER 

B. T. I. 

Sportsman — "Well, Bob, what hick? 
Been out duck shooting again? You^still 
go hunting in the spring, I see." 

Spring Shooter- — "Yes, and only got 2 
ducks. If them fellers don't quit gatherin' 
eggs up North we won't have a duck left 
by fall." 

Sportsman — "True enough, Bob. But 
what is the difference between the spring 
shooter and the egg robber?" 

Spring Shooter — "Don't know, only 
them fellers ought to have a year in jail 
for every egg they steal." 

Sportsman — "You are right, they should ; 
but the difference is this: The man who 
steals the eggs, only gets the eggs, while 
the spring shooter gets the eggs and the 
duck at the same time. Therefore, you 
both should have a life sentence at hard 
labor." 

Free ; To anyone sending, through me, 
$1 for yearly subscription to Recreation, I 
will send free a No. 1 Sportsman's Medi- 
cine Case ; for 2 subscriptions a "Physi- 
cian's Pocket Medicine Case; for 10 sub- 
scriptions 1,200 12-gauge primed paper shot 
shells, This offer is not open to old sub- 
scribers who formerly have sent in their 
subscriptions to the office of Recreation^ 
but to all others. 

\Wev TavssovK Avdrr\ore^ ?■& 



RECREATION 



79 





The Pack 
acrid the Picture — 

A Very Simple Matter. 

Amateur photographers have received the new PREMO Film Pack with almost extrav- 
agant praises. It meets the conditions of the outdoor picture maker as nothing else 
has ever done. Whether you use a PREMO Plate Camera or a PREMO Film Camera, 
it opens the easy way to photography; — a working outfit that is unequalled for sim- 
plicity and convenience. 

The PREMO Film Pack 

DAYLIGHT LOADING 

As flat as a handkerchief in your pocket when not in use, as easy to load in daylight as 
shutting a book; it is unequalled for effectiveness. Carrying twelve non-curling, ortho- 
chromatic films ; successive exposures are made by pulling out the numbered black 
paper tabs. The last tab seals the package light tight. Adapted to 3% x ^ l A an d 4x5 
Cameras, the PREMO Film Pack meets successfully every photographic condition. 
See it at your dealer's or write for particulars contained in the Premo Year Book, free. 

ROCHESTER- OPTICAL CO.. Dept. 209, Rochester, N. Y. 



8o 



RECREATION. 









*£m 



AV..- •. 






& 






T JAKES everything within half a circle, making a picture five inches high by twelve 
inches long ; or you can stop the revolving lens at different points and make expos- 
ures either four inches long, or six inches, or ten, depending upon how much you 
want to get in the picture. No wasted film. The revolving lens moves at dif- 
ferent speeds, so you can gauge your exposure accurately* The exposure of the film is on the 
same principle as the focal plane shutter for pictures of moving objects* Our catalogue tells of 
its many uses — free. 

MULTISCOPE & FILM CO., 136 Jefferson St., Burlington, Wis. 



RECREATION. 



81 



- i 



C}> X 



>V 



PANORAMIC 



^'H 



THE HEIGHT OF ART 

in camera work 

Perfection in photography, has been 
secured by the use of the Al-Vista 
Camera. It produces the entire pan- 
oramic view — from tKe limit of 
vision on the left to the extreme 
point on tKe rignt. The Al-Vista 
Camera is compact: easy to use, sure 
in action. It is sold on its merits: 
we demonstrate this by selling you 
one 

on easy payments 

Ask us for a catalog: select the 
camera you wish, fill up the blank 
we shall send you, and references be- 
ing satisfactory we will at once send 
you a camera — pay weekly or month- 
ly in sums to suit your purse. The 
camera is no longer a luxury: the 
demands of modern progress make a 
good camera a necessity; we make it 
easy for you to get the best, an 

J\ f*-V 1 S f E e 

I 15he 

Multiscope & Film Co. 

136 Jefferson St. 

Burlington, Wls* e U* S 9 A, 



RECREATION 



LL ANOTHER GREAT OFFER 




racuse Gun 



Listed at $30 ■' 



FOR 



25 Yearly Subscriptions 



TO 



Recreation 



If you Want one of the Guns get a moye on you 

Sample copies for use in canvassing * 
furnished on application 



RECREATION, 23 W, 24th Street, New Yqrk 



RECREATION. 



XVI J 



YOUR VACATION 

Will not be completely enjoyable 
without the companionship of a 

riodern Binocular 

But dorit buy unless you get the 

Very Best Obtainable 

And when you're looking for the 
best, please bear in mind that the 

Turner = Reich 
Field Glass 







is backed by our GUARANTEE of OPTICAL PERFECTION 

This GUARANTEE, in turn, ir, backed by NINETEEN YEARS' study of OPTICAL 
and MECHANICAL theory, and by NINETEEN YEARS' EXPERI- 
ENCE in putting THEORY into PRACTICE. 

Write for Price List. It tells about the wonderful defining- and magnifying power, and the 
unprecedentedly large field of the TURNER-REICH BINOCULAR. 



QUNDLACH=MANHATTAN OPTICAL CO. 

730 So. Clinton Ave. ROCHESTER, N. Y. 




Will 



RECREATION. 



'V¥WV««VWW\ 



» 





are the finest in the world and the most for the money. 
Our New Catalogue tells why. Obtainable from all 
dealers free, or by mail direct. 




£ 



has won for them the high- 
est praise from connoisseurs 
everywhere. 

"Century Quality" is the 
result of twenty years' prac- 
tical experience. 
We invite a careful com- 
parison of " Centurys " with 
any other cameras, for com- 
parisons make the favorable 
comments regarding " Cen- 
tury Quality " still more 
numerous and emphatic. 

Century Camera Co*, 

Rochester, N. Y. 
** * ********* 



C!L PORTRAITS ON APPROVAL 

If you will send me a photo of your- 
self or a friend and state color of hair, 
eyes and complexion I will paint and 
send you on approval a miniature oil 

or pastel portrait. 

Canvas 6x8 < r 8xio inches, $10.00 
Canvas io.;i2 or 12x14 inches, ^S- 00 

Z. EMMONS, 53 West J04th St., New York 

Rei'ere:.ce : Mr. G. O. Shields. 



COLORED PHOTOGRAPHY 

Accomplished by the use of 




.A. Oly 



A new chemical compound which will produce prints 
colored true to nature. Booklet Sent Free. 

Beautiful specimens of work produced mounted and 
handsomely mailed, suitable for framing for 25c. in 
stamps. 

Complete outfit from your dealer or from us, express 
paid, $2, or smaller size $1, 



■ I iliw q i q » Uj wjwfrvw. 



"«b^s-s j . ' .^MDmjUUJmjJB 



ROCHESTER CHEMICAL CO* 
117 Wmi Mate HU ItOCllESsTfcll, N. Y, , 







IS TIRED NATURE'S 
SfE ET RESTORER 

After a hard day's tramp, you 
must have 

A GOOD NIGHT'S REST 

in order to fit you for the next 

day's work. 

Better to sleep on a good bed 

without your dinner, than sip at 

a banquet and then sleep on the 

cold, hard, wet ground. 

You can get 

A Recreation 

Camp Mattress 

of rubber, with valve for inflat- 
ing, made by the Pneumatic 
Mattress Co. and listed at $20 

For 20 Yearly Subscriptions 

to RECREATION 

Send for Sample CoJ»iu 
Address BEGBEiTlOM, 88 W, nth Street JUm Xm\ 



RECREATION. 



xix 



a***?v*****#**********+******************************+*******i£ 



A New 

Curtain 
Shutter 





Tho bostform of shutter for pho- 
tographing flying birds, animals in 
motion, athletic sports, bicycle races 
and all objects in rapid motion. 

OPERATES FROM "TIME " TO 1-1200TH OF A SECOND. 

The " Century" is the easiest to operate, the most compact, and the lightest curtain shutter 
in the market. An entirely new feature— and an original Century idea — is the method of 
adjusting the slot from the outside. Can be attached to both hand and tripod cameras. 

Price — 5 x 7, $25.00; 6)4 x °K> $30.00; 8 x 10, $35.00. 

Descriptive Circular and Speed Table 
mailed upon request. 



ENTURY CAMERA CO., Rochester, N.Y. 



g4|*£g&»j|i»jfei|£»£g££&»g^i^ 



Free : If you send your subscription to 
Recreation through me or direct to the 
office to be placed to my credit, I will send 
you free of charge, any one of the articles 
mentioned below: 

Shot gun bench crimper, sells for 75 cents, 
in 10-12-16-20 gauge. 

Shot gun cleaning rod, three attachments, 
sells for 50 cents, in 10-12-16 gauge. 

Micrometer powder and shot measure, 
adjustable, and for both black and smoke- 
less powder, sells for 65 cents. 

U. S. Government rifle cleaner, any cal- 
iber, with attachments, sells for to cents, 
packed in neat canvas bag. 

A duck, snipe or turkey call, sells for 75 
cents each, best made. 

A hand painted sporting picture, suitable 
for framing and just the thing for your den, 
worth $r-50. 

"Hunting in the Great West," by G. O. 
Shields. H. S. Hill, 815 nth Street, 
N. E., Washington, D. C. 



LANTERN SLIDES COLORED 

SKILLFULLY AND ARTISTICALLY 

FOR 

Lecturers, Teachers and others 



I refer by permission to the Editor of Recreation. 



MRS. C. B. SMITH 

606 W. 115th Street, New York City 



Something JVfet&! 




PRESTO! CHANGE! 

Attachable Eyeglass Temples 

Every wearer of eyeglasses wishes occasionally that they 
were spectacles. Spectacles stay on, however violent one's 
exercise, however warm or stormy the weather. This little 
device can be readily attached or detached without injury to 
the lenses, thus in a second giving you the choice of either 
spectacle or eyeglass. Just the thing for outdoor sports. 
The Temple Attachment will fit any of your eyeglasses and 
can be carried in the same case with them. 

S^nd thickness of lens when ordering' by mail. 

Price in Nickel, 50 cents a pair 

Price in Gilt, 75 cents a. pair. 
Senu for Circular* 

Our illustrated catalogue can be had for the asking 
We carry everything in the Optical and Photographic line 
Eyeglasses, Spectacles, Cameras, Opera, Field or Marine 
Glasses, Thermometers. Barometers, Telescopes, Hygrom- 
ers, Sun-dials, etc. 

GALL & LEMBKE, Department C. 
1 W. 42d Street 21 Union Sq., New York 

Establishad 1842. 



XX 



RECREATION. 



Do You Want a Gun? 



• * 



Send me 30 yearly subscriptions to 
RECREATION and I will send you a 



1.1 



bMlolDl 



pnnn 

JUUIl u 



(I 



Hade by the Ithaca Gun Co. 
and Listed at $40 

I have contracted for 20 of these 
guns at a price which enables me to 
offer them as above, and they will 
doubtless all be taken within the next 
3 months. 

If You Want One Get Busy at Once 

Sample copies of RECREATION for 
use in canvassing furnished on application 



RECREATION, 23 West 24th St., New York. 



RECREATION. 



xxi 



The Rocky 
Mountain Goat 

Is a shy, wary animal that ranges 

8,000 to 15,000 feet 

above sea level 

and has rarely been photographed. 
Mr. A. M. Collins, one of Recrea- 
tion's prize winning photographers 
has recently made 4 of the finest 
goat pictures ever produced. I 
have had enlargements made from 
these, 13 x 15 inches, and will sell 
them 

At $5.00 a Set. 

A rare and valuable group for 
sportsmen, amateur photographers 
and nature students. Address 

RECREATION, new york city 



Something Special — Playing Cards 
Free: — To each person sending me $1 for 
one year's subscription to Recreation, or 
sending it direct to be placed to my credit, 
I will forward, all charges prepaid, a pack 
of elegant gold edge playing cards. These 
are no cheap second quality cards but first 
quality, of extra selected stock, highly 
enameled and polished, fancy set pattern 
backs, each pack wrapped in handsome 
glazed wrapper and packed in strong tele- 
scope case. 

L. J. Tooley, 
141 Burr Oak St., Kalamazoo, Mich. 






|j I Everywhere Acknowledged 



~^r 




Catalog 
Free 



*..v»„ 



Bausch&Lomb, 

Lenses ^Shutters 

$3,000.00 offered for phafefcmade with them 

Rochester, 'N«Y. 

NEW YORK. BOSTON. CHICAGO. 



There is, in France, a society for the 
prevention of cruelty to animals. Men visit 
it each year to apply for the medal it gives 
annually. It's president is a joker. One 
day a peasant came to this association and 
laid claim to the medal. 

"What have you done to deserve it?" 
asked the president. 

"I have saved a wolfs life, sir," said the 
peasant. 

"What had the wolf been doing?" 

"It had killed my wife." 

"Then," said the president, "you need no 
medal, for you are already sufficiently re- 
warded." — New York Tribune. 




GRAPHOL 

Photo-Sensitizing Powders. 

For making Photos on silk, cotton, linen, duck-canvas, private 
stationery, envelopes, postal cards, glass, (transparencies), wood, etc. 
Graphol Blue (Azurol) full size bottle 25c. 
" Brown (Sepiol) trial " 25c. 

" " " full size •' 75c. _ 

These latest, most unique, preparations are just being introduced. 
Your dealer may not carry them in stock as yet. We are, therefore, 
prepared to send you bottles with directions on receipt of amount in 
stamps, coin or money order, by mail prepaid. 

Do not fail to try these powders ; they will give you more pleasure 
and satisfaction than you anticipate. 

90 William St., 
new york city. 



Graphol Chemical Go. 



P. S.— Dealers will please apply for terms to riallinckrodt Chemical 

Works, St. Louis and New York, who will supply the wholesale trade. 




XX11 



RECREATION. 



':•.: : : : -.J^ tvL^a 



:::::>:::5:;:;:;?;:;>:;:i: ::::::::<:^;:!:;n:;:;:::::;:;:;::: 



VELOX 

Liquid Developer 

Made especially for Velox by the Velox 
people — it makes Velox better than ever- — 
and that is saying a great deal. 



Four-ounce bottle Concentrated Solution, 25 cents. 



ALL DEALERS. 



LOOK FOR 







Lj^ 

* 




THE LABEL. 







NEPERA DIVISION, 

EASTMAN KODAK CO. 

Rochester, N. Y. 



RECREATION. 



xxin 



LUCK ON MUD MARSH. 
On the ist of October, 1901, Buck and 1 
took the train for McKeever, N. Y., where 
we were met by our old guide and hunting 
companion, Jim T., and driven 10 miles to 
his house. It seemed as if our heads had 
hardly touched the pillow that night when 
we were being pulled out of bed by Jim. 
We slipped on our hunting togs and were 
soon on our way to the marsh. Jim's set- 
ter scared up 2 birds, one of which Buck 
secured with his 12 gauge Parker. As his 
gun went off, a ruffed grouse flew out of a 
bush near and I killed it. Then we separat- 
ed, I going to a slight eminence on which 
were a few trees. In a short time I heard 
a loud rustling and the air was filled with 
grouse. I fired, getting a bird, and another 
with the second barrel. Reloading quickly, 
I got 2 more and would have killed others 
had I not remembered the teaching of a 
certain red and yellow covered magazine 
that I swear by. Picking up the birds I 
joined my friends. Jim had secured 3 and 
Buck 4, making 11 birds among us. 

T. H. Leake, Menando, N. Y. 



Received the Bristol steel rod. It is all 
right, both from aesthetic and practical 
standpoints. It is without doubt the best 
and cheapest thing I have ever owned in 
this line, and the work of securing sub- 
scriptions for it was one of the easiest 
tasks I have ever had, considering the gen- 
erous remuneration. 

A. M. Bowman, Camp Hill, Pa. 

WANT A REEL? 

You can get one for nothing. 

Or at least for a few hours' -work. 

Send me 

15 Yearly Subscriptions 

RECREATION 

and I will send you 

A TALBOT REEL 

Listed at $20*00 

Hade by W. H. Talbot, Nevada, flo 

This is one of the finest pieces of fishing 
tackle ever made. It is built like a gold 
watch. Equal to any Kentucky reel you 
ever saw. 

In Tournaments, Always a Victor 
Among the Angler's Treasures, Always the Chief 

I have but a few of these reels in stock 
and this offer will be withdrawn as soon as 
the present supply is exhausted. 

Sample copies of Recreation for use in canvassing 
furnished on application. 




Photographic Perfection 

is attained by making your negatives on 

ANSCO I THE NEW DAYLIGHT LOADING FILM 
and your prints on 

CYKO! THE PAPER THAT PRINTS AT NIGHT 

ANSCO and CYKO have no peers in Keeping 1 Quality and in 
Latitude of Exposure and Development. 
Trial Dozen 4x5 CYKO and Developer, 20 cents. 

ANSCO films are made under the celebrated Goodwin Patent 
and are adapted for Kodak's. Bull's-eyes and all Film Cameras. ^-^ 

CYKO Manual and ANSCO Booklet sent on application. C > 

THE ANTHONY (Si SCOVILL CO 

123-124 Fifth Ave., New York. Atlas Block, Chicago 



PRINTS 

IN ANY LIGHTi 



I 



From daylight to candle-light you are sure 
Cl twelve perfect prints from each dozen 
sheets. 

PRICES : 
4x5, 15c doz. 6^ x 8^, 55c. doz. 
5x7, 30c, •* 8 x 10, 70c. " 
If you want the best bromide paper, buy 
"Rbtograph." 

Sample copy of the Photo Critic, contain- 
ing eveiy month articles on "The A to Z 
of Photography." Of interest to amateur 
and professional. Sent on request. 
Subscription $i per year. Write 

ROTOGRAPH 

Dept. V 101 Fifth Avenue, - N. Y. CITY 




XXIV 



RECREATION. 



A MIX UP WITH A GAME HOG. 

BILL BROKEN OSE. 

I keep a sort of hotel at Frog Holler. 
Mebbe you've heard of it. Lots of fellers 
come to my place a sportin'. Any time 
you want to try it, jest foller Bullpout 
creek, South from the road, till you come 
to Pollywog pond. Then you'll see my 
hostillery. You can't miss it 'cause you'll 
have to come through my garden spot and 
you'll hear me a hollerin' to you to git 
out. 

Last fall 2 fellers came down and said 
they would like to stay a couple of weeks 
a huntin' and a fishin'. I told 'em they 
could stay as long as they could pay.. They 
said that was all right and to let 'em know 
when the time was up. They had the big-, 
gest lot of guns and truck I ever seen. 

Next mornin', when they was goin' a 
huntin', one of 'em sez, "Do you like iVIag- 
gie Zenes?" 

I told him I didn't know any woman by 
that name. 

"Who's talkin' 'bout women?" sez he. 
"I've got some old maggie zenes in my 
trunk and p'raps you might like to look 
at 'em." 

Then I remembered that a maggie zene 
was a part of a gun. I didn't know just 
what part, but I'd heard fellers talk about 
emptyin' 'em at a deer. So I sez, "Well, 
if they ain't loaded I'll look 'em over for 
you and p'raps ile 'em up." 

The feller went in the house and brought 
out 2 or 3 books, and gave 'em to me and 
sez, "I think you will like these." 

"But," sez I, "where is the maggie 
zenes?" 

"You've got 'em in your hand," he sez. 

"What are you tryin' to stuff me with?" 
sez I, gettin' my dander up. "Don't you 
suppose I know a book from a maggie 
zene?" 

They both laffed and went off without 
sayin' nothin', but they couldn't josh me, 
nohow. So I sot down to look at the 
books. They was the Re-creations and 
I liked 'em first rate. There was bully 
pictures in 'em of birds and animals, and 
there was one fine picture of a man with a 
big pile of fish. I bet there was over 200 
of 'em. Gee whillikins ! the feller was 
lucky if he wasn't han'some. A'cordin' to 
the book his name was A. Western Shoat 

It took me nearly a week to read them 
books, but I read every word in 'em. In 
one it said there was a game hog a rav- 
?gin' the country, and I thought if the 
fellers could only kill it it would make a 
diff'ence in the grub. They had been 
gittin' only deer, and hog meat would have 
tasted good after so much deer. I spoke 
to the fellers about it and they winked at 
each other and laffed, and said they wished 
they could run across that hog. But they 
didn't git it 

One Sunday mornin' the fellers started 
out, but pretty soon they came back and 



stood their guns against the house and 
said they wouldn't go a shootin' till after- 
noon. They hadn't killed nothin' for 
some time and meat was gettin' scarce. I 
kept thinkin' about that hog and how 
mighty fillin' he'd be for dinner. At last 
I took one of the guns without the fellers 
knowin' it, and went out the back way with 
my mind made up to find that hog. 

I knew a spot about a mile off that I 
thought was a good enough rootin' place 
for any hog, and I went there. I got to 
where I was headin', in due season, but I 
couldn't find no hog. I hunted all around 
without findin' him till I thought it was 
time to be gittin' home. I was almost back 
when I heard a most awful scratchin' and 
a tearin' in the bushes close to me. There 
was a big log right handy, and I got be- 
hind it kind of quick. I just had time to 
shove the gun across the log to'ards the 
noise when out rushed somethin' as big 
as a horse and a comin' right for me. I 
didn't lose no time pullin' the trigger, and 
jest then somethin' hit me plumb in the 
face and knocked me 5 feet and over. 1 
don't know to this day if it was the hog 
or if I was hit by lightnin'. I thought my 
time had come anyway, so I just lay still 
and shut my eyes and said prayers. Before 
I got to amen somethin' began to bark like 
all creation. I was curious to know what 
kind of a hog could bark, so I opened my 
eyes a bit. Darn me if there was any hog 
there ; nothin' but my old dog Toze, a 
barkin' for keeps. I reckon he'd drove 
the critter away. 

Well, my face was all covered with blood 
and my nose was so sore I couldn't touch 
it. Thinks I, "that's enough huntin' for 
me," so I picked up the gun and went 
home. The fellers was astandin' outside 
and they asked me what was the matter. 
I told 'em I'd been a huntin' that game 
hog. 

"Did you find it?" sez they. 

"I did, you know," sez I, "and I vvisht 
I hadn't." 

They laffed and sez if I couldn't do bet- 
ter than that I'd better quit huntin'. One 
of 'em told me my nose was broke and 
that the gun kicked me ; they thought they 
could stuff me; jest as if I didn't know 
that a gun hasn't any feet to kick with. 

That was the last time I went a huntin', 
but I'm willin' to cook game if other fel- 
lers will bring it in. If ever you want to 
come here to hunt jest let me know, 
Mebbe you could find that hog ; he is too 
game for me. I like your book and would 
send you $1 for it, only I forgot- to tell 
those fellers when the time was up and 
they went away without paying me. 



Captain — What is strategy in war? "Give 
me an instance of it. 

Sergeant — Shtrategy is whin ye don't let 
the enimy dishcover that ye'r' out of am- 
munition, but kape roight on foirjn\ — The 
Moon, 



RECREATION. 



XXV 




SAVING UP 



MONEY NOT THE ONLY 
THING TO PUT BY. 



POVERTY in old age is pitiable, but how much sadder is broken health. Proper food in youth 
insures health in old age. But if the body is slugged with wrong food or drink, good health 
cannot result. Many are wise with money but wasteful of health. 

You cannot save money if you squander it nor save health if you waste it. More health is 
wasted on improper food and drink than in any other way. Coffee and tea contain strong drugs 
that directly affect the heart and other organs and the nerves. They have ruined many, and hurt 
nearly all who drink them. Sometimes coffee tears down tissue so rapidly that its ill effects are 
shown almost as soon as drinking it is begun. In others, it works so slowly that years pass be- 
fore collapse. In a few, it apparently works no harm, and these are held up to the world by the 
unthinking as proof positive that "Coffee does not hurt. " 

Wrong nine times out of ten, for not more than one person in ten can drink coffee and not 
suffer. To prove this, see how many coffee drinkers you can find who are perfectly well. Maybe 
you have tried to stop and failed, because there are two ways and you tried the wrong one. 

Get a package of POSTUM FOOD COFFEE (which is made from the purest cereals) and 
carefully read directions. Make it strong, boil it thoroughly, serve it hot, It is then a rich seal 
brown. Add sugar and cream and it becomes a tempting golden brown in color. The aroma is 
appetizing, so is the taste. It does not taste exactly like coffee. The flavor is original, and you 
will soon grow to like it for this. You can drink it at all meals, certain that it will give you health, 
strength and vigor. It will steady and quiet your nerves and induce sweet natural sleep, not from 
any drug, but from food which Nature calls for and is quiet when supplied. That's why a well- 
fed baby sleeps well. 

Coffee injures nine out often. 

POSTUM positively does restore health and vigor to the nervous coffee wreck, 

There is a reason. 



XXVI 



RECREATION. 



Club 
Cocktails 



Famous the world 
over for purity. 
They never vary. 
The secret of their 
perfect blend is that 
they are kept six 
months before being 
drawn off and bot- 
tled. Be sure you 
have them in your 
camp, on the yacht, 
and on your outing 
trips wherever you 
go. They are ready and require no 
mixing. Simply pour over cracked ice. 

For Sale by all Fancy Grocers and Dealers 

Q. F. HEUBLEIN & BRO. 

29 BROADWAY, H. Y. HARTFORD, COMB. 




Hotel Lenox 

Boylston and Exeter Sts. 
BOSTON. MASS. 



250 Rooms, 125 Baths. 

All with Outside Exposure 
Fireproof. European Plan. 
Long Distance Telephone 
in every room. 

Five minutes to the heart 
of the business, amusements 
and shopping districts. 



Ainslie & Grabow 

PROPRIETORS 




n 



If so, why not get a good one ? 
And why not get it free of charge? 
This is easy. 

Any old box will answer the purpose if it 
does not leak light; but you must have 
a fine lens to make a fine picture. . 

You can get 

A Royal Anastigmat 
Lens, 4x5, Series No. 1 

Made by the Rochester Lens Co., Rochester, 
New York, 

And listed at $45, 

For 20 yearly subscrip= 

tions to RECREATION 

You can get any other lens made by this 
Company on a basis of one subscription 
tq $2. of the list price of the lens. 

Sample copies of Recreation for use in 
soliciting furnished on application. 

(EXTRAORDINARY OFFER. 

To any person sending me $i for a year's 
subscription to Recreation,, I will give free 
one of the following books: 6th and 7th 
Books of Moses. This is a great book. 
Every home should have one. Volumes 
I. -II., bound together in one volume; reg- 
ular price is $1. "The Almighty Dollar" is 
a new book just published, and is worth 
its weight in gold to any one. Can not be 
obtained for less than $1 anywhere. 

"Hunter's Guide and Trapper's Compan- 
ion." This is a book every hunter and 
trapper should have. Descriptions of these 
books will be sent for a stamp. This is the 
•greatest offer ever made, and you should 
not let this pass. Old subscribers may avail 
of 'this offer by sending 10 cents extra. 
Address Henry Nelson, Eckwoll, Minn." 

Allow me to congratulate you on your 
success in bringing so large a share of Na- 
ture's gifts, her freedom, pure air, and 
warm sunshine, and her rarer gifts hidden 
from all save those who have made her 
their boon companion and guide, into the 
dreary, dusty offices of the city. One can 
not read your charming magazine without 
feeling in a measure the same delightful 
thrills that filled his whole being when as a 
boy he grasped his gun or rod and stepped 
out_ into the sunshine for his weekly half 
holiday. A half hour among its pages is 
indeed recreation. 

T. W. Burgess, Springfield, Mass. 



RECREATION. 



Nothing Secret about 

rangeine 

Powders— 

Its composition is as open as its results are prompt, 
and is published in direction booklet in eVery package. 

NOTE The varied and numerous uses of Orangeine have been evolved "by Humanity for Humanity," and Its 
wide claims would seem ridiculous were they not suggested and sustained by countless human experiences. 




The Principle of Orangeine. 

Orangeine combines both schools of 
medicine, and illustrates the following 
great principle now advocated by all 
progressive physicians, viz.: The con- 
certed, concordant action of remedies skillfully 
selected and combined, is vastly greater than 
the action of the same remedies, alternately 
prescribed. 



What Orangeine is Doing for Humanity. 

Orangeine supplies almost instant re- 
lief from pain, prompt correction for the 
little ills which lead to serious ailment, 
and a gradual, far reaching reconstruc- 
tive power from extreme physical debil- 
ity, and the stubborn symptoms which 
cause chronic ailments. 



Orangeine Applications Widely Demonstrated. 

Heat Prostration, Headache (all kinds) Hay Fever, 

Neuralgia, 
Nervousness, 
Sea Sickness* 
Car Sickness, 



— — — — — — _ _ — — __ w 

Stomach Upsets, 
Bowel Troubles, 
Indigestion, 
Dyspepsia, 



and a host of common ailments. 



Asthma, 
Colds, 
Grip, 
Fatigue, 



Orangeine Dispels Hay Fever. 

During the past five years, Orangeine has made a phenomenal record for the relief of xiay 
Fever, in even most stubborn and long continued cases. Thousands of former sufferers 
have, through Orangeine, found immunity which they could not find at any Hay Fever 
resort, and our advice has been everywhere confirmed to Hay Fever sufferers, to "Stay at 
Home or Go Anywhere," provided they TAKE Orangeine, under our simple directions. 

A Few Suggestive Experiences. 



Mr. J. A. Waldron, Managing: Edi- 
tor of The New York Dramatic Mir- 
ror, says: "I am not only a steady 
user of 'Orangeine' Powders, being 
of an age when their singular and 
admirable stimulating powers prove 
very beneficial, and being also sub- 
ject to Hay Fever in summer and 
Grip in winter; but I have formed the 
philanthropic habit of dispensing 
them to friends, for various tem- 
porary ailments which 'Orangeine' so 
accurately roaches. 

"From my experience, I predict 
that the wonders of 'Orangeine' are 
yet in their infancy." 

P. J. t Cunningham, Leslie, Mich., 
writes: " 'Orangeine' is the only rem- 
edy that has given me any relief from 
'hay fever,' and I have tried a great 
number." 



Mr. Frank T. Bliss, of Morris, 
111., describes his experience: 
"I have been a sufferer from hay 
fever for over twenty years, have 
tried every remedy obtainable, 
but until this year I have been 
compelled to spend the hay fever 
season in northern Michigan. I 
have been enabled to stay at 
home this year with perfect free- 
dom from this dread disease by 
using 'Orangeine' powders as 
directed." 

Mr. 0. J. Carpenter, Killduff, la., 
writes: " 'Orangeine' has cer- 
tainly helped me. Have been us- 
ing it for 'hay fever.'" 

Miss Nella Miles, Stockton, N.Y., 
writes: "I find 'Orangeine' very 
good for 'hay fever.' " 



Miss Hattie McClelland, Madison, 
Ind., writes: "Have taken four pow- 
ders a day, and am getting along fine. 
Have had only slight attack of 'hay 
fever' so far, and am perfectly free 
from it to today, something that has 
never happened before at this season 
of the year." 

Mr. Conrad Rockel, Dallas City, 111., 
writes: "'Orangeine' is doing me 
much good. I think two boxes more 
will keep 'hay fever' off entirely." 

Mrs. I. E. Lansing, Marshall, Mich., 
writes: "I find it the best thing I ever 
tried, and I have tried everything." 

Miss Bernice Button, Little Rock, 
Ark., writes: "Orangeine makes one 
feel more like working. More like 
living. The powders are so simple, 
so easy to take, so convenient to 
carry, and yet so effective." 



TTVia! Pl%<pIrA<ro tTfi*00 Orangeine is sold by druggists everywhere in 25c, 50c and SI. 00 packages. 
a i ras sr ca^SMB3*5 «• 1 CC q u receipt of request we will mail 10c trial package Free with full direc- 
tions, composition and description of its wide human influences. Address "Orangeine, Chicago.' 



XXV 111 



RECREATION. 



In happy homes, ivherever found, 

One hears the Washburn's merry sound 

They pl-ay 



5 H BURN 




Mandolins 

^ BANJOS 



Unequaled for Tone, Durability 
and Workmanship. 

We will gladly send free a beautiful Art 
Souvenir Catalogue and "Facts About The 
Mandolin" and "How to Play The Man- 
dolin" if you will send us your address on 
a postal card. 

YON & HEALY, *&!££?. •*■• 

The World's Largest Mcsic House. Sells "Everything Known in Music." 




Beautifies the teeth, hard- 
ens the gums, sweetens the 
breath. Preserves as well 
as beautifies the teeth. 
Comes in neat, bandy metal 
boxes. No powder to 
scatter, no Jiquid to 
spill or to stain gar- 
ments. 

25 Cents 
At all Druggists. 




C. H. STRONG & CO., Proprietors, 
Chicago, U. S. A. 



I received the Harrington & Richardson 
revolver yon sent me as, a premium. Am 
well satisfied and thank you for it. 

I. W. Marsh, Hunter, N. Y. 



DOMER GOES A-FISHING. 

L. S. P. 

Had I the talent of ancient Homer, 
I'd sing of Willie Domer, 
And set all the sporting men to wishing 
They to the river could go a-fishing. 

And yet this same redoubtable Domer 
This rancorous, rampant, roaring roamer, 
While fishing out at Dickerson Station 
Was matched by a turtle and lost his ration. 

This sad event, says Mrs. Grundy, 
Fell to the lot of William last Sunday: 
He caught his fish, it was a whopper, 
And put it away where he thought proper. 

He put it into a little pool 
And hunted a drink of "something cool." 
The boys all told him, "Better look out, 
A turtle is sure to eat that trout !" 

"Who's boss of this fish?" our Willie said; 
"Go hang up your jaw and soak your head; 
You don't know what you are talking 

about ; 
I'll swallow the turtle that eats my trout !" 

Long tarried our Willyum with his lunch, 
Till the other fishermen caught their bunch ; 
Then he calmly looked for the fish he'd 

caught, 
'Twould lay the rest in the shade, he 

thought. 

Great Caesar ! You ought to have seen his 

frown ; 
A turtle had gobbled his big fish down; 
There wasn't a scale nor a piece of fin 
To show where our Willie's fish had been. 

Raw turtle on toast ! Stand up to the rack, 
Stick to your contract and commence the 

attack ; 
"Yon said you'd swallow it, don't back 

out," 
Said the crowd to the man who caught the 

trout. 

And that is why our Willie swears 
That to go a-fishing he no more cares ; 
There's chills and fever up the Potomac, 
And turtle that's raw ain't good for the 
stomach. 



Judge — What is your profession? 
Witness — I'm a poet, your Honor. 
Judge — That's not a profession ; it's 3 
disease. — Exchange. 




flusic Boxes 



For the Home, it is come 
pany at all times, wiil 
cheer you when you are 
sad; a veritable need when you are lonely; an accompaniment 
to your song, and play Dance music in perfect time. A boon 
to all music lovers. Our variety is great; prices to suit all. 
Our No. 20 costs only $2.50, while our No. 191 runs in the hun- 
dreds. Complete Catalogues FREE. 

E. L. CUENDET, 7 Barclay St., NewYork 



RECREATION. 



XXIX 



y^ | TWO SPLENDID BOOKS FOR w-^ | 

rrCC! Hunters, Sportsmen, ll CC! 

^^^^= Campers Out, Etc. Etc. ^^^^= 



Fairly bristles with facts and information from start to finish. 
Two complete up to-date volumes, entirely covering the subject of 
"Camping Out and Outfits." 



Pronounced by the very best 
authorities the irost practical 
work ever published on the 
subject. — A Handsome volume. 



Glitters with Pictvires 
from Cover to Cover 

196 PAGES. In aJl 

over 200 Illustrations 

Bovind in Linen, 5 Col- 
or Covers 

Size, 6y^ x 4^ inches 
FREE! 




Brimful! of brainy 
facts exhaustively cover- 
ing every subject from A 
to Z, interesting and of 
instructive value and ser- 
vice to every sportsman 
and camper out, old or 
young. We have thou- 
sands of letters from all 
over the World (some 
from noted sportsmen), 
who congratulated us upon these books. Contains a thousand facts 
of value never before put in print, and there is scarcely a campaigner 
anywhere, no matter how old or experienced he may be, who cannot 
learn something from these books. They are better than some books 
sold at $1.00 a copy. 

They are Free to You on receipt of ioc, coin or stamps to 
cover cost of mailing them to you. Address 



If yovi be wise write a^t 
once for these books; 
they'll surprise you 



**B\IZZaLCOtt" Dept. A 
COMPLETE CAMP OUTFITTER 



Racine Junction, Wis. or 

Mention Recreation. 



Chicago, III., U. S. A 



XXX 



RECREATION. 




Varicocele 
Hydrocele 



Cured to Stay Cured in 5 Days* 
No Gutting or Pain B Guaranteed 
Cure of Money Refunded. 

\j A T%Mfki%g%a C Under my treatment this insidi- 
vMr£M%*U%*MLLSZm ous disease rapidly disappears. 
Pain ceases almost instantly. The stagnant blood is driven 
1 from the dilated veins and all soreness and swelling sub- 
sides. Kvery indication of Varicocele vanishes and in its 
stead comes the pleasure of perfect health. Many ailments 
are reflex, originating from other diseases. For instance, 
innumerable blood and nervous diseases result from poison- 
ous taints in the system. Varicocele and Hydrocele, if neg- 
lected will undermine physical strength, depress the mental 
faculties, derange the nervous system, and ultimately pro- 
duce complicated results. In treating diseases of men I 
always cure the effect as well as the cause. I desire that 
every person afflicted with these or allied diseases write me 
so I can explain my method of cure, which is safe and per- 
manent. My consultation will cost you nothing, and my charges for a perfect cure will be reasonable and 
not more than you will be willing to pay for the benefits conferred. 

f%g*m*4s*it%t\l nt QuM+£* is what y° u want. I give a legal guaranty to cure or refund your money. 
%&&§ lemmniy %9M %jmm vs -^jjat I have done for others I can do for you. I can cure you at home 

Correspondence Confidential. ffig£S2^«£^%!S%g2£™ 

dition fully, and you will receive in plain envelope a scientific and honest opinion of your case, Free of 
charge. My home treatment Is successful* My books and lectures mailed free upon application. 

H. J.TILLOTSON, M.D.,140 Tillotson Bldg,84 Dearborn St., CHICAGO 



H. J. TILLOTSON, M. D. 

The Master Specialist of Chicago, who Cures Varicocele, 

Hydrocele, and treats patients personally. 

Established 1880. 

( Copyrighted ) 




FREE BOOK, WEAK MEN 

My illustrated nature book on losses 
varicoce e, impotency, lame back, free 
sealed, by mail. Much valuable advice 
and describes the new DR. SANDEN 
^ERCULEX ELECTRIC BELT. 
'Worn nights. No drugs. Currents 
soothing. Used by women also for 
rheumatic pains, etc. 5,000 cures 1902 
Established 30 years. Advice free. 
DE. G. B. SANDEN, 

1155 Broadway, N.Y. 

The Best Offer Yet.— To any person who 
will subscribe to Recreation for one year 
through me I will send free a small water 
color landscape, hand painted, suitable for 
framing ; or a hand painted silk bookmark. 
For two subscriptions I will send a fine 
Mexican opal scarf pin worth ordinarily 
from f>i to $1.50. 

D01 M. Harris, 308 Crawford Road, 
Cleveland, Ohio. 



iNNENB 



BORATED 
TALCUM 




fiOVDER 



os, j^eT^ne7 



PRICKLY HEAT. 
CHAFING, and 
SUNBURN, $ f nd t^ ll s ^ iction * 

"A little higher in price, pethtps, than worthiest svtstl- 
stitutes. bat t reason for it."'' Removes ill odor of per«pl 



mloa. Delightful titer Sbtvlng. Sold everywhere, ©r'miifed 
receipt of 25c Get Meaoca't (the oTtysnli. Stmptt fm. 



Do you want a Good, Reliable, 
Substantial, Well Made 

Single Barrel Shot Gi 

If so, send me 
JO YEARLY SUBSCRIPTIONS 

and I will send you such a 
Gun as a premium 

It is made by the DA VENPORT ARMS 
CO., and this means it is made of good 
material and that only good workmanship 
is put on it. 

This is one of the many remarkable op- 
portunities RECREATION is offering to 
men and boys to fit themselves out com- 
pletely for shooting and fishing. 

Sample Copies for Use in Canvassing; 
Furnished on Application. 



Address 



RECREATION 



23 W- 24th St 



Newark Gtx 



IF YOU WOULD LIVE NEXT TO 
NATURE, READ RECREATION. 



RECREATION. 




Water 
Would Cure 



aches and pains; heal cuts and bruises; subdue inflammation, 
hemorrhages, soreness, lameness, scalds, burns, insect bites 
and stings, sunburn, neuralgia and rheumatism, POND'S 
EXTRACT would never have gained its world wide fame as 
cc King" of pain cures. For 60 years it has been alleviating 
pain of all kinds. 

Don't be misled by the claim that POND'S EXTRACT is the 
same as witch hazel. POND'S EXTRACT CURES. Ordinary 
witch hazel is practically all water — that's why it WON'T cure. 
That's why you can get so much for so little — water is cheap. 
Insist on POND'S EXTRACT — the true extract of Hamamelis 
Virginica and accept no other. The true cure for all pain. 

Sold only in sealed bottles, enclosed in buff wrappers. 



To Recreation Readers : I am or- 
ganizing a club of subscribers for Recrea- 
tion, with a view to securing a premium, 
and I submit this offer; to each person 
sending me $i for yearly subscription to 
Recreation, I will send a 25c. Dominion 
of Canada bank note. There are but a few 
of these in circulation and I have suc- 
ceeded in collecting a number of them. 
These are interesting souvenirs and are 
especially valuable to persons who are 
making collections of coins or other curios. 
Walter Legare, 518 John St., Quebec, Can. 



Three years ago I bought a Marlin 22 
caliber, take down, pistol grip gun. As long 
as I held the barrel level, things went nice- 
ly, but the instant I elevated the barrel it 
stuck. I finally traded it, with $8 to boot, 
for a Winchester take down. I also 
owned a Marlin shot gun, and would 
consider the gift of another an insult. My 
advice to all inquirers is : Buy any old 
muzzle loader rather than a Marlin. 

As to Peters ammunition, I hope I may 
shoot myself with the next I buy. 

C S. Scribner, Dayton, O. 




48c. 



ground 




LEAVE A KNIFE BEHIND YOU 

for your Guide or Host or Boatman ; he 
will think of you longer than if it was 
a $10 bill. If "Maher & Grosh" is on 
the blade he knows the quality. Deal 
direct with us and get our best service. 
This cut is "Chauncey Depew's 
Pet," has three blades (one is a hie). 
Handle is choicest selected pearl; Ger- 
man silver back and ends. Price, in 
chamois case, $1.50, postpaid. Same 
,. knife, 2 blades, $1 ; plainer finish, 3 

blades, Same quality, $1 ; smaller, 2 blades, for ladv, $1; plainer finish, 
75 cents; Razor Steel Jackknife, 2 blades, price 
70 cents, but 48 cents for a while; % for $2. 
and 60 cent shears for $1. Hollow 
tzor, Strop and Brush, $1.33. Illus- 
trated 80-page list free, and " How 
to Use a Razor." 

Be kindly; write -us. 



Maher & Grosh Co. 

74 A Street Toledo, Ohio 



xxxii RECREATION. 



ANOTHER GREAT OFFER 

TO AMATEUR 
PHOTOGRAPHERS 



A 4x5 SERIES 1 KORONA CAMERA 

LISTED AT $12, FOR 8 YEARLY SUBSCRIPTIONS TO RECREATION; 

A 5x7 SERIES 1 KORONA CAMERA 

LISTED AT $16, FOR 12 YEARLY SUBSCRIPTIONS; 

A 4x5 SERIES 2 KORONA CAMERA 

LISTED AT $18, FOR 14 YEARLY SUBSCRIPTIONS; 

A 4x5 SERIES 3 KORONA CAMERA 

LISTED AT $22, FOR 18 YEARLY SUBSCRIPTIONS; 

A 4x5 SERIES 4 KORONA CAMERA 

LISTED AT $25, FOR 20 YEARLY SUBSCRIPTIONS; 

A 4x5 SERIES 5 KORONA CAMERA 

LISTED AT $35, FOR 30 YEARLY SUBSCRIPTIONS. 

SAMPLE COPIES, FOR USE IN CANVASSING, 
FURNISHED FREE. 

ADDRESS 

RECREATION 

23 WEST 24TH STREET, NEW YORK CITY 



RECREATION. xxxiii 




Pabst 

brews beer to suit tne 
popular taste ;someiignt 
ana some dark, out all 
absolutely pure. It's) 
not an experiment, but 
an assured ract-, and 
thus tne widespread 
opularity or 

cLDSt Blue Ribton 

is explained. 




XXXIV 



RECREATION. 



'?r. "« 



I> 



»H 



A Delicious " SmacK " 

follows every taste of 

ALPHA 

New England 

Salad Cream 

the ideal Salad Dressing and Table Sauce. Perfects any 
dish. CONTAINS NO OIL, but if desired you 
can add your favorite brand of oil. 

Try ALPHA on salads, fish, baked beans, cold meats, 
cucumbers, sliced tomatoes, lettuce, etc. ALPHA is the 
most welcome condiment ever placed on your table. Health- 
ful. Preferred to catsup. Suits everybody, Creates appetite. 
Aids digestion. Every bottle guaranteed absolutely pure. 
NEVER, NEVER SPOILS. Your money 
back if you don't like it. AT ALL GROCERS. 

Martha Taft Wentworth Recipe Book (60 
Recipes and Suggestions) sent free for grocer s name. 
THE H. J. BLODGETT CO. (Inc.) 67 Thayer St., Boston, Mass. 

Also Manufacturers of WONDERLAND PUDDING TABLETS 

One tablet makes a quart of milk into a milk jelly more dflicioM, re- 
freshing and nourishing than other desserts. ALSO MAKh DELIC- 
IOUS ICE CREAM. Package of 10 Tablets by mail 10c. No samples. 



The Best Yet:— To any person sending 
me $2, express or money order, for one 
year's subscription to Recreation, I will 
give free, one fine 3 joint bamboo rod, 7 to 
9 feet long, one nickel plated 60 yard 
multiplying reel, and 50 yards of water- 
proof silk line. This outfit, including 
Recreation, would cost $6. Or I will 
give the above outfit for 7 yearly sub- 
scriptions to Recreation. Or I will give 
the 50 yards of silk line, listed at $1, for 
one subscription and 25 cents extra. This 
line is a very fine outfit and would retail 
in any store at $1. 
C. W. Jacobs, 339 N. 2nd St., Coshocton, O. 



Here is Another! 

If you will send me 

30 Yearly Subscriptions 

RECREATION 

I will send you 

A No* 10 GoerzTrieder- 
Binocular Field Glass 

Listed at $38-00 

Every well-informed man knows the great 
power of this modern prismatic field glass. 
It is indispensable to every hunter, and is 
one of the latest and best on the market. 

I have but a few of these instruments on 
hand and the offer will be withdrawn as 
soon as the supply is exhausted. There- 
fore, if you want one 

START IMMEDIATELY. 

Sample copies of Recreation for use in canvassing 
furnished on application. 



Briggs — Do you consider Mercer a good 
French scholar? 

Griggs — Fair. He understands the lan- 
guage sufficiently well not to attempt to 
speak it. — Boston Transcript. 



"See here, you chump, I placed an ad 
in your paper, showing the public how to 
get rich quickly, and you place underneath 
it another ad on 'how to cure the dope 
habit.' " — Brooklvn Eagle. 



The 
Hawkeye 





keeps contents 
cool and sweet throughout the 
warmest Summer day. Light, 
compact and durable. Your 
money back if not pleased after 
ten days' trial. 

Wo. 1, size 18x10x8 inches 
deep, . . price, $3.25 

Ho. 2. size 20x13x10 inches 
deep, . . price, $3.50 

Ask your dealer for it, or 
will send C. O. D. subject to 
inspection. Write to-day for 
booklet giving full description. 



T IDEAL FOR. ALL OUTINGS 
Lined with zinc, hair, felt and asbestos. Air- 
tight and dust-proof. A small quantity of ice 
deliclously 




BURLINGTON BASKET WORKS, 17 MaJi\ St., BURLINGTON. IOWA 



RECREATION. 



xxxv 




iA Most Delicious 



Sh redded Wh ole 
Wheat Biscuit is 
made in the most hygienic and scientific 
food laboratory in the world. The wheat is 
spun into light shreds, containing thousands 
of open pores and is not crushed flat and dense 
as in case of other foods. These pores absorb the di 
gestive juices and provide far greater surface for 
their action than is given by any other food. 

The following simple "course before coffee" is much in vogue with 
club men everywhere. The simplicity of preparation and the little cost, 
together, with the delicious taste of the compotes, make this dessert in 
rare favor in the home. 

Use Seasonable Fruit and 

SHREDDED 



WS45iAT 
BISCUIT 




Split and slightly toast the Biscuit, then 
serve with berries, sliced peaches, bananas 
or any seasonable fruit. Simple, isn't it. 
Your verdict will be 

"Simply Delicious." 

FOR SHORTCAKE— With sharp knife halve the Shredded Whole Wheat Biscuit lengthwise, 
= prepare pineapple as for sauce (or bananas or mixed fruit) and set aside. When serving arrange 
== halves in layers covered with fruit and add sugar and whipped cream. 

Shredded Whole Wheat Biscuit is Sold by AH Grocers. 

Send for "The Vital Question " (Recipes, illustrated in colors) FREE. Address 

&he NATURAL FOOD CO., Niagara Falls, N. Y. 



Free — To each person sending me $i 
(post-office money order) for one year's 
subscription to Recreation, I will send 
choice of a Braided Leather Dog Whip, 
with a steel snap on end, on a Polished 
Steel Dog Chain, with swivels, snaps, etc., 
or one dozen assorted Trout Flies, silk 
bodies, good ones, or a Pocket Compass, one 
inch dial, open face, watch shape, with ring 
handle and bevel crystal. Also a special 
offer limited to the months of June, July, 
August and September of a nickel plated 
multiplying 40 yard raised pillar reel, bal- 
ance handle with click, drag and free run- 
ning for two subscriptions. For four sub- 
scriptions a genuine 6 strip Split Bamboo 
or Fly Rod, 4 pieces with grips, silk whip- 
ped, nickel plated mountings, solid metal 
reel seat, length about 9^ feet. 

Edward S. Adams, 
Box 536, Manchester, N. H. 



Am a regular reader of Recreation and 
it is absolutely the best sportsman's period- 
ical I ever had the privilege of reading. 
Having been brought up in nature's best 
school, the farm, and being now engaged in 
inside work, Recreation is like a wave of 
clover-scented air to my tired brain. Your 
March number is fine. I have reread it, 
■advertisements included, no less than 4 
times. 

L. J, Tooley, Kalamazoo, Mich. 



AS AN AID TO DIGESTION 

No seasoning can compare with 
McILHENNY'S 

iJcUhzaco Sauce 

It is purer and more healthful than ground pepper, 
and leaves no lumps or sediment. 




gives a delicious and spicy flavor to 

SOUPS, SALADS, OYSTERS, CLAMS. FISH. 

LOBSTERS, CHOPS, R.OASTS, 

SAUCES, GRAVIES, Etc. 

Be sure to ask your dealer for McIlhenny's 

<Sa6oAco Sauce) 

the original and best. Once used, Tabasco Sauce 
becomes a household necessity. 

FRPF ^ e w *^ gladly send, upon request, an interest- 
* *>■*-•*-• ing booklet with many new and unique recipes. 

Address 

McILHENNY'S TABASCO, NEW IBERIA, LA. 



XXXVI 



RECREATION. 



SOME RARE OPPORTUNITIES 

These goods are all new, and will be shipped 
direct from factory. Prices named are those at 
which manufacturers and dealers usually sell. 
Here is a good chance to get 



FREE OF 
COST 



A Book, a Gun, a Camera } 

A Sleeping Bag, a Fishing Rod > 
A Reel, a Tent, ) 

Subscriptions need not all be sent at once. They 
may be sent in installments as taken and credit will 
be given on account. "When the required number 
is obtained the premium earned will be shipped. 

These Offers are subject to change 
without notice. 

TO ANY PERSON SENDING ME 

TWO yearly subscriptions to Recreation 
at $i each, I will send a copy of Hunt- 
ing in the Great West, cloth ; or a Zar 
Camera, listed at $i; or an Ingersoll Watch 
or Cyclometer, listed at $i; or a Recreation 
Waterproof Match Box, made by W. L. 
Marble and listed at $i; or a Shakespeare 
Revolution Bait listed at 75 cents; or a 
Laughlin Fountain Pen ; or a dozen Trout 
Flies, assorted, listed at $1 ; or a pair of At- 
tachable Eyeglass Temples, gold-plated, 
made by Gall & Lembke; or one Rifle Wick 
Plug, made by Hemm & Woodward, Sidney, 
Ohio, 30 caliber to 50 caliber, or Shotgun 
Wick Plug, 20 gauge up to 10 gauge. 

THREE subscriptions at $1 each, a safety 
pocket ax, made by W. L. Marble a,nd 
listed at $2.50; or a dozen Bass Flies, 
assorted, listed at $2 ; or a pair of chrome 
tanned horsehide hunting and driving gloves, 
listed at $1.50, made by J. P. Luther Glove 
Co. ; or a pair of Shotgun Wick Plugs made 
by Hemm & Woodward, Sidney, Ohio, 20 
gauge to 10 gauge. 

FOUR subscriptions at $1 each, an Ideal Hunt- 
ing Knife, made by W. L. Marble and 
listed at $2.50; or a .32 caliber Automatic 
Forehand Revolver, made by the Hopkins 
& Allen Arms Co. ; or a No. 822 Rifle 
made by the Hopkins & Allen Arms Co., 
listed at $4-5o. 

FIVE subscriptions at $1 each, a copy of Cruis- 
ings in the Cascades, cloth; or a set of Neh- 
ring's Convertible Ampliscopes, listed at 
$5.00; or an Ideal Hunting Knife made by 
W. L. Marble, and listed at $3 ; or a polished 
Buffalo Horn Gun Rack, made by E. W. Stiles ; 
or a Forehand Gun, made by the Hopkins & 
Allen Arms Co., listed at $6; or a pair of lock 
lever skates, made by Barney & Berry, 
listed at $4,50; or a pair of gauntlets, for 
hunting and driving, ladies' size, listed at 
$2.50, made by J. P. Luther Glove Co., or a 
J C Hand trap made by the Mitchell Mfg. 
Co., listed at $4. 

SIX subscriptions at $1 each, a Hawkey e Re- 
frigerating Basket made by the Burlington 
Basket Co., or one dozen Eureka golf balls 
listed at $4; or a Forehand Gun made by 
the Hopkins & Allen Arms Co., listed at $9. ; 
or a Pocket Poco B 3X X 4-X' made by the 
Rochester Optical & Camera Co. listed at $9. 

SEVEN subscriptions at $1 each, a copy of 
The Big Game of North A merica, or of The 
A merican Book of the Dog, cloth, or one set 
Lakewood golf clubs, 5 in number, listing at $5 ; 

or a aeries 1 iB or 1 iD Koroaa Camera, made 



by the Gundlach Optical Co., listed at $10. 

EIGHT subscriptions at $1 each, a 4 x 5 
Weno Hawk-Eye Camera, made by the 
Blair Camera Co., and listed at $8.; or a 
series I, 4x5, Korona Camera, made by the 
Gundlach Optical Co., listed at$i2. ; or a 
pair of horsehide Hunting shoes, made by T. 
H. Guthrie, Newark, N. J., and listed at $8. 

NINE subscriptions at $1 each, an Acme 
single shot gun, made by the Davenport 
Arms Co., and listed at $8. 

TEN subscriptions at $1 each, a Cut- 
Glass Salad Bowl, made by Higgins & 
Seiter, and listed at $4.50; or a V iwman 
& Erbe Automatic Reel, listed at $b to $9 ; 
or a Bristol Steel Fishing Rod, listedat $6, 
or less; or a Waterproof Wall Tent 7x7, 
made by Abercrombie & Fitch, and listed 
at $8. ; or a pair of horsehide Hunting Boots, 
made by T. H. Guthrie, Newark, N, J., and 
listed at $10 ; or a Rough Rider rifle telescope, 
made by The Malcolm Rifle Sight Mfg. Co , 
and listed at $12. 

TWELVE subscriptions at $1 each, a Peabody 
Carbine valued at $12 ; or a Davenport Eject- 
or Gun, listed at $10., or a Cycle Poco N0.3, 
4x5, made by the Rochester Optical and 
Camera Co., listedat $15. 

FIFTEEN subscriptions at $1 each, a Shakes- 
peare Reel, Silver Plated, listed at $15; or a 
set of rabbit plates made by Higgins & Seiter, 
and listed at $8, or a Field Glass made by 
Gall & Lembke; jor a Kenwood Sleeping Bag, 
complete, with canvas cover, listed at $16; 
or a Bulls-Eye rifle telescope, made by The 
Malcolm Rifle Sight Mfg. Co., and listed at $16. 

TWENTY subscriptions at $1 each, a 14-karat 
Gold Hunting-case Watch, with Waltham 
Movement, listed at $20; or an Elita single 
shot gun, made by the Davenport Arms Co., 
andlisted at $18., or an Acme Folding Canvas 
Boat, No. 1, Grade, A listed at $27;or aMul- 
lins Duck Boat, listed at $20 ; or a Shattuck 
double hammerless shot gun listed at $25 ; or a 
Pneumatic Camp Mattress, with pillow listed 
at $20. 

TWENTY-FIVE subscriptions at $1 each, 
an 1 1 -foot King Folding Canvas Boat, listed 
at $38; or a 4x5 Planatic lens, made by the 
Rochester Lens Co., and listed at $25; or a 
Syracuse Grade 00, double hammerless Gun, 
made by the Syracuse Arms Co., and listed 
at $30. 

THIRTYsubscriptionsat$i each, aWaterproof 
Tent, 14^ x 17, made by Abercrombie & 
Fitch, and listed at $25 ;or an Ithaca, quality 
No. 1, plain, double barrel, hammerless 
breech loading shot gun, listed at $40. ; or a 
Field Glass, made by C. P. Goerz. 

THIRTY-FIVE subscriptions at $1 each, a 14- 
foot King Folding Canvas boat, listed at $48. 

FORTY subscriptions at $1 each,, a Savage 
.303 Repeating Rifle ; or a No. 10 Gun Cab- 
inet, made by the West End Furniture Co., 
and listed at $32. 

FORTY- FIVE subscriptions at $1 each, a Royal 
Anastigmat Lens, 4x5, series I, made by 
Rochester Lens Co., and listed at $45. 

FIFTY subscriptions at $1 each, a No. 20 
Gun Cabinet, made by the West End 
Furniture Co.. and listed at $38r ?* 

TWO HUNDRED subscriptions at $1 each, a 
strictly first class upright piano, listed at $750. 

A*i re58l Recreation &^ e Yo t ck 4th st ' 



RECREATION. 



XXXVll 




AUTOMOBIUNG 

There is no more exhilarating sport or 
recreation than autpmobiling. The pleas- 
ure of a spin over country roads or through 
city park is greatly enhanced if the 
basket is well stocked with 

©ewar's Scotcb 

"Mbite Xabel" 

the popular brand both in this and the 
old country. "There is no Scotch like 
Dewar's," is a proverb among con- 
noisseurs. 



AN AUTOMOBILING POSTER. 

" Automobiling " (copyright 1903, by Fred- 
erick Glassup) is an original drawing by E. N. 
Blue, shown herewith. Printed in four colors 
on heavy plate paper, without advertisement, 
and sent to any address on receipt of 10 cents in 
silver. Suitable for framing in club-house or 
home. Next month, a delightful camp scene by 
the famous artist, Dan Smith. 

FREDERICK GLASSUP 

Sole Agent for John Deivar & Sons, Ltd. 

126 Bleecker Street, New York 



WANT A REEL? 

You can get one for nothing. 

Of at least for a few hours' work. 

Send me 

15 Yearly Subscriptions 

to 




and I will send you 

A TALBOT REEI. 

Listed at $20. 
made by W. H. Tklbot, Nevada, flo 

This is one of the finest pieces of fishing 
tackle ever made. It is built like a gold; 
watch. Equal to any Kentucky reel you \ 
ever saw. 

la Tournaments, Always a Victor 
Among the Angler's Treasures, Always the Chief 

I have but a few of these reels in stnck, ; 
and this offer will be withdrawn as soon asj 
the present supply is exhausted. 

Sample copies of Recreation for use in canvassing 
furni-hed on application, 




la 



U NDER WO O D ' S O R I GINAL 

The pure and delicate Deviled Ham which has been on the marketfor 
years. Sugar-cured ham and fine, pure spices is all that we use. 
It is delicious for sandwiches, at lunch, picnic, or tea, and in the 
chafing-dish. It may be bought at any good grocers, but be sure you 
see on the can THE LITTLE RED DEVIL. There is only ONE 
Deviled Ham — IJriderwood's Red iPevil Brand, All 
Others are imitations, butimitations in name onlv, as the goods com- 
monly labeled and sold as potted or deviled ham, made as they are 
from the odds and ends of the packing house, are no more like 
Underwood's Original Ham than chalk is like cheese. 
Our Book contains a lot of unique and practical receipts. We will 
send it FREE. WM. UNDERWOOD CO., Boston, Mass., U. S. A. 



m 



Xxxvm 



RECREATION. 



DIAMONDS 

ON CREDIT 





OUR 
NEW 

SPECIAL 
SUMMER 
CATALOGUE 

EVERY person interested in Diamonds will want a 
copy of our NEW SUMHER CATALOGUE, for 
it shows the latest creations in artistic Diamond 
mountings, fine jewelry and watches. These new and fine 
goods you will not find illustrated in the catalogues of 
other houses until next fall, for we are the only house in 
the Diamond and Jewelry business which issues a com- 
plete catalogue between seasons. Everything illustrated 
is quoted at exceptionally low prices and sold on the 
POPULAR LOFTIS SYSTEH , of easy payments. 
Select any article that you like and it will be delivered at 
your door with all express charges pjiid. Only one-fifth 
of the price need be paid at first : the balance being 
arranged in a series of small monthly payments extend- 
ing over eight months. No security is required ; no in- 
terest is charged and no publicity is created when you 
buy on our CONFIDENTIAL CHARGE ACCOUNT 
SYSTEM. If you make a selection, it will be upon the 
distinct understanding that your money 
will be promptly returned in case you de- 
cide not to purchase. We are the largest 
concern in the business and sell only the 
finest genuine goods, and at prices rang- 
ing from ten to twenty per cent 
below those of other houses. Every 
Diamond is sold under a written 
guarantee of quality and value and 
may be exchanged at any time in 
the future for other goods or a 
larger stone at the full original 
price. Our Confidential Credit Sys- 
tem is open to all honest persons 
without regard to their financial 
worth; but if you prefer to buy for 
cash we make the most startling 
and liberal offer ever made. It is 
no less than guaranteeing the return 
of all money paid at any time within 
one year — less ten per cent, the rea- 
sonable cost of doing business. We 
are one of the oldest houses in the 
trade (Est. 1858). We refer to any 
bank in America — for instance, ask 
your local banker to consult his 
Dun orBradstreet book of commer- 
cial ratings and he will tell you that 
we stand at the top in credit, relia- 
, bility and promptness. We have a 
number of attractive booklets that 
i we will be glad to send you if you 
[write promptly for our New Sum=» 
'mer Catalogue. 

LOFTIS BROS. <& CO. 

Diamond Importers and 
Manufacturing Jewelers 




Dept. G-82 92 to 98 State St. fllTf A (1(\ TT T 

Opposite Marshall Field & Co. \jXll\jJ±\J\Jf 11*1** 



Sent on Approval 

TO RESPONSIBLE PEOPLE 

Laughlin 

Fountain Pen 



Guaranteed Finest 

Grade 14k. 
50LID GOLD PEN. 

To test the merits of 



RECREATION ■■ 



as an advertising medium 
we make this grand spe- 
cial offer, your choice of 




These 
Two 
Popular 
Styles 
For Only 



i 



1 




Postpaid 
to any 
Address 



(By Registered mail 8 cents extra) 

Holder is made of finest 
quality hard rubber, in four 
simple parts, fitted with 
very highest grade, large 
size 14k, geld pen, any flex- 
ibility desired— in feeding 
device perfect. 

Either Style— RICHLY 
GOLD flOUNTED for pre- 
sentation purposes, $1.00 
extra. 

Grand Special 
Offer 

You may try the pen a 
week ; if you do not find it 
as represented, fully as 
fine a value as you can 
secure for three times the 
price in any other makes, 
if not satisfactory in every 
respect, return it and we 
will promptly refund your 
money. 

Illustration on left is full 
size of Ladies' style; on 
right, Gentlemen's style. 
Lay this RECREATION Down 
and Write NOW. 

Safety Pocket Pen Hold- 
er sent free of charge with 
each Pen. 

address ; 



Laughlin Hfo;. Co. 

424 Griswold St., DETROIT. MICH. 



RECREATION. 



XXXIX 



ILLUSTRATING is a Money-Making 

profession. We teach you by mail to become 
an Illustrator, Ad. -Writer, Journalist, 
Proofreader, Bookkeeper, Stenograph- 
er, Electrician, Electrical Engineer,etc. 
Write for Free illustrated book, "Struggles 
With the World," and mention the subject 
which interests you. Correspondence Insti- 
tute of America, Box70i,SCRANTON, PA. 





Trade Mark Registered. 



The Puritan Fountain Pen Filler 

Fills the pen -with ink and the 
•world with joy. 

Push the pen barrel on arm of 
filler and withdraw, and your pen 
is rilled. No staining or bubbling. 
Desk form 25 cents. Pocket form 
20 cents. Order of your dealer or 
by mail Give inside diameter of 
pen barrel. 

Beekman Novelty Co., 

317 Broadway, New York City 



I have become much interested in the 
discussion in Recreation concerning the 
merits and demerits of the Marlin rifle and 
Peters' cartridges. The altercation brings 
to my mind an incident and suggests a few 
thoughts. 

In October, '99, with 2 friends, I was 
hunting deer on Howe brook, about 6 
miles East of St. Croix lake, Aroostook 
county, Maine. I carried a 38-55 Winchester, 
one companion had a 30-30 Winchester 
and the other a 30-30 Marlin. One even- 
ing the owner of the Marlin came into 
camp in a rage. He had jumped a small 
band of deer and fired one shot without 
apparent effect. The deer circled and came 
to a stop in plain view, with a big buck 
affording a fine shot. Did my friend shoot 
him? No, he did not. Why? He was 
frantically trying to extricate a jammed 
cartridge from the breech of his rifle. The 
deer joyously bade him good-bye, with a 
wave of their flags. After sitting down 
on a log and fussing with the gun for half 
an hour, my friend made a short cut for 
camp. On the way he had another good 
shot at a deer which he could not take, 
and on entering camp he would have 
smashed the Marlin rifle to pieces if I 
had not taken it from him. 

I have nothing to say about the Peters' 
cartridges, for I never used any; but it 
strikes me as foolish for any firm to with- 
draw its patronage from a journal because 
of adverse comments on their goods by 
correspondents. 

A thought suggested by the controversy 
is that since Recreation, its editor and its 
patrons advocate the protection of game, 
they might favor, as the best means to that 
end, the use of Marlin rifles and Peters' 
ammunition. What could better promote 
the protection of game than hunting with 
rifles and ammunition that will not work? 
You might even carry the idea farther 
by buying and presenting this combination 
to the game hogs as fast as you obtain 
their names and addresses. 

W, H. Sanborn. St Catherines. Ont. 



A YEAR'S 
5UPPIY0P/ 

CIGARS FREE 



T<~ 



You may 
have noticed the 
above announcement 
before with disbelief. We 
have overcome the skepticism 
which assails any rad'cal depart- 
ure from established trade customs. 
We offer you two years' smoking 
for the price of one ; twice as many or 
twice as good cigars for the same money; 
or the same number for half the money; 
your favorite cigar or a better one for one-half 
what you pay over the counter — A STRAIGHT 
60 PER CENT. SAYING FOR YOU, any way 
you figure it. 

All made possible since we "BURNED OUR 
BRIDGES BEHIND US" by cutting loose from the 
wholesalers, who had taken our product for years, and 
going straight over the head of Jobber, Salesman, Re- 
tailer and all — direct to you, with the same established, 
time-tested brands; selling them to you by the box, at 
actual Jobber's Factory prices. 

Our proposition rests upon our ability to please you and 

thousands like you, even to the extent of building cigars 

especially for you, if we cannot please you from our stock. 

We have done this for many years with the jobber, sales- 

' man and retailer between us; why not all the more so now, 

dealing direct, especially when 

Saving You One-Half 

YOUR SMOKING EXPENSE? 

No risk to you. 
Everything we say — proven to you and confirmed by you or 

YOUR MONEY BACK 

No expense to confirm our statements or your judgment, is 
there any reason tor not saving yourself half your smoking ex- 
pense and having your taste pleased every time? Why give it 
to the long succession of "in between" men unless that is your 
pet charity? 

In order to get the benefit of BUYING DIRECT as soon 

as possible, send for our booklet "Rolled Reveries," which 

explains everything, or to hasten matters — we will at first 

send you assortments from which to make selections. For 

$1.00 an assortment of 25 cigars showing 15 ten cent and 

10 five cent values; for 60 Cents 12 ten cent and two-for» 

a-quarter values ;for 35 Cents, twelve high-grade fives ; for 

$1.25 25 assorted ten cent cigars. Each separately 

wrapped and described, showing you how two-f or- a- 

quarter and ten cent cigars can be bought in boxes 

t 25 and 50 foi from four to six cents each, others 

Tom two to three cents each. All Transportation 

Charges Prepaid. 

Dayton. Ohio, 
" If you will send about a dozen of your tria/ 
order blanks, 1 will try and get some more 
people. The cigars are fine." 

Name supplied on request. 

OHN B. ROGERS & CO. 
"The Pioneers" 
92 Jarvis Street 
Binghamton 



N.Y. 



fCHorr company. 



xl 



RECREATION. 



SQUIRES' SIBERIAN MOOSE 
HUNTING BOOTS & SHOES 

Made only by HENRY C. SQUIRES «. SON 
20 Cortlandt St., New York 
The leather is waterproof, fine grained, 
tough and pliable. The 
linings are russet calf- 
skin. The soles are 
best waterproof anhy- 
drous oak leather, 
stitching of silk, Eng- 
lish back stays, bulldog- 
toes, extra heavy eye- 
lets, Pratt fasteners 
and hand made 
throughout. Price 
$7.50 net. Short Boots 
$8.50, Knee Boots 
$10, Cavalry Style 
Boots $12. 
Special circular 
giving detailed 
information 
free for the 
asking. 




Mention Recreation. 



For Sale : Bardon Rifle Range Tele- 
scope, power 33, in first class condition. 
Price $12. F. F. Brush, Washington Boro., 
Pa. 



Another Good Offer ; To the first person 
sending me five subscriptions to Recrea- 
tion and five dollars, before April 1st, I 
will give a 2 by 3^ printing press, and 
type to go with it. To any person send- 
ing me two subscriptions and two dollars 
I will give a silver-plated napkin ring. To 
any person sending one subscription, I will 
give a sterling silver ring. All persons 
sending me one subscription, please send 
finger measurement. A. J. Brodhead, 

42 Sayre St., Elizabeth, N. J. 



A Hunting Knife Free. To any person 
sending me three yearly subscriptions to 
Recreation and $3, I will send a pocket 
hunting knife with handle 5^ inches long 
and blade 5 inches long. Fine steel, excel- 
lent workmanship. Your name and address 
and your L.A.S. number if desired inserted 
on a plate in the handle. 

Geo. W. Mains, McKeesport, Pa, 



Do You Want a Drinking Cup Free - 

Send me $1 for a new subscription to Rec- 
reation and I will send you a fine nickel- 
plated folding drinking cup. For to cents 
extra will send by registered mail. Mrs. 
Thomas H. Walker, 295 Merrimac Street, 
Manchester, N. H. 



Mexican Opals Free: To any one sub- 
scribing to Recreation through me, I will 
send a beautiful genuine Mexican Opal, 
large as a cean. 
A. Thompson, Box 332, San Antonio, Tex. 



For Sale or Exchange : Practically 
new Trunk Shape Gun Case. Cost $27, 
very fine. Roy L. Schroder, Van Home, 
Iowa. 




flusical Clock 



A skilled mechanic 
has invented lately a 
which, besides keeping perlect time, running 8 days 
with one winding, striking the hours and halves, will 
also play favorite airs every half hour. As the cost 
is very low, many prefer buying the clock with the mu- 
sical attachment. Ask your jeweler for it or send to 
E. L. CUENDET, Mfr., 7 Barclay Street, New York 



RELICS OF A DISAPPEARING RACE 



Buffalo Skulls 

s^ WITH POLISHED OR 
UNPOLISHED HORNS 

Also polished or unpolished horns in pairs or single. 
Polished horns tipped with incandescent < lectric lights ; 
polished hunting horns ; mirrors hung in poJished horns, 
etc. These are decided novelties and are in great de- 
mand for sportsmen's dens, offices, club-rooms, halls, 
etc. Send for illustrated catalog. Mention Recrea- 
tion. 

E. W. STILES 
I41 Washington St. Hartford, Conn. 




RECREATION. 



xli 



We have not much to protect in Massa- 
chusetts except our game birds and fishes, 
but we bid fair to have. The increase in 
the number of deer in this section is re- 
markable. They are seen in all the sur- 
rounding country repeatedly, in bunches of 
2 to 5 ; and our well nigh assured re- 
enactment of the 5 years' close season law 
extends for another period the inestimable 
benefit of their protection. Our legislative 
hearing on the bill to prohibit for an in- 
definite period the sale of grouse and 
woodcock developed no opposition what- 
ever, and we look to its passage by house 
and senate as almost a certainty. 

Too much credit can not be given Hon. 
Herman S. Fay, of Marlboro, chief warden 
of the L. A. S. of Massachusetts, who 
has had charge of the bill. His energetic, 
careful and tactful direction of the inter- 
ests in his charge has been an immense aid 
in the important work accomplished ; and 
the sportsmen of this State should be great- 
ly indebted to him and his co-workers. 

The L. A. S. is the only national organi- 
zation of sportsmen that has lived and ac- 
complished things in the field of game and 
fish protection. 

More power to your elbow ! 

Ernest Russell, Worcester, Mass. 



Free: To any person sending me $i for 
a year's subscription to Recreation I will 
give free a Fountain Pen with filler or a 
Webster's Dictionary, indexed. C. C. Tal- 
bot, 30 Union Street, Putnam,- Conn. 




Stallman's 
Dresser 



Have you seen one? It is 

up-to-date. Think of it, 

everything within reach. No 

heavy trays, but light, smooth 

drawers. Holds as much and costs 

no more than a good box trunk. 

rwn 1 Hand riveted, almost indestructible. 

I 1*1 llll? Once tried, always recommended. 

* *■ ****** gent C. O. I)., privilege examinati^x. 

•c. stamp for catalogue. Mention Recreation. 

F. A, STALLMAN. 
*7 JW. ^©riruf St.. Columbus, O. 




SIGHT RESTORED 

Quickly and at little expense in 
patients' own home. 

The testimony of many people who have been so won- 
derfully benefited by the Oneal Dissolvent Method is 
ample evidence of the merit which it possesses. It has 
hot been ifi some isolated instances where a permanent 
cure has been effected, but in every case where the 
treatment was given a fair trial. .With all of its mar- 
velous power it is absolutely harmless, and it is for this 
reason that Dr. Oneal permits the majority of his pa- 
tients to treat themselves in their own homes, which is 
not only convenient, but much less expensive than if 
they were obliged to come to him. Thousands are 
being cured in this way every year. Mrs. Aurelia P. 
Rifle, 78 Niagara St., Buffalo,N. Y., cataracts; Mrs. C. H. 
Sweetland, Hamburg, Iowa, paresis of optic nerve; 
both cured themselves at home, restoring their sight 
completely in a few months' time, by applying this 
treatment under Dr. Oneal's direction. 

Dr. Oneal has just issued the twenty-third edition of 
his book, "Eye Diseases Cured without Surgery," 
which tells how you can cure yourself at home. It ac- 
curately describes and illustrates all forms of eye dis- 
eases, and will be of valuable assistance to those who 
are afflicted. It is sent free to anyone who writes for it 
Cross-eyes straightened by a New Method — always sue-' 
cessful. Address OREN ONEAL, M.D., Suite 839, 
52 Dearborn St., Chicago. 

REVELL & CO. 

CHICAGO 




FURNITURE 
OFFICE DESKS 



THE LARGEST DISPLAY 
THE LOWEST PRICES 

ALEXANDER H: REVELL & CO. 

Wabash Ave- and Adams St , CHICAGO, ILL. 



xlii 



RECREATION. 



PAROID 
ROOFINQ 



"It Lasts 



»» 



TJIGHLY recommended by sports- 
*■ men for covering camps and 
other buildings where a good, eco- 
nomical roofing is desired. Easy to 
apply, with roofing kit inside each 
roll. 

Send for Samples 
Mention Recreation. 



F. W. BIRD & SON 

MAKERS 

CHICAGO NEW YORK 

EAST WALPOLE, HASS. « 



The Buffalo Is Well Nigh Extinct 

And every nature lover wants a relic 
of him. Here is a chance to get it : 
I have in stock a limited number of 
buffalo horns, highly polished and 
fitted with nickel plated flanges at 
the base, so that they can be 
screwed on the wall, thus forming 

A Novel and 
Effective Gun Rack 

So long as the supply lasts I will 
give a pair of these horns for 

3 Yearly Subscriptions to RECREATION 

Sample copies for use in canvassing 
furnished on request. Address 

Recreation, 23 W. 24th St., New York 




The "Victor" 



is the real talking machine; 

its sound is natural. Band 
playing, monologues, comic or religious songs, all are reproduced 
as clear as if the artist was present. When ordering, get the 
latest styles — we charge no more than others who offer you old 
styles. Get our full catalogue FREE. ° 

E. L. Cuendet, 7 Barclay St., New York 



The Reason the LUTHER HAND-MADE OLOVE will not rip 





Machine sewing cuts itself 



Hand sewing cannot. 



A Practical HuntiD ? and 

— Driving Glove 

Made for practical, comfortable, durability. No Oil. No 
Odor. No Animal Glue. Practically seamless. Cannot 
Rip. Unaffected by moisture of any kind. If soiled, may 
be washed with soap and hot water, without injury. The 
Luther Fastener is adjustable, fits any wrist and cannot get out of order 
Illustrated booklet, samples and self measurement rule on application. 
If you prefer u , 308 Driving Glove postpaid anywhere $1.50, made to measure $2 
to buy through jj 320 Gauntlet, lt ' 2.50, " " 3 

your dealer ' 

se^dushi. j p LUTHER GLOVE CO., 536 Pe»n st. f Berim, wis. 




RECREATION. 



xliii 



Small game is scarce here. A few squir- 
rels, an occasional rabbit, and now and 
then a quail, constitute the whole list. 
Everybody hunts quails, and many are 
killed in close season. 

Last Christmas a friend and I arranged 
for a turkey hunt at a point 15 miles from 
here, where my friend had been told a few 
might be found. We reached our destina- 
tion at nightfall, went early to bed, and 
woke to find the ground covered with 
freshly fallen snow. 

By daylight we were in the woods, where 
I soon struck the track of a big gobbler 
hot and fresh. My friend presently joined 
me, and for Y\ of a mile we followed, 
trailing him at last to cover in a windfall. 
When he broke, my friend knocked a 
feather bed out of him with No. 6 shot, and 
I sent 3 invitations after him with my 38 
Winchester, but we didn't get him. 

Rabbits made up our bags, I 4, my 
friend 6. 

Charles Goss, Paoli, Ind. 



The Best Offer Yet.— To any person who 
will subscribe to Recreation for one year 
through me I will send free a small water 
color landscape, hand painted, suitable for 
framing ; or a hand painted silk bookmark. 
For two subscriptions I will send a fine 
Mexican opal scarf pin worth ordinarily 
from $1 to $1.50. 

Don M. Harris, 308 Crawford Road, 

Cleveland, Ohio. 




The Celebrated 

THOMPSON- 
QUIMBY 

Hunting 
Boots, 
Shoes and 
Mocca- 



have 
on file 
m e a s - 
urements 
of all who 
bought 
Boots and 
Shoes of the 
W.Fred Quimby 
Co., of New York 
for the past 20 
years, and I make 
the same grade of 
sportsmen's foot- 
wear as they made. 
I was s u p e r i n- 
tendent of the 
shoe department 
of that firm and bought the 
right to make these boots and 
shoes. Get a pair now. They 
will last years and are the cheap 
est in the end. I refer by permis 
sion to the Editor of Recreation 
Measurement blanks and prices 

I application. Mention Recreation 
T. H. GUTHRIE 
3$ William Street, HEWARK 









Because of their construction I 

President 
Suspenders 

give most 
Comfort & Service 
Guaranteed 
"All breaks made good" 
"President" on buckle means 
"Cannot rust" 50c. and $1.00 
Any shop or by mail prepaid 
The C. A. Edgarton Mfg. Co. 
80x219=1* Shirley Mass 
Send 6c. for Catalogue 



Journalism : Story=Writing 

taught by mail. MSS. sold on 
Commission; criticised, revised 
and prepared for publication. 
Send for free booklet. "Writing 
for Profit;" tells how to suc- 
ceed as a writer, Thornton West, 
Editor-in-Chief; founded 1895. 

THE NATIONAL. PRESS ASSOCIATION, 

The Baldwin, No. 109 - - - Indianapolis, Ind. 





To a aver- 
Users 



A DOLLAR RATE BOOK FREE 

We will send postpaid, entirely without charge, to any business 
house that is interested in the subject of advertising, a copy of a 
bound volume we have recently issued entitled "Current Rates of 
Live Publications," giving list of leading towns throughout U. S., 
populations, principal papers, circulations and publishers' rates for 
advertising space on small and large contracts. Regular price of 
this volume is $1 — We will send free upon receipt of ten cents in 
stamps to cover postage, 

FULFORD, PAINTER & TOREY, Inc., Advertising Agents 
N. W. Cor. Wabash Ave. and Randolph St. CH1CACO, ILL. 




^ WEBBER'S 

JERSEY COAT 

Costs no more than old-fashioned blouse to pull 
over the head. Designed for trap shooting in 
hot weather, but suitable for any purpose. 
Good thing for fishing, chicken shooting or office 
coat. Very light weight but strong and made 
to fit. Ask your dealer for it. If he does not 
have them, send me your size and price, $2, 
and I will send you one to fit, charges prepaid. 

GEORGE F. WEBBER, HFR. 

Station A, Detroit, filch. 



xliv 



RECREATION. 



Spratts Paten 





Is of the greatest value to dog owners, as it is entirely 
FREE FROM POISON, and at the same time most 
effective in the destruction of lice and fleas. Moreover, it 
keeps the skin free from scurf, prevents Mange and other 
skin diseases. No other soap should ever be used in pre- 
paring dogs for exhibition; it leaves the coat smooth and 
glossy. 

Spratts Patent Dog Soap contains no carbolic acid or coal 
tar, but is nicely perfumed and produces a fine lather. 
Recommended by kennel owners throughout the world. Once 
tried, always used. 

Price 20 cents per Tablet, by ma.il 

None but the best can be the -cheapest. 

Spratts Patent Antiseptic Soap 

is instant death to all parasites, lice, ticks, the mange para- 
site, bacteria, etc. Price per Tablet, 50c. 

Write for our Catalogue, " Dog Culture," with practical 
chapters on the feeding, kenneling and management of dogs, 
post free. 

We also manufacture a specially prepared food for dogs, 
puppies, rabbits, cats, poultry, game, pigeons, fish, birds, etc. 

SprcLtts Patent (America.) Limited 

450 Market St., Newark, N. J. 714 S. 4th St., St. Louis,. Mo. 
1324 Valencia St., San Francisco, Cal. 

I II ■■ ■■ ■ ■ I I «■■ m ill ■■■■■!■ ■!■ ■ W 1 1 ■■! ■ ■■ ■ II llll ■ ■ ■!■■■■ 

Sq/ua& ficrxfk fA&O, 

Squabs are raised in 1 month, bring; big 
prices. Eager market. Astonishing 
profits. Easy for women and invalids. 
Use your spare time profitably. Small 
space and capital. Here is something 
worth looking into. Facts given in our 
FREE BOOK, "How to make money 
with Squabs" PLYMOUTH ROCK 
SQUAB CO., 11 Friend St , Boston, Mass. 




Money in Squabs and Pheasants 

I sell BETTER breeders for less money than any other dealer 
in America, and you are sure to get ONE MALE and ONE 
FEMALE for a PAIR, not just TWO BIRDS. I will buy 
all you raise and pay you more than any one else. Send 
stamp for my catalogue which tells you all, plan, prices, etc. 
I have stock and eggs for sale at all times — PHEASANTS, 
POULTRY, PIGEONS, ANGORA CATS, SWANS, ALL 
kinds of RARE AND FANCY DUCKS, GEESE, PEA- 
FOWLS, Etc. I want to buy all kinds of WILD DUCKS 
AND GEESE, YOUNG WILD ANIMALS. 
No one has better stock than I or as cheap 

GENEI DeGUARDINER, Natick, Mass. 

Valley Farm Kennels, Simsotiry (HartfordCo.)Conn, 

Russian Wolfhounds 

The float Hagnificent Dogs That Live 

Fups and full grown d^gs from our champions for 
sale. Also Bull, Bo«tcn, Irish and Black-and-Tan 
Terriers, Cocker Spaniels, Bulldogs and American 
Foxhounds. Thorough br?d Poultry. Mew establish- 
ments stocked. Experienced attendants recommend- 
ed, etc. Catalogues. 

Cavies or Guinea Pigs 

Peruvian, Abyssinian or 
English Long or Short 
Haired. All colors. 400 
to select from. 

T. RACKHAM, 

East Orange, New Jersey. 




Taxidermists' c a!»SiR& 

and Animals 
Oologists' en\d m/T * _ ± 1 

sSp o p?i o i ogists ' Materials 

Send 5c. in stamps lor catalogue 

FBED. KAEMPFER, 88 d£f B T o E in T - 

Taxidermy work done in all its branches 

Mention Recreation 

For Sale. The largest collection of Game 
Heads, Horns, and Antlers in America. A 
total of TWO HUNDRED AND FIFTY 
SPECIMENS, including many record heads 
and exceptional freaks and rarities. Full 
information and catalogue on application. 
A. E. COLBURN, 
Bond Building, Washington, D. C. 

FLORIDA BIRDS. 

I have on hand a fair assortment of our Native Bird 
Skins, suitable for schools, museums or private collec- 
tions. 

During the season of 1903 I will collect any birds or 
mammals to order. 

Finest mounted work a specialty. 

R. D. HOYT, Taxidermist, 

SEVEN OAKS, FLA. 

Do you enjoy big game hunting? 
Or Trout Fishing? 

Or flountain Climbing? 

If so, write vs and we can accommodate you. 

We keep 65 head of horses. We employ a full corps 
of experienced guides, packers, and cooks. 

We have a complete outfit of riding saddles, pack 
saddles, tents, stoves, cooking utensils, tableware, and 
everything necessary for touring and camping in the 
Mountains. 

We live at Banff. The Eastern gateway of tha 
Canadian Rockies. 

And can send you anywhere you may wish to go irom 
this point 

North, East, South or West. 

Address: BKEWSTEB BROS* 

Banff, Alberta, Canada. 



INDIAN 

CURIOS 

"Wholesale & Retail 
Cukio Dkalers' 
Supply Depot. 
Bead Work, Baskets. Elk Teeth, Mexican 
Goods, Fossils, Minerals, Arrow- Heads, 
Pottery, Alaska Ivories, Shells, Agates, 
Photos, Great stock, Bi^Cata. 5c, stamps. 
Mention Recreation . 1 1 a dealer, say so . 

L. W. STILWELL 
Deadwood . ... so. Dakota 



FRFF To anyone subscribing to Recreation 
1 ,,l - l -■ through me J will give a cloth copy of 
one of Coopers, Dickens'. Dumas', Thackeray's or 
Conan Doyle's books. Address, 

J. M. RUGEN, 210S West Lake St., Chicago, 111. 





F 



'NE MOUNTED GAME HEADS 
BIRDS, ETC.. for sale at unheard-of prices.' 
bend 10 cents for photos. 
JOHN CLAYTON, Taxidermist, Lincoln, Maine, 



on o°rf Sale or Ex <^ange: Gun Cablet. 
Wk37x16}4 inches, made of beautiful bird's- 
eye maple anrl quartered oak; cost $60. 
Will sell for $35 or exchange for canvas 
boat or other desirable sporting goods. 
^ T. N. Billings, New Haven Mills, Vt. 



RECREATION. 



xlv 



$ 



Ostermoor IF Mattress * 1 5 




*)£$, if you YfilL iikUde OSte^AAoor \Y\ftttr esses 

(Even the children are waking up. A bright little girl, Edwina Howard of Rockyford, Col., appre-\ 
ciates the way a "proposal ' should be accepted to-day. Her entire drawing is reproduced./ 



^ T ELAST/c *. 



Every sale of an Ostermoor means that we have convinced somebody that Ostermoor Patent Elastic 
Felt is an improvement on the old-fashioned hair mattress and at a less price. It is the mark of progress — 
the breaking down of old ideas. If you still think a hair mattress is good, you may find out by qurfree trial 
offer (see below) than an Ostermoor is better. 

If you have learned by sad experience that even the most costly hair 
mattress will sag and lump- — that it takes many dollars or much dirty work (or 
both) to keep it clean and comfortable, you will rejoice in an Ostermoor that 
will wear and remain the acme of comfort for 20 to 30 years without renovation, 
with only an occasional sun-bath to keep it in perfect condition. It is vermin 
proof — moth proof. 

If you have read thus far, how can you keep from buying ? 

Perhaps you don't believe us ! That would not be surprising — many firms make exaggerated or, at 
least, over-enthusiastic claims. We want to be as conservative as we are fair. It costs you nothing to 
prove the truth of our claims in either one of two ways : 

THIRTY NIGHTS' FREE TRIAL. SEND FOR OUR FREE BOOK 




2 feet 6 inches wide, $C 3 C 

3 feet wide, 30 lbs. 10.00 

3 feet 6 inches wide, 1 1 7Q 

4 feet wide, 40 lbs. 13.35 
4 feet 6 inches wide, J C Aft 

All 6 feet 3 inches long. 
Express Charges Prepaid. 

In two parts, 50 cents extra. 
Special sizes at special prices. 



You can have an Ostermoor 
Mattress, sleep on it thirty 
nights, and if it is not better 
than any other mattress you 
have ever used — if it is not all 
you even HOPED for, return 
it at our expense and your 
money will be immediately 
refunded without question. 
"What more can we d~ to con- 
vince you ? 



of 96 handsomely illustrated 
pages, entitled "The Test of 
Time." A POSTAL WILL 
DO. Read the letters from 
men and women of national 
reputation. We can't BUY 
TESTIMONIALS from such 
men as Rev. Dr. Robt. S. 
MacArthur, C. Oliver Iselin, 
or such others as appear. The 
book also describes pillows, 
window-seat cushions, boat 
cushions, church cushions. 



EVERY GENUINE 

Ostermoor 

Mattress 

BEARS THE NAME 

Ostermoor 

AND TRADE-MARK LABEL 



OSTERMOOR & CO. 114 Elizabeth Street, New York. 

Canadian Agency: The Alaska Feather and Down Co., Ltd., Montreal. 



xlvi 



RECREATION. 



Fisk's Aerating 
Minnow Pa^il 



4@=The only 
Minnow Pail 
in which Min- 
nows can be 
kept alive in- 
definitely, 

Has an air 
chamber at 
the b ot torn 
holding 260CU- 
bic inches of 
condensed air 
forced in by 
the Air Pump 
attached, and 
by a simple 
rubberattach- 
menttheairis 
allowed to es- 
cape into the 
water gradu- 
ally supply- 
ing the fish 

with the oxygen consumed by them. One pumping 

is sufficient for ten hours. 

Height, 1 foot; diameter, 10 inches; weight, ^ l ^ 

lbs.; water, 2% gallons; keeps 50 to 150 minnows, 

according to their size. 

IT KEEPS THEM ALIVE 

Send for circular Mention Recreation 

J. M. KENYON & CO. 

214 Twelfth St., Toledo, Ohio, V. S. A. * 




For Sale : Winchester Repeating Shot 
Gun, 30 inch, full choke, fine Damascus 
barrel, 12 gauge, in fine shape throughout. 
Cost $27 ; will sell for $20 ; also 38-40 Win- 
Chester, model 92, fitted with Lyman sights ; 
in good shape. F. L. At well, Durham, 
Conn. 



Wanted : Good Second Hand 20 foot 
Gasoline Launch ; delivery any time before 
Nov. 1st. Geo. Scott, 184 South St., New 
York City, N. Y. 



For Sale or Exchange : Spaniel Pups 
3 months old. 

E. A. Cooley, Rodman, N. Y. 



r Points on Angling* 



WW! 



More complete than ever before 

The Habits and 
Haunts of 

GAME FISH 

and How to Catch Them 

Mailed free on application 

THE SPECIALTY riFG. COI1PANY 
Box 62a, Goshen, Indiana 




Looking for 

Fishing 
Tackle? 

If so, write us for cat- 
logue and price list. We 
publish the most com- 
plete book of this kind 
ever put out. We list 
and illustrate in it about 
everything that an angler 
ever needs on a fishing 
trip. 

And we sell the goods 
as low as high quality 
goods can possibly be 
sold. 

Every angler in the 
United States should 
have a copy of this book 
for ready reference. 

Write for it. We will do the rest. 

WM. MILLS & SON 

21 Park Place, New York 



ATTENTION BASS FISHERMEN !! 

What It Is. A Bass lure combining all 
the good points of the old fashioned spinner 
baits with the construction of the modern 
wooden minnow. 

What It Will Do. This lure is construc- 
ted in a new manner with a new feature and 
will catch more bass than any other artifi- 
cial lure. 

How To Get It. Send one dollar to 
Recreation for a year's subscription to be 
credited to my account aud I will mail you 
one postpaid. W. B. HAYNES, 274 Park 
Street, Akron, Ohio. 



GUNNERS AND ANGLERS 




Here is what you need. A powerful, compact 
Electric Flashlight to carry in the pocket. 

The hardest storm cannot blow out this light, 
nor can your fingers become too cold to operate it. 

A brilliant light instantly, without noise or 
delay, just press the button. 

Safe in the stable or hay loft where lamp or 
candle would be dangerous. 

Price, $2.00. Good for 5,000 flashes; then a 
new battery for 30 cents. Send for Cataogue. 

American Electrical Novelty and Mfg. Co. 

Dept. A— Hudson & Spring Sts., NEW YORK 

Depl. H— Masonic Temple, CHICAGO 



• 



RECREATION. 





One enthusiastic sportsman— a constant 
user and admirer of the 

"BRISTOL' STEEL RODS 

has his occasional habitat in the camp 
above pictured. He writes: — 

"I have discarded my split bamboo and my wood rods I 
formerly 'swore by,' and am 'in love with' the 'BRIS- 
TOLS ' you sent me. Tell the boys to throw away all 
nonsensical prejudice, and hasten to form the acquaintance 
of a 'Bristol' Rod — for there's millions (of fish) in it." 

We will send you our free catalogue if you like — then you 
can do as you choose. 

The Horton Manufacturing Company 

No. 73 Horton Street, Bristol, Conn. 



xlviii 



RECREATION. 




i ... mm mm. » .',■!•■ ,j"u i ",, i- m wmmmm^^ mmmmm^m '. •j...u. 

••II - hi - : "•• ----■'- ■'-"• mm ■ma --•---•■ ■ ' j^jg 



^ 



;-s 



WITH A "Y AND E" 
AUTOMATIC REEL 

vou simplypress a lever with your little finger, instead of winding a crank like fury. 
The reel takes in every bit of slack, no matte-r how quickly your hsh may turn. The 

resuItis YOU LAND YOVR FISH 



sorts of '-rough and ready " use. . 

It's " all off " with any other reel when a " Y and E gets into the game. 

1903 MONEY PRIZES 

There are 5 of them— 3 of $25.00 each for anybody over 16, and 2 of $15 each for Boys 

(and Girls) not over 
16. Write to-day 

for free contest 
blank and hand- 
some new catalogue 

"299 R." 

I 




Little 

finger 
does 

"Y AND E 

Automatic 
Style 1 

A man's reel, but mighty fine for a boyf Carries and auto- 
matically rewinds 90 feet. Weight 8 oz. Diameter 3 1-32 inches. 

Price $5.00 




Automatic Combination, Style B 
Price $8.00 

The only perfect reel for fty-and bait-casting. Either 
free or automatic instantly, by the slipping of a catch. 
Diameter, 3% in. Weight, 11 oz. Carries 300 feet. Winds 
90 feet automatically, without rewinding. Buy from 
your hardware or sporting goods dealer. If he can't 
supply you, we'll mail to you prepaid on receipt of price 
anywhere in the U. S. or Canada. 4 other styles. 

YAWMAN <& ERBE MFG. CO. 

Rochester, N, Y. 



Main Factories and Ex. Offices 












I 



AN IMPORTANT OFFER 

For 2 Yearly Subscriptions to RECREATION 

I will send you 

A RIFLE WICK PLUG 

Made by Hemm & Woodward, Sidney, Ohio, 30 caliber 
up to 50 caliber. 

OR 

A SHOT GUN WICK PLUG 

20 gauge up to 10 gauge 

For 3 Yearly Subscriptions to RECREATION 

A Pair of Shot Gun Wick Plugs 

20 to 10 gauge. 
Sample copies for use in canvassing furnished on 
application. 

Address RECREATION, 23W. 24th St., N .Y. City 



Free : For i year's subscription of Rec- 
reation, through me, will give I Bromide 
enlargement, any size up to 11x14 inches, 
inclusive, from any negative not larger than 
4x5; or from photographs. Negatives and 
Photos are to be returned to the owner. 
Here is a rare chance to get a large Photo 
from your pet Negative, also Recreation 
for $1. A. F. Evarts, Meriden, Conn. 

White Mountain Views Free 

To any person sending me a subscription to 
Recreation accompanied by $1. I will send two 
mounted photos, on velox paper taken among the 
White Mountains, size 6x8; one shows Mt. Wash- 
ington snow capped. To any one sending 2 sub- 
scriptions with $2 I will send a souvenir of the 
White Mountains, size 4% x 5^ containing seven 
photos. Send P. O. Mpney Order. 

M. E. TVTTLE, Box 337 Dover, N. H. 



mUUJl JJU...U 




THE above cut shows our INDEPENDENT EVEN SPOOLING DEVICE that level winds your 
line on the spool of the reel, and also shows our SPRING LOCK HOOK SHIELD that muzzles and 
locks to the pole that dangling hook when not in use. We. also make the Lightning Fish Scaler. Our prices 
are quoted in April, May and June numbers of Recreation. 

Descriptive Catalog free on request, Mention Recreation. 

A. W. BISHOP & SON. - , Racine. Wis. 






RECREATION. 



xlix 





HIGHEST QUALITY 
FISHING TACKLE 



Agents for the New 

Liberty Red 

J net Out BestModel and 
Ll^l V714L* most improved 

Fishing Reel yet produced, 

SPECIAL FEATURES : 

The drag is applied by the Handle. 
Tension of Click adjusted at will, or Free 
Running, if preferred 

Easily and quickly taken apart, 

German Silver and Hard Rubber, 

ioo yard Quadruple. 

Surely see this High-Grade Reel. 



PRICE, $7.50. 



Established 1826 



Sportsmen's Outfits and 
Fine Guns 

Send 6 Cents for full Illustrated Catalogue. 

WM. READ & SONS 

107 Washington Street, BOSTON 



Small Profits— Quick Sales 



TROUT 
FLIES 



for trial— sent us 



4 E|/"» for an assorted sample doz. 




Regular price, 24 cents. 

for an assorted sample 
Regular price, 60 cents. 



Quality A Flies 



lA/i for an assorted sample doz. flliall-h/ R FIlOO 
JUt Regular price, 60 cents. yUdllLy D rlltjb 



• f\r% for an assorted sample doz. 
OV/V* Regular price, 84 cents. 

60c 



Quality C Flies 



for an assorted dozen Doqq F"llPQ 
Regular price 84 cents. DaoO FliCO 



SPLIT BAMBOO RODS 



Fly Rods £-v f»faM+c Bait Rods 

10 feet, 6 ounces ^ I V/CUl^ g feet, 8 ounces 

With cork grip and extra tip, in wood form 



Try our new Braided Silk Enameled Waterproof 

METAL CENTER LINE 

Size No. 5j 4% cents per yard. Size No. 4, §% cents per yard 
Put up in iQ-yard lengths connected. 



THE H H. KIFFE CO. 

523 Broadway, New York City 

C^&logs of any of above goods free on application 
Mention Reckeauq^, 



*■§ 



IT NEVER FAILS 

The S. & W. Artificial Bait 

Is the most successful 
bait made. 

When in motion it re- 
sembles a minnow so 
closely that it never fails 
to delude the fish. 
Its construction makes 
it almost impossible for 
a fish to strike and not 
get caught. 

A GREAT SELLER 

Do you fish? Buy one. 
You will never be with- 
out one afterward. 
Why? It will catch fish. 
Can be used with rod or 
hand line. 

Dealers send for illustrated 
booklet and get our prleeg. 

If your dealer cannot supply you, send 50e. 
at once for one (post paid) to 

STARK & WECKESSER 

57 S, Maia St..:-: i DAYTON, 0!!I0, U. S. A. 




1 



RECREATION. 



For Fishing 

Dvick Shooting 

Cruising 

Or Exercising 




GET A 



BURTON 



Sectioned 



For 



convenience it is away ahead of any one-piece boat in transporting. 

You set one section into the other, lash 
them together, and ship by rail or wagon, 
anywhere you wish to go. 

Or you can carry them from lake to lake, 
or from river to river, easily and com- 
fortably. 

Made of Galvanized Steel, Non-rusting. 
No Wood Used in Construction. 
Light, Safe, Durable, Non-Sinkable. 

Write for Illustrated Catalogue. Address 

The Old Hickory Chair Co. 

MARTINSVILLE, IND. 

Mention Recreation. 





PATENTS 



Quickly secured. OUR FEE DUE WHEN PATENT 
OBTAINED. Send model, sketch or photo, with 
description for free report as to patentability. 48 -PAGE 
HAND-BOOK FREE. Contains references and full 
information. WRITE FOR COPT OF OUR SPECIAL 
OFFER. It is the most liberal proposition ever made by 
a patent attorney, and EVERY INVENTOR SHOULD 
READ IT before applying for patent. Address: 

H.B.WILLS0NKO.I 

PATENT LAWYERS, 

U ProitBidg., WASHINGTON, D. C. 



No Other Reel Will Give 



Satisfaction after you 
have seen the 




A thing more perfect was never wrought 
in metal. In tournaments always a victor. 
Among fishermen's treasures, the chief, 
Send for Booklet Fs 

W. H. TALBOT, Nevada, Mo 



ajj^tiJWiwMj iij u^j, 



RECREATION. 



a 




BOLLARD STEEL LAUNCHES, 

ROW AND PLEASURE BOATS, 
ARE EVERLASTING! 

Safer than wood; have greater carrying capacity; 
always dry; no bolts or nails to rust. 



FAY&BOWEN 

Motors & 
Launches 




Boat Liveries equipped with the Bullard Steel Boats. 
Always have dry boats, that last a lifetime. 

STEEL BOATS CHEAPER THAN WOOD. 




THE OSGOOD FOLDING CANVAS BOATS 



Original Canvas Boat; made for 30 years. Sold all 
over the world; used by U. S. Government; best Fish- 
ing and Hunting is where there are no boats, take one 
with you in trunk or bag. Non-puncturable. Folded 
or extended in one minute. 

Send for catalogue illustrating all improved pop- 
ular designs of Steel, Wood, and Canvas Boats, and 
Marine Engines. & 

MICHIGAN CONSOLIDATED BOAT CO., LTD. 
55 Main St., Battle Creek, Mich. 



THE HILDEBRANDT SPINNER 

For Fly Fishermen. A 
spinner which spins, and 
also catches fish. Strictly 
hand-made and of the 
best material. No swivel 
required. Made with 
all kinds of Feather and 
Buck-tail flies. For sale by dealers. Sent on receipt of 25c. 

J. J. HILDEBRANDT, Logansport, Ind. 



For Sale: — One Chesapeake Bay dog, n 
months old. Also young Chesapeake Bay 
puppies. They all are eligible to register. 
Maurice Schindler, Sisseton, S. D. 




jl Operated by 

Gasoline Vapor 

Motors VA to 25 H.P. 



THE Fay & Bowen Marine Motor is a revela- 
tion to those who have used others. Reli- 
able, safe, durable and easy to operate. 
Remarkable speed control. Best of all, it starts 
when you start it. No handle of crank is used. 
Our patent igniter is absolutely unique and al- 
ways instant and positive in action. It is real y 
the only perfect and satisfactory igniter. 

Motors complete from i 1 ^ to 25 H. P. ready 
for installation. We also build handsome 
launches with motors installed and ready to run 
Send for Catalogue. 

Fay 61 Bowen, 



28 Mill Street, 



Auburn, N. Y. 



SEARCHLIGHTS 

" The Clear View" 

For Steamboats, Yachts, Launches, 
Sailboats, Automobiles, etc. A re- 
liable light at small cost. Write for 
Catalogue. 

American Acetylene Stove Co. 

536 Hennepin Ave. 

MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 



For Exchange: Moose head, in good 
condition, for a Goerz field glass or some 
make of equal value, or a good hammerless 
gun. J. W. B., care of Recreation. 




PALMER 



Gasoline Engines and Launches 

LAUNCHES IN STOCK 

17 ft. 1^-H. P. Engine $195 20 ft. 3-H. P, Engine $300 

25 ft. 5-H. P. Engine $500 

These boats are built of the best cedar and oak obtainable, 
arH are copper fastened throughout. 

Manufactured by 

PALMER BROS. - Cos Cob, Conn. 

NBW YORK OFFICE, 136 Uiwrty Street 




iil 



RECREATION. 




Handsome 

oats 

Perfect running 

Motors 



AGENCIES IN PRINCIPAL CITIES 

5 Stamps for Catalog's©. 



ST. JOSEPH, MICH. 



FREE.! 



m^'&mgGaSSfiffiHE ENGINES BcLJVONCHES^Smp^a^ 





ACME FOLDING BOAT €0., MIAMISKLKU, ©. 

U. S. Government who prefer our boats. 



Send for catalogue of our full line of Folding 
Canvas Boats and Canoes, which have been 
adopted by Governments of United States* 
Canada and England. Just filled an order for 
Received medal and award at Chicago World's 



Fair.! If you investigate we will get your order, Mention .Recreation. 






_ 



To Owners of Gasoline 

Engines, Aiitoi*"»biies,- 

Liannche*, Etc. 

The AUTQ-SPARKER 

does away entirely with all starting 
and running batteries their annoy- 
ance and expense. No belt — no 
switch-no batteries. Can be attached 
to any iiioine now using batteries 
Fnlly guaranteed ; write for de- 
scriptive calalotr- 

iVSotsinger Device Mfg. Co- 

75 Main Sr . Pendleton, Ind 



ilARINE GAS ENGINES 

Experts for years have ranked our engines with the highest 
grade, and it is now being copied by other builders. We al- 
ways endeavor to be on top and for 1903 offer an engine built 
from brand new patterns, with NEW and ORIGINAL 
features — just what other engines will have five years hence. 

If you want to be in the lead send for catalog fully describ- 
ing all parts, and then buy a " Rochester " . 

ROCHESTER, GAS ENGINE CO. 
700 Driving Park Ave. Rochester, N. Y., F. S. A. 



Messrs. Schoverling, Daly & Gales, New 
York, write us that a customer of theirs 
wishes to sell a prosperous, well estab- 
lished sporting goods business in one of 
the most enterprising cities of Pennsyl- 
vania, with a population of 38,000 in the 
city and 75,000 in the county. Cash re- 
ceipts $11,000 to $17,000 per annum. Stock 
well selected and in first class order ; cost 
$11,500. The business and good will will 
be closed out for immediate cash at 5 per 
cent, discount on the invoiced value of the 
stock, and nothing added for the good will. 
The reason for selling is that the owner 
has accepted a lucrative position, which re- 
quires all his time and attention. 



Mvillin's Galvanized Steel Boasts 




THE QUEEN, 15 FEET, MODEL; PRICE, $29.00 

The most durable and best boat on the market. Fitted with air chambers, makes it safe. No repairs. Always 
ready. Will last a lifetime, Send for copy of our handsome illustrated catalogue with full description and prices. 

W. H, MXJIfMNS, 328 Depot Stteet s Salem, Ohio, 



kkCREATION. 



in 



A Rushton Canoe 





combines all the excellences that selected material, skillful craftsmanship and honest 
making can compass. 

The Indian Girl model, shown ahove, is graceful, swift and staunch; it is made of cedar, 
canvas-covered, 15, 16, 17 and 18 feet long, in two grades, costing from $30.00 to $43.00. 

I make the largest variety of pleasure boats and canoes produced by any one 
establishment in America. This is my 30th year. 

Send for free catalogue of pleasure boats, all-cedar and canvas-covered canoes, oars, paddles, sails and fittings. 

J. H. RUSHTON, 817 Water Street, CANTON, N. Y. 



■j-inj .1-i.iin — 




LE^M^OST BOAT COMPANY 

WINNECONNE, WIS. 
Manufacturers of Gasoline Launches, Sail, Row and Hunting Boats. Our prices are low, 
our work guaranteed. Launches, $150 up. Row Boats, ^ 22 up. Hunting Skiffs, $20 
up. The oldest Boat Company in the State. Write for Wants. Mention Recreation. 



To 

Amateur 
Photographers 

Here is a Chance to Get a 
FINE CAMERA EASILY 

A 4x5 Tourist Hawk-eye film camera listing 
at $8, for 5 yearly subscriptions to RECREATION. 
A No. 3 folding Weno Hawk-eye film camera, 
listed at $15, for 10 yearly subscriptions to 
RECREATION^ 

These are both neat, compact, well made and 
handsomely finished cameras, capable of doing 
high-class wor'K, 

Sample eopiesfov use in canvas- 
sing furnished on request. 

Address RECREATION, 
23 "^est 24th St, New York City. 




ll°foot Special 
Folding Canvas Boats were not satisfactory 
until the King was produced. It's a revelation 

in boat construction Nothing like it ever made. 
Nonsinkable Can't tip over. Puncture- 
proof. Wear longer than a wooden boat- No 
repairs. No cost for storage. Always ready. 
Folds into a small neat package, — carry by hand. 
Used by the U. S. Navy. They are simply won- 
derful. A thoroughly patented article, Beware of 
imitation. Made only by ourselves. 

A catalogue of 70 engravings and 350 testimonials 
sent on receipt of 6 cents. 
Mention Recreation. 

King Folding Canvas Boat Co. 

Kalamazoo, Mich,, U. S. A* 



liv 



RECREATION. 




LATEST, SAFEST 







S 




Is What We ofler you. A Boat built on modern linesthat will 
prove a pleasure to own and use. Selected materials used 
throughout, and it comes to you guaranteed the best. A handy 
and safe boat for fishing and shooting. Send 4 cents in stamps 
for catalogue and reliable testimonials. 

Mention Recreation'. 

LIFE SAVING FOLDING CANVAS BOAT CO. 

Kalamazoo, Mich* 




Latest patent and improved Canvas Folding Boat on the 
Market. Puncture proof. Tempered steel frame. No bolts 
to remove. Folds most compact of any boat made. 




RECREATION. 



iv 




IN THE ADIRONDACKS— The New Hermitage 

At Lake Bonaparte, New York, 

Once the property of King Joseph Bonaparte, and named in his honor. 

The hotel has all the modern improvements and accessories. Broad verandas, wide 
roomy halls, large open fire-places, reading rooms, billiard rooms, telephone, daily mail. 

Guests have the opportunity of enjoying delightful rowing, canoeing, bathing. The 
finest fishing in the Adirondacks, Croquet, Tennis. 

A park containing 800 acres ; beautiful walks and drives. 

Handsomely illustrated book, giving full information, sent on request. Mention 
Recreation. 

DAVID SCANLIN, Proprietor, Bonaparte, New York. 



MUSKOKA LAKE, ONL, CANADA 
Beaumaris Hotel 

Finest situation on the Muskoka Lakes. 
Has been remodeled and enlarged. First 
class Nine-Hole Golf Links, Tennis Lawn, 
Bathing, Boating, Fishing. Best place in 
the country for hay fever people. Write 
for booklet. 

EDWARD PROWSE 
PROPRIETOR 

ADIRONDACKS 

CAMP MOHAWK and 
COTTAGES 



HOTEL AYERS 



LAKE DUANE 



Fourth Lake, Fulton Chain. 

Set'" Mrs. H. H. Longstaff, OW N F £ ge - 



IN THE ADIRONDACKS 

Indian I^ake Mouse 

riountain View, N. Y. 
C.C. Morgan, Prop. All the Year 

All passenger trains on A. & St. L. R . R. will be met by boat 
and 'bus. Passengers conveyed directly to the house. 



Rates. $2 per Day. 



Special Rates to Parties 



4**. DEER HUNTING and TROUT FISHING to be found 
in the Adirondacks 



Adirondacks 



Franklin County 



DO YOU KNOW THE BEAUTIES 
OF THE GREAT NORTH WOODS? 

Here are some of the things you can find at Ayers: 

Deer, trout, and cedar boats. 

Thousands of acres of primeval for- 
ests that the fires did not find this 
spring. 

Seven beautiful lakes and several 
miles of shore line. 

2 000 feet elevation; magnificent 
mountain scenery. 

Balsim-scented air; water from 
mountain springs. 

Tennis, bowling, croquet and ping 
pong. 

Splendid fishing, hunting, boating, 
and bathing. 

Excellent Cuisine and Good 
Beds. 

Wide verandas, open fires, post office 
and telegraph in house. 

Miles of picturesque trails; an ideal 
forest home. 

Write for booklet, itinerary; terms 
and references. 

W. J. AYERS & SON 

Ayers, Franklin County, N* Y* 



ivi 



RECREATION. 



Newhouse Traps 




THE STANDARD FOR OVER FIFTY YEARS 

Used by all professional hunters and trappers, 
who find that 

The Best Trap is the Cheapest 

Complete illustrated catalogue on 
application. 

ONEIDA COMMUNITY, LTD., Kenwood, N. Y. 



"Collan-Oil" 

preserves leather and 
renders shoes and 
harness positively 

WATERPROOF 

Used by the U. S. 

the Army and Navy, 

and National Guard. 

Send 25c. for trial can. 

AGENTS WANTED 

Write for terms and circulars 

J. R. BUCKELEW 
Dept. A. jj \ Chambers St., N. Y. 



W&ttrprotif ':■ 

LEATHER 

DRESSING 

---•.v'A#b' ° - 

RUST; 

PREVENTER 



DuPont Smokeless 

AT THE 

PENNSYLVANIA STATE SHOOT 

(Open and State Events Combined) 

Mr. J, T. Atkinson, of New Castle, won 

HIGH AVERAGE 

Breaking 495 out of 525 Targets 
Shooting 

DuPonf Smokeless 



KOENIG'S SHELL EXTRACTOR. 

Every shooter should 

have one — carry it in a 

vest pocket. Fits any 

gauge shell. Koenig's 

10 Cts. Postpaid. Gun Catalogue, Free. 

E.G.Koenig, new Jersey's LargestGun House 

sooth broad st., newark, im . j, 




THE BRADLEY SHOT GUN SIGHT 

Wing Shooting is 
made easy and cer- 
tain by using this gun 
sight. Scores at trap 
and in field greatly 
increased by its use. 
Right and left birds 
are bagged as easily 
as straight-awav birds. Price SO Cents, Postpaid. 
C. L. BRADLEY, Inventor, Clarksville, Tenn. 




SOME GOOD GUIDES. 

Following are names and addresses of guides 
who have been recommended to me, by men 
who have employed them; together with data 
as to the species of game and fish which these 
guides undertake to find for sportsmen. 

If anyone who may employ one of these 
guides should find him incompetent or un- 
satisfactory, I will be grateful if he will report 
the fact to me. 

ALASKA. 
Edwin Edelmann, Kenai, Cook's Inlet, moose, 

bear, caribou, mountain sheep, ducks, grouse 

and trout. 

FLORIDA. 
Carson Bros., Frostproof, bear, deer, turkeys, quail, 

snipe. 
C. H. Stokes, Mohawk, deer, alligators, turkey, 

quail, and snipe. 

IDAHO. 

John Ching, Kilgore, elk, bear, deer, antelope, 
mountain sheep, trout and grouse. 

Chas. Petty's, Kilgore, ditto. 

MAINE. 
H. R. Horton, Flagstaff, deer, tear, moose, cari- 
bou, fox, grouse and trout. 
W. C; Holt, Hanover, moose, caribou, deer, grouse and 
trout. 

MONTANA. 
A. R. Hague, Fridley, elk, deer, mountain sheep, 
bear, grouse and trout. 

Chas. Marble, Chestnut, ditto. 
NEW YORK. 
Le Roy Still, Bayport, Long Island, ducks, quails, 
rabbits and grouse. 

WYOMING. 
S. N. Leek, Jackson, elk, bear, deer, mountain 

sheep, antelope, grouse and trout. 
James L. McLaughlin, Valley, elk, bear, deer, 
mountain sheep, antelope, grouse and trout. 
CANADA. 
Wm. S. Andrews, Lillooet, B. C, deer, bear, 
mountain sheep, goats, grouse and trout. 

B. Norrad, Boiestown, N. B., moose, caribou, 

grouse and trout. 
Carl Bersing, Newcastle, N. B., moose, caribou, 

deer, bear and grouse. 

Big Game Hunters 

FISHING AND OUTING PARTIES 

Before planning trips other than in New Brunswick, 
should apply to 

The New Brunswick Guides Association 
Predericton, New Brunswick, Canada, 

for information. The Association comprises the leading 
and most reliable guides in the Province. 

Hunting Map of New Brunswick 

Showing rivers, lakes, portage roads, car- 
ries, etc. Scale, \ l / 2 miles to the inch, and 
folded to suit pocket. Mailed to any address 
on receipt of price, $1.50. Checks accepted. 
FRANK WHITEHEAD, 
Fredericton, New Brunswick, 
P.O.Box 303 Canada. 



George Stables 



Dealer in Fancy Gro- 
ceries, etc. Sportsmen's 
= Provisions a specialty. 
Only the best quality goods kept in stock. Prices on 
application. Public Square, Newcastle on the 
Miramichi, NEW BRUNSWICK. 

For Sale or Exchange — A scholarship 
of complete course in electrical engineering 
at International Correspondence Schools, 
Scranton, Pa. 

J. E. Jones, Atoka, Indian Territory. 



RECREATION. 



lvii 



FORTY-EIGHT 
PAGES 



are required just to describe a lot of in- 
teresting booklets of travel, any one of 
which can be obtained by sending a 
few cents in stamps. These forty-eight 
pages make the 

ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE 



NEW YORK CENTRAL'S 



ft 



" FOUR-TRACK SERIES 

Embracing 37 Books of Travel. 

A copy of this catalogue will be sent 
free, post-paid to any address, on receipt 
of a two-cent stamp, by 



GEORGE H. DANIELS, 

Gen'l Passenger Agent, 
Grand Central Station, New York. 



M 



" Going- Into the Woods n 

IS NOW THE POPULAR FAD 

at ••* a Is the Recognized Summer 
1 II V Playground of the Nation 

There can be found all the pleasures of Fishing* 

Hunting, Canoeing, Mountain Climbing 

and Absolute Rest. 

During the summer season there are Four 

Express Trains daily to Bar Harbor, Three 

Express Trains daily to the White Mountains. 

One through train New York to Bar Harbor 

Through. Trains to All Hunting 
and Fishing Resorts. 

bend for Guide. Books and Maps. 

F. E. BOOTHBY, General Passenger Agent. 
GEO. F. EVANS, Vice-Pres. and Gen. Mgr., 
Portland, Me. 



I would like to correspond with a few 
Sportsmen and Sportswomen relative to 
unexplored regions. Beautiful undisturbed 
Nature, pure air, pure water, big game, big 
fish, trout and muskalonge. One day's 
paddle from railroad. E. C. TRIPP, 

Atikokan, Ontario, Canada, Seine River Dist. 



10c. 



SEND 

FOR 

IT 



'Haunts of the Hunted" 

Published by the 

[ & UNSlNk I. L 




Entirely new Guide book for 7QOJ, 
descriptive of Northern Maine. 
Book of 200 pages, finely illust- 
rated by wore than TOO Jialf-tone 
cuts and with two full pages 
in colors. Write to Dept. H 
and enclose 10 cents in stamps. 



GEO. M. HOUGHTON, 

Traffic Manager 
BANGOR, ME. 




BALTIMORE TO 
BOSTON AND PROVIDENCE 

BY SEA VIA 

HERCHAHTS AND MIHEBS TRAHS. CO. 



Accommodations and Cuisine unsurpassed. 
Complimentary side trip to Old Point. 
Send for illustrated Tour Book. 
Steamers leave Baltimore daily for the East. 
For further information address W. P. TURNER, 
Gen'l Pass. Agent, Baltimore. 

Chatham Beach Hotel 

Chatham, Mass., affords the finest shore bird shooting in 
New England, and being situated on a clean sand beach, one 
hundred feet from the Ocean, commands coolest breezes, fine 
view, good bathing, fishing, sailing, etc. Rates $2.50 per 
day; reduced rates for families. For further particulars 
apply to 



N. A. ELDRIDGE 



Chatham, Mass 



BEST FISHING At OUTLET HOUSE 



AND 



FINE HUNTING 



(Formerly Moosehead House), MOOSEHEAD, ME. 11 miles from Green- 
ville by C. P. R. R. or by Steamer, 

CHARLES. E. WILSON » Propr. 

New steamboat just bought to accommodate our guests. 
Earliest and latest Moosehead lake fishing is had here; also plenty of big game. House has been entirely refurnished ; 
rooms have hot and cold water and baths. Grounds nicely graded, tennis court, croquet grounds and many fine 
woods roads laid out. Fishermen can avoid expense of guide by coming here, although wefurni.-h guides, boats and 
canoes when desired. Several camps in our " string," all snug and .attractive. Rates #2.00 to $250 per day. De- 
scriptive Booklet sentf ree. 






/- 



Ne who use Traps 




rm r >r/-' ( u/->u 



OVER FIFTY YEARS 



... 

o 

Thr ; Best Trap is the Cheapest 

I -. ■'..-. 

r > -J JIM COMHUHITY, LTD , lUttWOQd, W« Y. 



LEATHER 

AMP * 

RUST, 

PBEVCNTW 



U< |-i 



" Collan-Oil " 

pfefervei (eafbef and 

render:-, i.hneu and 
\\A.rne\.v. positively 

Wr/l'J JU'PkOOF 
WvA by tfae U, & 

the. Army and Navy, 

And Nation;;! ( /uard. 

'.' nd 25c J',' 1 rial can. 

/•.M.r.'T\ 7/ANThD 
Wn ' ' foi 1 <• j in', a 'I '.j 1 mi J.-jr :. 

J, R, BUCKELEW 
A. in Cfaamben .St., N. Y. 



DuPont Smokeless 

A'l 'I III'. 

PENNSYLVANIA STATK SHOOT 

C >|<< n .1 n<i ' itate Eventi ( lombincd) 

Mr. .1, T. Atkinson, of New Gaulle, won 

MKiil AVERAGE 

BfoqJi in]- ,|i)'; <>u 1 of 525 Tai gets 
. ihootins 

DuPont Smokeless 



KOENIG'3 SHELL EXTRACTOR. 

PV^V^^ j*u— J^^\ l(\.-i y Mhoold should 

j I) ir Hi have one carryil Ina 

r^Jfy V *' — SwJ/vHil ,..,, !,,■!. hits any 

Sv^ a 1 uge shell. Koenig's 

10 Ctf< Postpaid <•"" Catalogue, Free. 

I .(. KOf IMI(«. Nl W .11 Ht.l YU LAHGE.ST GUN House 
iiMIIM IIMIMII ••!., NtWAIlH, N. J. 



THE RWADLEY SHOT GUN SIGHT 




p- - _ . — 



W 1 n r. Shooting is 
made ens : and cer- 



tain i>\' using 1 his gun 
sight S< "i es -n (1 ap 
1 M. 1 in field greatly 
mi 1 eased by its use. 
M Ui.'Ih .m.i left birds 

.11 >■ haggeil .is easily 

1 uralght awu\ birds P| Lot ft) Outs, rosttmld. 
Q, l. UKADl.l Y. Inventor, Ctarksvillc, Tenn. 



< . . . '. . ~ . - . -.' ■/ <-. T. 1 c . ..::._ •• . _ .:" 

•:--_.-'•- • -' - .-...-■__- 

If anyone who may employ one of these 

guides should find him incompetent or un- 

.ry, I will be grateful if he will report 

the :V/. to we, 

ALAS 
..delmann, Kenai, Cook's Inlet, moose, 
. - , caribou, mountain sheep, duck 
and trout. 

FLORIDA. 
Carson Bros., Frostproof, bear, deer, turkeys, quail, 

•nig 
C. i: /hawk, deer, alligators, turkey, 

quail, and snipe. 

IDAHO. 
:; ..re, elk, bear, deer, antelope, 
'.rout and grouse. 

I Petty ,, : 

MAI . 
H. EL Jforton, Flagstaff, deer, tear, moose, cari- 
na, fox, grouse and trout. 
W. Cl Holt, Hanover, rnoose. caribou, deer, grouse and 
tr'.ut. 

MONTANA. 
A. P. Hague, Pridley, elk, deer, mountain sheep, 

, ■ -. nd trout. 
Cbas, Marble, Chestnut, ditto. 
NEW YORK. 
I.- Roy Still, Bayport, Long Island, ducks, quails, 
rabbits and grouse. 

WYOMING. 
S, .'.'. Leek, Jackson, elk, bear, deer, mountain 

sheep, antelope, grouse and trout. 
James I.. McLaughlin, Valley, elk, bear, deer, 
mountain slic-p, antelope, grouse and trout. 

CANADA. 
Win. S. Andrews, Lillooet, B. C, deer, bear, 
mountain sheep, goats, grouse and trout. 

I'.. Norrad, Boicstown, N. B., moose, caribou, 
grouse and trout. 

Carl I'.ersing, Newcastle, N. B., moose, caribou, 
deer, hear and grouse. 

Big Ga>me Hunters 

PISHING AND OUTING PARTIES 

lief ore planning trips other ttian in New Brunswick, 
should apply to 

The New Brunswick Guides Association 

Prcdericton, New Brunswick, Canada, 

for information. The Association comprises the leading 
ami most reliable guides in the Province. 

Hunting Map of New Brunswick 

Showing rivers, lakes, portage roads, car- 
ries, etc. Scale, 4^ miles to the inch, and 
folded to suit pocket. Mailed to any address 
on receipt of price, $1.50. Checks accepted. 
FRANK WHITEHEAD, 
Fredericton, New Brunswick, 
P.O. Box 303 Canada. 



George Stables 



Dealer in Fancy Gro- 
ceries, etc. Sportsmen's 
— Provisions a specialty. 
Only tin- best quality goods kept In stock. Prices on 
application. Public Square, Newcastle on the 
Mimmichi, NEW BRUNSWICK. 

For Sale or Exchange — A scholarship 
of complete course in electrical engineering 
at International Correspondence Schools, 
Scranton, Pa. 

J. K. Jones, Atoka, Indian Territory. 



RECREATION. 



lvii 



FORTY-EIGHT 
PAGES 



are required just to describe a lot of in- 
teresting booklets of travel, any one of 
which can be obtained by sending a 
few cents in stamps. These forty-eight 
pages make the 

ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE 



NEW YORK CENTRAL'S 



ft 



" FOUR-TRACK SERIES 

Embracing 37 Books of Travel. 

A copy of this catalogue will be sent 
free, post-paid to any address, on receipt 
of a two-cent stamp, by 



GEORGE H. DANIELS, 

Gen'l Passenger Agent, 
Grand Central Station, New York. 



" Going- Into the Woods " 

IS NOW THE POPULAR FAD 

Mm y m a Is the Recognized Summer 
(X I II V Playground of the Nation 

There can be found all the pleasures of Fishingi 

Hunting, Canoeing, Mountain Climbing 

and Absolute Rest. 

During the summer season there are Four 
Express Trains daily to Bar Harbor, Three 
Express Trains daily to the White Mountains. 
One through train New York to Bar Harbor 

Through. Trains to All Hunting 
and Fishing Resorts. 

bend for Guide. Books and Maps. 

F. E. BOOTHBY, General Passenger Agent. 
GEO. F. EVANS, Vice-Pres. and Gen. Mgr., 
Portland, Me. 



I would like to correspond with a few 
Sportsmen and Sportswomen relative to 
unexplored regions. Beautiful undisturbed 
Nature, pure air, pure water, big game, big 
fish, trout and muskalonge. One day's 
paddle from railroad. E. C. TRIPP, 

Atikokan, Ontario, Canada, Seine River Dist. 



10c. 



SEND 

FOR 

IT 



'Haunts of the Hunted" 

Published by the 

r & imsiott R. L 




Entirely neiu Guide book for IQOJ, 
descriptive of Northern Maine. 
Book of 200 pages, finely illust- 
rated by more than 100 half-tone 
cuts and ivith two full pages 
in colors. "Write to Dept. H 
and enclose 10 cents in stamps. 



GEO. M. HOUGHTON, 

Traffic Manager 
BANGOR, ME. 




BALTIMORE TO 
BOSTON AND PROVIDENCE 

BY SEA VIA 

HERCHAHTS 181 MIHEBS TRANS. CO. 



Accommodations and Cuisine unsurpassed. 
Complimentary side trip to Old Point. 
Send for illustrated Tour Book. 
Steamers leave Baltimore daily for the East. 
Forfurther information address W. P. TURNER, 
Gen'l Pass. Agent, Baltimore. 

Chatham Beach Hotel 

Chatham, Mass., affords the finest shore bird shooting in 
New England, and being situated on a clean sand beach, one 
hundred feet from the Ocean, commands coolest breezes, fine 
view, good bathing, fishing, sailing, etc. Rates $2.50 per 
day; reduced rates for families. For further particulars 
apply to 



N. A. ELDRIDGE 



Chatham, Mass 



BEST FISHING At OUTLET HOUSE 



AND 



FINE HUNTING 



(Formerly Moosehead House), MOOSEHEAD, ME. 11 miles from Green- 
ville by C. P. R. R. or by Steamer. 

CHARLES. E. WILSON => Propr. 

New steamboat just bought to accommodate our guests. 
Earliest and latest Moosehead lake fishing is had here; also plenty of big game. House has been entirely refurnished ; 
rooms have hot and cold water and baths. Grounds nicely graded, tennis court, croquet grounds and many fine 
woods roads laid out. Fishermen can avoid expense of guide by coming here, although we mrni.-h guides, boats and 
canoes when desired. Several camps in our " string," all snug and .attractive. Rates #2.00 to $250 per day. De- 
scriptive Booklet sentf ree. 



• • * < 

IV111 



RECREATION. 




Received the Marble pocket axe. It is a 
beauty, more than meeting my expectations. 
This makes the third prize received from 
you, representing altogether a cash value 
of $58.50. The first was an Al Vista cam- 
era; the second a Racine canoe. 

W. W. Mackey, Franklin, Pa. 



For Sale : 22 C. F. Winchester single 
shot Rifle, 600 cartridges and reloading 
tools, almost new. 32 Marlin Rim and C. 
F, Repeater, new, and 32 Smith & Wesson 
Hammerless Revolver. P. O. Box 156, Mt. 
Carmel, 111. 



REMARKABLE OFFERS 

To every person who will send Recrea- 
tion $1 for 1 year's subscription to be 
placed to my credit I will give as a premium 
a choice of a Nickel Plated Match Safe, or 
a Gilt Metal Match Safe, or a Hard Rubber 
Water Proof Match Safe, each listed at 
40 cents; or a Nickel Dog Whistle and 
pocket drinking cup, listed at 50 cents; 
or a Nail Clipper, with file and Nail 
Clipper attached, listed at 40 cents; or 
a 25 yard Single Action Reel, listed at 40 
cents ; or a 25 yard Water Proof Silk Line, 
listed at 50 cents. 

For 2 subscriptions a Hunting Knife, 
Stag Handle, Blade s J A inches long, listed 
at $1. 

For 3 subscriptions a Patent Double Min- 
now Bucket, listed at $2; or a 60 yard 
Multiplying Reel, listed at $2; or a 3-piece 
Bamboo Rod, 7 or 9 feet long, listed at $2; 
or a Heavy Silk Watch Fob, listed at $1.50. 

For 5 subscriptions a fancy striped Ham- 
mock, listed at $3; or a Hunting Knife, 
listed at $3 ; or a Tackle Box, listed at $3. 

For 9 subscriptions a field glass listed at 
$6. 

Only a limited number of subscriptions 
can be accepted on these offers. 

E. W. Jacobs, Coshocton, Ohio. 



Polo and Saddle Ponies 

Thoroughbred Dogs and Poultry 

VALLEY FARMS - - SIMSBURY, CONN. 

I am a subscriber to Recreation, as well 
as to nearly a dozen other sportsmen's peri- 
odicals. While a few refuse to indorse the 
method of roasting that you employ, it has 
my support at least. I notice also that 
some writers of articles to the daily press 
use terms that lead me to believe Recrea- 
tion has left its ear-marks on either them or 
their friends. You are doing great things 
for the cause of game protection. I wish 
you a long life in the work you have un- 
dertaken, but I trust, at the same time, it 
may not take you a lifetime to accomplish 
it. Redfood, Redlands, Cal. 



EVERY TRUE SPORTSMAN 



Needs a Course 

in Taxidermy 



OUR SCHOOL FILLS THIS NEED. SPORTSMEN, GUNNERS, ALL LOVERS OF NATURE 
— we can teach you to mount all kinds of birds, animals, reptiles, fishes, head and antlers, in fact, 
we teach the whole subject of Taxidermy by mail with remarkable" success. Nothing is more 
beautiful for den or office than well mounted natural specimens. 

We Tell You How to Pay All Gun and Sporting Expenses 

If you shoot and cannot save your specimens, you are losing the best part of field sports. 
Tuition reasonable. We are the originators of Taxidermy Schools. We want every reader of 
Recreation to have our literature — FREE. Write us today, before you forget it; a postal card 
will do. Mention Recreation. Yours for true sportsmanship, ( 

THE NORTHWESTERN SCHOOL OF TAXIDERMY, Omaha, Nebraska 

The Original and Only School of Its Kind 



RECREATION. 



lix 



ideal . paper SHOT SHELLTRIMMER 

SOMETHING NEW. 

With it you can cut off the soft and 
frayed ends of shells that have been 
fired and they will be as good as 
new. Why throw good shells 
away ? Send us 6 cents in stamps for 
latest IDEAL HAND BOOK, 
giving full information of all New 
Goods and much matter of interest 
to shooters. Address, 




IDEAL MANUF'G CO., 12 U Stjew Haven,Gonn.,U.S.A. 



THE PHIL. B. BEKEART CO., of San Francisco, Cal., Agents for Pacific Coast. 

When you write please mention Recreation. 



BROWNIE" RIFLE 




SIHPLE, DURABLE, RELIABLE, 

AND EXTREMELY ACCURATE. 

Popular with the Boys because of its Supe= 
rior Shooting Qualities, Light Weight, and 
Special Features of Construction 

Furnished in 22 caliber only. Weight \% to \)i pounds. It is supplied by Recreation as a Premium. 

Write for Catalogue 

The W. H. Davenport Fire Arms Co., Norwich, Conn. 



PITTED ARMS AREN'T ACCURATE 

Wick Plugs prevent Pits and Rust 

Rifle — 30 to 50 caliber, 75c. each postpaid. 

Shotgun — 10 to 20 gauge, $1.00 each, 

$1.75 per pair, postpaid. Give length and gauge. 




HEMM & WOODWARD, Sidney, 0. 

Write for descriptive circulars. Mention Recreation. 



WANTED 

Every owner of a shot gun to learn all about our handy little 

Target Trap. 

A Card Brings the Information 



Mention Recreation. 



THE MITCHELL MFG. CO., London, Ohio 



lx 



RECREATION. 




• $IOO 

{list 
ITHACA 



J GUARANTEED to b3 worth $25.00 
@ more than any other make 

of Gun at Same Cost. 
Send for Cs^taJogue Describing Sixteen 
Different Grades of Guns, Ranging in 
Price from $19.50 to $300. 



NITRO 
BREECH 

OWING NEW 

CROSS BOLT 

ITHACA GUN CO., Ithaca, N. Y. i 

Mention Recreation. w 




We make a specialty of Featherweights 
and Trap Guns with our new 
SINGLE TRIGGER 




Send stamp 
for 1903 Catalogue 
Mention Recreation 

D. M. LEFEVER SONS & CO., 

Manufacturers of the "NEW LEFEVER*' 
Not connected with Lefever Arms Co. SYRACUSE, N. Y. 



Guarantetd 
Perfect 

Our New 
Perfect 
Gun Cleaner 
By Mail, 
30 Cents 



THE BAKER 



THE GUN 
THAT'S SAFE 



50 DURABLE TOO 

IT LASTS A 

LIFETIME 




If you want to be right up in the front rank of style and efficiency shoot one of orr 
Special Paragons with Whitworth or Krupp fluid steel barrels. We have other patterns 
also that would pleise you. Our "Quarterly" tells about them and other matters that 
would interest you. We will send it to you free a^ear if you want it. 

BAKER GUN & FORGING CO., 42 Liberty Street, Batayia, N. Y. 



RECREATION. 



1X1 



AUG 

Every sportsman knows the value of dry 
matches. They're always a comfort; 
sometimes they save lives. 

THE BECBEATION 
WATEDPBOOF MATCHBOX 

is the only waterproof matchbox ever offered 
sportsmen which is worth pocket room. 

It is substantially made from brass, heavily- 
nickeled, and holds enough matches to keep a 
man in smokes and fires for several days. 

I lICC Ov/ Ceni.Sa everywhere- or 

Marble Safety Axe Co., Gladstone, Mich. 

Marble's Safety Pocket Axes. g efl( j j of 

Marble's Automatic Gaff Hook. Catalogue A 
Marble's Compass and Bracket. FREE 

Marble's Ideal Hunting Knife. 



size |lsU 






Shows 

box 

closed 






EM LSCOTEOflD-CHICAOQl 



Practical Common Sense 
in 6 Sizes. 




CAMP 
STOVE 

Either with 



or 
without oven. The 
lightest, strongest , 
most compact, prac- 
tical sti ve made. 
Cast combination 
sheet steel top, 
smooth outside, 
heavy lining in fire 
Dox and around oven, holds its shape, telescopic pipe 
carried inside the stove. Burns lareer wood and keeps 
fire longer than any other. Used by over 9,000 campers 
and only one stove leturned. 

For catalogue giving lull particulars, mention Rec- 
reation and address, 

P. W. CREE, Manufacturer, Griggsville, III. 



A Broken 

Hunting Knife. 






A few days ago the newspapers told the story of the 
discovery of the skeleton of a man— evidently a hunter— 
who perished in a hand to hand fight with a bear because 
his hunting knife broke. 

Marble's Safety Pocket Knife 

cannot break. It Is hand forged from the best selected 
steel. Folds when not in use, yet locks perfectly rigid when 
open— not a toy, but a knife to stake a life on. Price $4.00 
from all dealers or direct from, the manufacturers. 
Send for catalogue A. 
MARBLE SAFETY AXE CO., GLADSTONE, MICH. 




7902 Model 

LEATHER -COVERED Pneu- 
matic Recoil Pad is now per- 
fect. No pump, no valve, no 
recoil, no flinch, no headache, 
no bruised shoulders, no 
money if not satisfactory and 
returned at once. PRICE $2* 

J. R. WINTERS 
Clinton, Mo. 



THE 



PARKER 

AUTOMATIC 
EJECTOR 




The Latest attachment to 

The "OLD 
RELIABLE" 



New York Salesroom, Send for Catalogue. PARKER BROS., 
32 WARREN $T, Mention Recreation. Meriden, Conn. 



lxii 



RECREATION. 



H. (El R.. 



"Bicycle 

Hammerless" 

Revolver 




Description 

32 Caliber, 5 shot. 2 Inch Barrel. Weight, 12 ounces. 
C. F., S. & W. Cartridge. Finish, Nickel or Blue. 

IMPOSSIBLE TO CATCH on the pocket and discharge accidentally, 
ABSOLUTELY SAFE. Although designed for cyclists, this revolver 
is equaJly adapted to all cases where a small, light weight, effective 
atnd handy pocket weapon is desired* It has small frame and auto= 
matic ejector. Sold direct where dealers will not supply. 

HARRINGTON & RICHARDSON ARMS CO. 



Makers o! H. * R. SINGLE GUNS 



Cek.tsi.log for Postal 
Dept. R. 



WORCESTER. 




MAUSER 8m-m and 9m-m 

High Power Rifles* Suitable for Large 
Game Shooting 




Made by J. P. Sauer & Sohn and V. C. Schilling 

Prices, $25.00 to $50.00 

SCHOVERLING t DALY & GALES 



302=304 Broadway, 



New York 



Specialty Catalogue mailed on receipt of Five Cents. 



RECREATION. 



lxiii 



" HOPKINS & ALLEN " 

Single Barrel Shot Guns 

(Made for any powder and good for any shot.) 




Our " Lever Action " has more friends than any single gun made, has stood the 
test of fifteen years' continued approval. Simple, durable and reliable, 
12 and 16 gauge blued steel barrel $$.00 




Our new model top snap action, combining all up-to-date features of a modern 
gun, including patent compensating snap fore end. Automatic shell 
ejector, F\ill Choke Bored. 12, 16 and 20 gauge decarbonized 
steel barrel $9.00 

12 and 16 gauge Stubbs twist steel barrel $10.00 

We will ship, all charges prepaid, on receipt of remittance 
with order, to any express office in the U. S. A. 

The Hopkins & Allen Arms Co., 

NORWICH, CONN., U. S. A. 



lxiv 



RECREATION. 




Are You an 

Amateur 

Photographer? 




so ■would you like a Camera 
that will photograph 



f mountains 
river 



A whole sweep 
A whole army 
A whole fleet of 
A whole city 

Or any other vast stretch of seesaety ®f moving 1 
objects? THE SWING LENS DOES IT 





g, It lists at $30. 



tone ©f the g 
riven as a 1 



n 12 §ss : 




23 West 24th Street 



NEW YORK CITY 






RECREATION. 



Ixv 



Any 
One of the 



Guaranteed NOT to Shoot Loose. 



9 



ii 



S Y RACUSE 



ft 



Built for Business. 



Whether Grade "OO " listing at $30.00 
or Grade " D » listing at $475.00. 



Made in 
J0-J2-J6 and 20 Gauge 




HAVE tlie STRONG shooting qualities that has brought 

the " SYRACUSE » into such PROMINENCE. 
The careful INSPECTION and ATTENTION to detail 
that has gained for the " SYRACUSE " the name of the 

" THOROUGH-BRED " 

The EXQUISITE lines The SUPERB balance 

that denotes the work of the Master Crafts-man. 

BUILT BY 

SYRACUSE ARMS CO., 

SYRACUSE. N. Y. 

"SYRACUSE CATS" are TAME CATS and yours for the asking. 

Mention Recreation. 



lxvi 



RECREATION. 



WORLDS 
^STANDARD 





Putman Boots. 

Go o n I ike a g I ove &»# f i t ia 1 1 o ven 



"^ 



For a Quarter of a Century Putman Boots have been the Stand- 
ard among Western Hunters, Prospectors, Ranchmen and Engineers (who 
demand the best) and we have learned through our personal contact 
with them how to make a perfect boot. 

Putman Boots are in use in nearly every civilized country in the 
World. They are Genuine Hand Sewed, Water proof, Made to measure, 
Delivery charges prepaid, and cost no more than others. Send for Cat- 
alogue of over 30 different styles of boots. Also Indian Tanned 
Moosehide Moccasins. We send with catalogue Order Blanks show- 
ing how to measure your foot. We have in our files thousands of letters similar to the following. 

Gentlemen: — Please send me another cat- 
alogue. We are all wearing Putman Boots and 
find them far superior to any other boot. I have 
ordered about 20 pairs for friends here during 
the past three years, and every pair has given 
perfect satisfaction, and I feel that I have done 
a man a favor when I have recommended your 
goods to him. Respectfully, 

W. H. Fluker, Gen. Mgr, 

(Columbia Mining Co.) 

Tatham, Ga. 

Gentlemen: — I have just returned from a 
duck hunt in Colleton Co, this state, and though 
I tramped through the marshes for six days and 
a part of the nights , sinking in mud and water 
nearly to the tops of the shoes I got from you, 
my feet kept dry throughout the trip and the 
shoes were as soft at the wind-up as at the be- 
gining. I can cheerfully recommend your shoes 
to all sportsmen. Yours respectfully, 
C. F. Dill, 

Greenville, S. C. 

Gentlemen:— Was fishing through the 
ice on the Flathead River this week stand- 
ing for hours in wet snow and slush and 
tramping through the mountains, and 1 
found the boots you built for me in De- 
cember to be thoroughly water and snow 
proof, and quite warm. Yours truly. 

L. R. Fogle, Great falls, Mont. 

Illustration shows 
No. 900, 14 inch 
Boot, made to mea- 
sure and delivered 
in U. S. for 





H. J. PUTMAN & CO., 



•• HENNEPIN 
AVE. 



$7.50. 



Minneapolis. Minn, 



1=7, 






' W-. 



. PEERLESS 
DRIED BEE!: 



For Dainty Luncheons 

There is nothing so tempting and satisfying as Libby's 
Luncheon Meats. There are many delicious ways Libby's 
Peerless Dried Beef, Potted and Deviled Ham, Chicken 
Loaf and Veal Loaf can be served indoors and outdoors. 

Lifaby'S (Natural Flavor) FOOCI PrO<l\lCtS 

Send for our book, "How to Make Good Things to Eat." 
Libby's Atlas of the World sent postpaid for five 2c stamps. 

Libby, McNeill * Libby 



Chicago 



CHARLES FRANCIS PRESS, NEW YORK 



e*o 



x 

CD 



LO 



CU 
CD 



C3 
CD 



THE MAN 
BEHIND 

THE 
SAVAGE 



v:<;f s 



r THE supreme confi- 
*■ dence users of Sav- 
age Rifles feel when 
hunting big game re- 
sults in the most suc- 
cessful shots. There is 
no nervousness over the 
chance of your rifle mis- 
firing, clogging or shoot- 
ing inaccurately. Why 
the most famous hunters 
of large and dangerous 
game pin their faith to a 
Savage is not due to any 
matter of sentiment — 
they know by actual ex- 
perience the superiority 
of the Savage System. 

Catalogue (,G) on re- 
quest. 

SAVAGE ARMS 
COMPANY 

Utica, N. Y., U. 5. A. 



.'''',', 



!■• 



BAKER & HAMILTON 

Pacific Coast Agents 
San Francisco and Sacra- 
mento, Cal. 






LO 



CD 



CD 

OS 
CD 




Think 
Money 



BIG MONEY MAKERS 
THINK MONEY 

A strong, well-fed and well-nour- 
ished brain is absolutely essential. 

The brain food GRAPE-NUTS was 
made for a purpose. 

It was made by a skilled food expert. 

It does what it is intended to do. 
You can get certain results by a steady 
use of GRAPE-NUTS. 

The food for thought 



IF QUALITY COUNTS 

IT'S 




YOU WANT. 




YOUR GROCER HAS It 



vose 



F~\f A TVT/"\ & have been established over 50 YEARS. By our si 

r*^l /\ 1^ V 3^^ tem °^ payments every family in moderate circug 

* mx ~ ^r^S stances can own a VOSE piano. We take old instj 

ments in exchange and deliver the new piano in your home free of expeir 

Write for catalogue D and explanations. 

VOSE & SONS PIANO CO., 160 Boylston St., Boston, Mi 






VOLUME XIX. 
NUflBER 2 



AUGUST, 1903 



$1.00 A YEAR 
10c. A COPY 




THE GIANT BROWN BEARS OF ALASKA; 



By J. A. LORING. Illustrated with Photos. 




There comes a time in the life of every 
individual when the vse of a stimulant 
is not only advisable but necessary 



AS you approach the calm and mellow evening of your life you 
have doubtless learned the value of a pure and wholesome 
cereal stimulant to sweeten solitude and keep off the blues. 

When choosing a stimulant for medicinal use or purpose of good 
cheer endeavor to obtain a mild soothing amiable fluid that does not 
inflame or excite, but gently stirs and quickens the life current. 

REGISTERED AND SPECIAL BRANDS 



Per Gal. 

Holiday Pure Rye - 4.00 

(Eleven Years Old) 

Hermitage Rock & Rye 4.00 

Superior 

Five pounds of rock candy crystals 
to each gallon of seven year old 
Hermitage Rye whiskey, is used in 
the preparation of our Celebrated 
Rock and Rye. 

Bon Ton Cocktails - 4.00 

Martini, Manhattan, Vermouth, 
Whiskey, Tom Gin and Holland 
Gin. Carefully prepared from the 
choicest materials, perfectly blended. 

Ruthven Sherry - 4.00 

From Duff, Gordon & Co. Warranted 
twenty years in the wood before 
bottling. Rich and fruity. 



Per Gal. 

Old Gold Bourbon - $4.00 

(Eleven Years Old) 

Jewel Port - 4.00 

From Silva & Cosens, Oporto. A 
choice product of the grape. 

Rainbow Brandy V.0. 4.00 

The product of one of the best Ameri- 
can Vineyards, with all the medici- 
nal qualities of French Brandy. 

Jupiter Gin - 4.00 

From the Swan Distillery, Schiedam, 
Holland, where Good Gin comes 
from. Tastes differ. Many people 
appreciate Good Gin. Jupiter is the 
best the world affords. 

Medford Old Rum - 4.00 

From Daniel Lawrence & Sons, Med- 
ford, Mass. 



On receipt of your order with $6.00, we will ship 6 full quarts 

assorted to suit, transportation charges prepaid, to any railroad point 
in the United States where the charges for transportation do not 
exceed #2.00. You cannot afford to let this chance go by. You 
never before had as good an offer. 

If you accept our offer you will surely receive the BEST and the 
flOST for your money that ever came to you from any similar propo- 
sition. 

Remit cash in registered letter or by express company or P. O. 
money order. 

References; Any bank in Boston. Any mercantile agency or 
any distiller of importance in the United States. 

W. H. JONES S V&JSSS81&. SB " 

ESTABLISHED 1851 



RECREATION 

Copyright, December, 1902, by G. O. Shields 



A Monthly Magazine Devoted to Everything the Name Implies 



'i.oo a Year. 

10 Cents a Copy 



G. O. SHIELDS (COQUINA), 
Editor and Manager. 



23 West 24TH Street, 

New York 



CONTENTS OF THIS NUMBER page 

The Bulls Stood Still and Gave Me a Chance for Another Shot Frontispiece. 

Hunting Blue Bulls in India. Illustrated .. W. H. Fee 85 

Loon Notes and Queries. Illustrated Robert J. Sim 89 

The Giant Brown Bears of Alaska. Illustrated J. A. Loring 91 

Tarpon Fishing at Pass Christian. Illustrated M. Snowden 95 

A Tragedy. Poem " A. L. Vermilya 96 

An Interesting Summer Boarder. Illustrated J. H. Fisher, Jr. 97 

In the Woods with Rod and Camera F. W. Halsey, M.D. 100 

A Trip for Trout. Illustrated Dr. J. S. Emans 103 

Tenderfeet in the Grand Disoharge Robert Froth ingh am 107 

Wild Sheep in Captivity. Illustrated Harry E. Lee 112 

The Battle of the Prong Horns W. T. Heddon 113 



From the Game Fields 115 

Fish and Fishing 127 

Guns and Ammunition 131 

Natural History 139 

The League of American Sportsmen . . 143 



Forestry 147 

Pure and Impure Foods 149 

Publisher's Notes 151 

Editor's Corner 152 

Amateur Photography 156 



Entered as Second-Class Matter at New York Post-Office, Oct, 17, iJ 




AA/ELLORESSEDMEN 



appreciate the great utility and 
comfort of 

WASHBURNE'S PATENT 

SCARF HOLDER 

Little but effective. It cannot come loose or 
ride up. Instantly attached and detached. 



Scarf Holder - 
Cuff Holders - - 
Key Ring and Chain 



10 Cents ) Sent 
20 " \ Pre- 
25 *' J paid. 



They never come loose. A tiny lever with 
a bulldog grip. Illustrated Catalogue Free. 

AMERICAN R.ING CO., Dept. 44 
Waterbury, Conn. 



Skin Diseases 

Eczema, Salt Rheum, Pimples, Ring- 
worm, Itch, Ivy Poison, Acne or other 
skin troubles, can be promptly cured by 

Hydrozone 

Hydrozone is endorsed by leading phy- 
sicians. It is absolutely harmless, yet 
most powerful healing agent, that cures 
by destroying the parasites which cause 
these diseases. 

Cures sunburn in 24 hours. In cases of 
Prickly Heat and Hives it will stop itch- 
ing at once, also will relieve mosquito 
bites instantly. Take no substitute and 
see that every bottle bears my signature. 

Tria.1 Size, 25 Cents. 

At Druggists or by ma.il, from 




ic u *cE& 



F— 59 Prince St., New York. 



FREE 



{Booklet on the rational treat- 
ment of diseases sent free. 



II 



RECREATION. 



Waltham Watches 

Known by their works. 

" The Perfected American Watch/' an illustrated -book 
of interesting information about watches, <zvitl be sent 
free upon request 

American Waltham Watch Company, 
Waltham, Mass. 




RECREATION. 



in 




'HE BOAT ©lS pictured below in cVery 
detail — length \5% feet, beam 4 feet, with 
% horse-power Blomstrom gasoline engine 



$100 



<*/*q simple a child can operate 
tetilh entire safety 

Catalogue D, including- Marine Gasoline Engines of from % 
to 80 horse-power at corresponding prices, free on request. 

THE C. H. BLOMSTROM MOTOR. CO. 

1284-1294 River Street, Detroit, MicK. 

(From the Chicago Jotirnai, May Jth). 
At last an honest soul has put a 15^ foot launch with gas- 
oline engine — 4 foot beam— within the reach of the masses. 



i 



v 




IV 



RECREATION. 



a 



NOTHING SO RARE AS RESTING ON AIR. 



ti 




TAKING MINE EASE. 



The only article in your outing outfit that you can use during the whole year is a 

Pneumatic Mattress 

OR CUSHION 



THE EVER PRESENT ROOT 

in the bed of boughs is a thing of the past if you 
use a Pneumatic Mattress. A mattress for 
home use that you can deflate, pack in your 
grip and take with you into camp. 



SPRUCE BOUGHS 

may make a fine bed. But the genuine Sports- 
man prefers a Pneumatic Mattress because he 
knows he can do three times the tramping the 
day following a night's good sleep. 




Sportsman's Cushion 

A Yoke to save your shoulders 

A Swimming Collar for those 
who can't swim. 

A Life Preserver in case of 
accident. 

A Cushion while waiting for 
Moose. 

A Cushion or Head Rest while 
waiting for Duck. 

A Protection for your shoulder 
if the gun is heavy. 

A Cushion for CAMP, BOAT, 
OFFICE or HOME. 




PRICE $2.00 
Carry it in your Pocket, it weighs just One Pound. 

Swimming Collar* 

Worn around the neck, leaving the arms 

free for action. Will support a full-grown 

man. Just the thing when learning to swim # 

Price, Small Size, $1.50 Large Size, $2.00 

Pneumatic Mattress 6 Cushion Company, 
2 R South Street, New York City. 




Swimming Collar. 



RECREATION. 




A 3 Ceift Bait 

in postage stamps will bring the biggest catch an angler, camper or 
sportsman can land — Abercrombie and Fitch's catalogue R, 160 pages, 
cuts and prices. 

We guarantee to furnish a more satisfactory fisherman's outfit than can 
be obtained elsewhere. 

Complete outfits for explorers, campers and prospectors. Camp outfits 
from the most modest and practical to the most complete and luxurious. 

Compare our prices on tents, clothing, cooking outfits, folding buckets, camp packs, cots, chairs, food bags, folding 
shelves, guns, boots, moccasins, sleeping bags, pack saddles, stoves, pneumatic beds, cushions, duffle bags, pack harness, 
folding bakers, folding lanterns, rolling tables, fishing tackle, shoes, covers, &c. 

314=316 BROADWAY, NEW VOPK CITV 



vi RECREATION. 



Decorate Your Den 

With a set of the most beautiful 

Hunting and Fishing Pictures 

ever made. 



15 Plates. Size for Framing, 18 x 24 inche 



SUBJECTS : 

ELK HUNTING SALMON FISHING 

MOOSE HUNTING TROUT FISHING 



I HY. SANDHAM 



MALLARD SHOOTING — BLACK BASS FISHING — c. e denton 



TARPON FISHING — BLUE FISHING — fred. s. cozzens 



ANTELOPE HUNTING — GOOSE SHOOTING — fred remington 



GROUSE SHOOTING — WILD TURKEY HUNTING — r. f. zogbaum 



MUSKALONGE FISHING — f. h. taylor 



BEER HUNTING - a. b. frost 



ROCKY MOUNTAIN SHEEP HUNTING — e. knobel 



These 15 plates are lithographed in the true colors of nature and altogether 
make one of the finest series of pictures of outdoor sports ever published. 

ORIGINALLY ISSUED AT $50 A SET 

I have bought the last of them and can furnish a complete set for 1 5 yearly 
subscriptions to Recreation, 

Or will Sell at $10 a Set 



I also have enlargements of the following photographs : 

ROCKY MOUNTAIN GOATS 

Published on pages 90, 91, 92, and 93 of the February issue of Recreation^ 

$5 a set. 

WOOD BUCK SHOOTING 

Published on page 95 of the February issue of Recreation, $1.50 each. 

Address: RECREATION, 23 West 24th Street, New York City 



RECREATION. 



VI) 




In certain portions of Quebec, in British Columbia and other 
Canadian provinces, the law permits moose hunting in September. 
This is the month of the " hunter's moon," when the big bulls are 
on the go day and night — 

AND YOU SHOULD BE IN THE WOODS. 



"FISHING and SHOOTING" is a pamphlet issued by the 

CANADIAN PACIFIC RAIL 

that gives much useful information. 
YOU MAY HAVE IT FOR THE ASKING. 



ROBERT KERR, 



Passenger Traffic Manager, 



MONTREAL. 



Vlll 



RECREATION. 



— > 






elightful 
Comfort 

Nowhere can a person secure more real, de- 
lightful comfort on a railway journey than on the 
great trains over the Lake Shore and Michigan 
Southern Ry. 

And this is due to the equipment — always the 
best — excellence of road bed and nicety of 
track adjustment, features wherein it excels 
all others, and which make every mile one 
t v of comfort and pleasure. 

When you have occasion to 
travel between Chicago and J| 
Cleveland, Buffalo, New 
York and Boston, by using 
the Lake Shore you will se- 
\ - ' '* cure absolutely the best in 

travel that money can buy. 
■f For "Book of Trains" or 

! ' travel information, address 

A. J. SMITH, General Pass, and Ticket 
Agent, Cleveland, Ohio. 




Colorado 



AND RETURN 



First-class to Denver, Colorado Springs and Pueblo from 
Chicago, daily, throughout the summer, good returning 
October 31. Correspondingly low rates from other points. 



The Colorado 



fast daily train, one night to Denver from Chicago and the Central 
States (only two nights en route from the Atlantic seaboard), 
leaves Chicago daily 6.30 p. m. _^^^^_ 

A second daily train leaves Chicago 11.30 p. m. 
Personally conducted excursions in tourist sleep- 
ing cars. 

All agents sell tickets via this route. 

Write for particulars to W. B. Kniskern, P. T. M. 

C. & N.-W. Ry., Chicago. 



UNION 
PACIFIC 



Chicago, Union Pacific and 
North -Western Line 



im 



CS23 



^^^j^, 



RECREATION. 



IX 



THE 

FOUR-TRACK 

NEWS 

An Illustrated Magazine 
of Travel and Education 

MORE THAN ioo PAGES MONTHLY 
Its scope nnd character are indicated by the following 
titles ot articles that have appeared in recent issues: 

Picturesque Venezuela— Illus. . . Frederick A. Ober 
Haunts ot Eben Hidden — Illus . . Del B Salmon 
A Journey Amonsj the Stars — Illus. Frank W.Mack 
In the Great North Woods — Poem . Eben P>. Rext'oid 
Beautiful Porto Rico — Illustrated Hezekiah Kutterworth 
In Rip Van Winkle's Land — Poem . Minna Irving 
Nature's Chronometer — Illustrated . H. M. Albau^h 
Van Arsdale,The Platitudinarian-Ill. Chas. Battell Loomis 
The Three Oregons — Illustrated . . Alfred Holman 
Ancient Prophecies Fulfilled — Illus. Georee H. Daniels 
The Stories the Totems Tell— Illus. Luther L. Holden 
A Little Country Cousin— Illusti ated KathleeD L. Greig 
The Mazamas— Illustrated . . . Will G. Steel 
When Mother Goes Away— Poem . Joe Cone 
A Little Bit of Holland— Illustrated Clmles B, Wells 
The Romance of Reality— Illustrated Jane W. Guthrie 
Samoa and TuMiila— Hluftrated . Michael White 
Under Mexican Skies — Illustrated 
Niaeara in Winter— Illustrated . 
Little Histories — Illustrated 

Old Fort Putnam 

The Con'ederate White House 

The Alamo John K. Le Baron 

SINGLE COPIES 5 CENTS, or so CENTS a YEAR 

Can be had ot newsdealers, or by add. essing 

George H. Daniels, Publisher 

Room No. 48 7 East 42d Street, New York 



Marin B. Fenwick 
Onin E. Dunlap 

William J. Lampton 
Heroert Brooks 



"Free from the care which wearies and annoys, 
Where every hour brings its several joys." 



"AMERICA'S 

SUMMER 

RESORTS" 



This is one of the most complete pub- 
lications of its kind, and will assist 
those who are wondering wmefe they 
will go to spend, their vacation this 
summer. 

It contains a valuable map, in addi- 
tion to much interesting information re- 
garding resorts on or reached, by the 

NEW YORK CENTRAL LINES 



A copy will be sent free, postpaid, to any address on 
receipt of a two-cent stamp, by George H. Daniels, 
General Passenger Agent, New York Central & Hudson 
River Railroad, Grand Central Station, New York. 



" The King's Highway" 



TO THE 

GATEWAYS OF COMMERCE 

THROUGH THE 

CENTERS OF POPULATION, 

adding greatly to the interest of your 
journey, without increasing its ex- 
pense beyond what you would expect 
to pay for the "best," which you se- 
cure if you travel by the 



NEW YORK CENTRAL LINES 



A copy of "Four-Track Series" No. 13, " Urban Popu- 
lation in 1900," will be sent free, on receipt of a two-cent 
stamp by George H. Daniels, General Passenger Agent, 
New York Central & Hudson River R. R., Grand Cen- 
tral Station, New York. 



" The Nation's pleasure ground and sanitarium." 



THE 

ADIRONDACK 

MOUNTAINS. 



The lakes and streams in the Adiron- 
dack Mountains are full of fish, the 
woods are inviting, the air is rilled with 
health, and the nights are cool and rest- 
ful. If you visit this region once you 
wall go there again. An answer to al- 
most any question in regard to the 
Adirondacks will be found in No. 20 
of the " Four-Track Series," « The 
Adironacks and How to Reach Them;" 
issued by the 

NEW YORK CENTRAL 



A copy wdl be mailed free on receipt of a two-cent 
stamp, by George H. Daniels, General Passenger Agent, 
Grand Central Station, New York. 



X 



RECREATION. 




RECREATION. 



If the Dog Is Worth It 

You ought to have your Kennel enclosed with 

PAGE KENNEL FENCE 

It weighs 23 pounds to the rod, and is strong and 
handsome. If your dogs are not too large, our 58- 
inch Poultry Fence might answer/ It weighs io 
pounds to the rod and is as strong as some stock 
fences. The bottom wires are only 1% inches apart. 

We make Standard Fence for every kind of farm 
stock. Write for descriptions. 

Page Woven Wire Fence Co. 

Box 39, Adrian, Michigan 



No Picture 

can show you the good qualities of the Kenwood 
Sleeping Bag. You must see a complete combina- 
tion bag to understand how perfectly it is adapted to 
the use of every man who sleeps out of doors or in a 
tent, under all conditions of climate and weather. 

If your dealer does not have the Kenwood Sleep- 
ing Bag, write us for samples, prices and full informa- 
tion, then decide which quality you want and order it 
on approval. If it does not suit you in every way return 
it. We pay charges both ways. Don't buy any other 
sleeping bag or blankets before you have seen the 
Kenwood. 

THE KENWOOD MILLS 

ALBANY, N. Y. 



Xll 



RECREATION. 




" ■ —-'- ' - . --. :' '■ ■ 



" : 'C ...... 




iooo island Rouse 



In the midst of the "Thousand Islands," 
the so-called "Venice of America," and 
really the most charming and delight- 
ful Summer Resort on the Continent. 



Send me two 2-cent stamps and I will send you a beauti- 
fully illustrated guide book. Mention Recreation. 

O. G. STAPLES, Owner and Proprietor 



Alexandria Day, n. V. 



RECREATION. 



xm 



& 



» 



I 



V & "* 



SLftl" Slt§ 



SiT*^ 1 



"Hft 



Iffer 



f *«r; 



***■ ■ ■ 



J**.-,:*' 



%?v 



;-^ii?^lHfei*» 



ffIGffLAAr£>S 

Ontajrio 



~-i\ 



•■1.000 FEET ABOVE SEA LEVEL. 

MOST CHARMING SUIVIMEf 
R ES O R TS I N A N\ E R I C A 

. - :'!NCL0.DSN.G'. ' . 

MUSKOKA LAKES 

LAKE OF BAYS 

M AGN ETAWAN RIVER 

30, 000 ISLA H DS o r G EORG I A 
BAY 

KAWARTHA LAKES 

LAKES SIMCOE 

. and CpUCHrCHING • 

LAKE NIPiSSfNG 

amd F.R E JM C H R I V E R 



H 



■ ,■', ■ V'.i. . '".'<•/' 



Access, , Pesr 
Goo» HoTEi 

" R&te* to St 



The ROYAL MUSKOKA' 

FINEST SUMMER HOTEL IN CANAD/ 



"•■ -'• 



t} ' ' "iV ' 






cO'ir'ir'' 

£1. ;.'.:■.»;-•» mmm mmm 



I LLUSTRATEC 

PUBLICATIONS 

CAN BE -HAO-FROM GRAND TRUNK RAILWAY 
f. SYSTEM..'. ADDRESS N EAREST OFFICE.' 



OR TO G. T. BELL, 
MONTREAL, CANADA. 

'.MENTION THIS IWACAIINt. ,.-.,. 



XIV 



RECREATION. 



"FOR 34 YEARS A STANDARD PIANO." 

The Wing Piano 



VHT T TMFFD THT^ "ROOK" IF YOU intend to buy a piano, a book 

±\J\J IN I A t i^f 11J.1L> U\J\J1^. —not a catalogue— that gives you all the informa- 
tion possessed by experts. It makes the selection of a piano easy. If read carefully, it will make you 
a judge of tone, action, workmanship and finish ; will tell you how tp know good from bad. It de- 
scribes the materials used ; gives pictures of all the different parts, and tells how they should be made 
and put together. It is the only book of its kind ever published. It contains 116 large pages, and is 
named "The Book of Complete Information About Pianos." We send it free to anyone wishing 
to buy a piano. Write for it. 

CA\7Th 17D rMUT <tffin TO OHO We make the WING PIANO and sell it our- 
0/\V.C rjXAJlVl $\\J\J L\J $A\J\J selves. It goes direct from our factory to 
your home. We do not employ any agents or salesmen. When you buy the WING PIANO you pay 
the actual cost of construction and our small wholesale profit. This profit is small because we sell 
thousands of pianos yearly. Most retail stores sell no more than twelve to twenty pianos yearly, and 
must charge from |ioo to f 200 profit on each. They can't help it. 




A Wing style — 45 other styles to select from. 

cryrVTT OM TOT AT we pay freight, no money in advance, wewiii 

OEJ.N 1 WIN I IVl/M^ send any WING PIANO to any part of the United States on 
trial. We pay freight in advance and do not ask for any advance payment or deposit, If the oiano is 
not satisfactory after twenty days' trial in your home, -we take it back entirely at our expense. You pay 
us nothing unless you keep the piano. There is absolutely no risk or expense to you. 

Old instruments taken in exchange. EASY MONTHLY PAYJIENTS. 

INSTRUMENTAL ATTACHMENT £Sfk f TSe°s f £5SS 

the tones of the mandolin, guitar, harp, zither and banjo. 

IN 34 YEARS 33,000 PIANOS 



We refer to over 33,000 satisfied purchasers 

in every part of the United States. WING 

PIANOS are guaranteed for twelve years against any defect in tone, action, workmanship or material. 

Are just as carefully made as Wing Pianos. They have a sweet, 
powerful, lasting tone, easy action, very handsome appearance, need 
no tuning. Wing Organs are sold direct from the factory, sent on CfclSalj are sold on easy monthly 
payments. For catalogue and prices write to 



WING ORGANS 



WING & SON, 



226 and 228 East J2th St*, 
NEW YORK. 



J868— 35th Year-J903. 






RECREATION. 



xv 



POLK MILLER DRUG GO. 

IS SYNONYMOUS WITH 

DOG REMEDIES. 

SERGEANT'S CONDITION PILLS have to do especially 

with the health of a dog. 
Every dog should be in a healthful state- just as much so as a person. 
You can't expect a dog to work right in the field, stud or bench 

show if he is ailing. He is bound to ail; just as much as human 

beings, and they you know, are always ailing — either through neg-» 

lect, change, confinement, accident or over- work. 

You will find a dog bothered just as much as a person when it comes 
to sickness 

SERGEANT'S CONDITION PILLS do for a dog what thousands of 
good remedies do for a man — they cure. 

They will cure the dog of Indigestion, Nervousness, General DebiU 
ity, Sleeplessness, Fretfulness, Meanness, Chills, Fever, Ague, 
Mange, Distemper, Chronic Dyspepsia, Anaemia, Catarrh, Short 
Sightedness, and Loss of Scent. 
SERGEANT'S CONDITION PILLS build a dog up. 
They put life into a dog, eradicate all weariness, physic and strengthen 
him. 
The only difference in this medicine for dogs and that made for man 

is, that it is made of a formula stronger in its ingredients, for, when it 
comes to medicine a dog can stand more than man* 

SERGEANT'S CONDITION PILLS cost 50c. and $1.00 per box at 

Druggists or by mail (prepaid) from 

POLK MILLER DRUG CO., 

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA, BOX 217. 

There isn't anywhere a dog lovor or owner who wouldn't like 

to have our 48 page Treatise 
on Dogs. We will send 
it and a Pedigree Blank to 
any address for 3 cents in 
stamps, which go to 
pay the postage. 



\/JL 



£25 



XVI 



RECREATION. 






*M^ J0^ «S^ «M^ «&^ ^^ «Ml^ «M^ «&^ ^^ «&*& *&^ *&}& «&}*> «&)*> «&*> 






S&v fir* 






1^ 







»* 

%- 
%< 



Far-famed Miami Va 



Government statistics prove that the Miami Valley in Ohio produces 
better grain and has purer water than any other section of this country. It 
is Nature's garden. Right in the heart of this favored spot is our distill- 
ery. We have at our very door the two essentials for producing the finest 
whiskey in the world—the best grain and the purest water. Add to these 
one of the most completely equipped distilleries ever operated and an ex- 
perience of 37 years in distilling whiskey and you have a combination that 
is unequaled anywhere. That's why HAYNER WHISKEY is the best for medi- 
cinal and other uses. That's why we have nearly half a million satisfied 
customers. That's why YOU should try it. Don't forget that it goes 
direct from our own distillery to you, with all its original strength, rich- 
ness and flavor, carries a UNITED STATES REGISTERED DISTILL- 
ER'S GUARANTEE of PURITY and AGE and saves the dealers' enor- 
mous profits. Your money back if you're not satisfied. 

HAYNER 
WHISKEY 

FULL QUARTS $ 






31 



W 






$% 









&* 
??&< 



*J 






**& 



3* 






I* 




EXPRESS CHARGES PAID BY US. 



ft! ID ft EC ED We wil1 send you F0UR FyLL QUABT B0TTLES ot HAY * 

tSUif Ul 8 ttfa NER S SEVEN-YEAR-OLD RYE for $3.20, and we will pay 

the express charges. Try it and if you don't find 
it all right and as good as you ever used or can buy from anybody else at any 
price, then send it back at our expense and your $3.20 will be returned to you by 
next mail. Just think that offer over. How could it be fairer? If you are not 
perfectly satisfied you are not out a cent. Better let us send you a trial order/ 
If you don't want four quarts yourself, get a friend to join you. We ship in a 
plain sealed case, no marks to show what's inside. Write oar nearest office NOW. 

Orders for Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho . Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, 
Utah, Washington or Wyoming must be on the basis of 4 Quarts for $4.00 by EXPRESS 
PREPAID or 20 Quarts for $16.00 by FREIGHT PREPAID. 




ESTABLISHED 
1866. 



THE HAYNER DISTILLING COMPANY, 



DISTILLERY, 
TROY, OHIO. 



HJOTNER'S 

SEVEN YEAB OLD 

S^YNERDISTILUND^ 

^OlSriLLERSvT I 



DAYTON, OHIO. ST. LOUIS, MO. ST. PAUL, MINN. ATLANTA, GA. 










•**^bs 



niftiiMiiif"' 




THE BULLS STOOD STILL AND GAVE ME A CHANCE FOR ANOTHER SHOT. 

84 



Volume XIX. 



RECREATION 

AUGUST, 1903. 
G. 0. SHIELDS, (COQUINA) Editor and Manager 



Number 2* 



HUNTING BLUE BULLS IN INDIA. 



W. H. FEE. 



One Sunday evening in February, 
when the Ahmedabad mail train 
pulled out of the Bombay terminus, 
behind a good American locomotive, 
I was one of the passengers. My 
destination was Godhra, and 'visions 
of deer, the woods and the fields were 
rising before my eyes. Godhra is an 
Indian town of about 20,000 inhabi- 
tants, 350 miles North of Bombay, 
and 90 or 100 miles Southeast of Ah- 
medabad. The next morning, after 
having changed cars at Anand Junc- 
tion, I reached Godhra at 10 o'clock. 
Mr. Robert Ward met me at the sta- 
tion. He was to be my host and had 
promised me some good shooting. 

The following morning we packed 
such things as we should need for 
4 or 5 days and took the train for 
Nadiad, where we were to start out 
on camels and try our luck on the 
nilghai. The nilghai, or nilghau, Por- 
tax tragocamchis, is one of the lar- 
gest of antelopes, having much the 
character of an ox, the horns, head 
and muzzle of an antelope, the flat, 
compressed neck of a horse, a thin, 
erect mane, and a singular, beardlike 
tuft of stiff hair growing out of the 
middle of its throat. Its forelegs are 
somewhat longer than the hindlegs, 
and its withers rise so much as to give 
it the appearance of having a hump. 
The color of the females, and of the 
males until full grown, is a light 
brown. The bucks, after attaining 
their full growth, turn to a deep, 
slatey blue, which gives them their 
name, the Persian nilghai meaning 
blue bull. 

We were up not much later than old 



Sol the next day. After a hasty 
breakfast, we mounted the camels, 
Mr. Ward and I on one, and 4 men 
on 2 others. When we had followed 
the main road 10 miles, we branched 
off and traveled a mile or so through 
the fields. The average Indian field is 
about an acre in area and is surround- 
ed by cactus hedges. When there was 
an opening the camel was steered 
toward it, but when there was an en- 
trance but no exit, the hedge had to 
be cut by a man with a bill hook, 
which is a curved knife 15 or 16 
•inches long, fastened in the end of a 
short bamboo pole. Once, when we 
were waiting near a 3-foot fence for 
a man to come and cut it, Ward drove 
the camel close to the hedge, and with 
a kick and a nudge with a stick he 
made the beast jump over. As I was 
not aware of the accomplishments of 
his camel, I came near rolling off 
backward when the huge beast raised 
his forelegs, and when he put them 
down on the other side I did my best 
to go over Ward Sahib's head. 

We had had news as to the where- 
abouts of a herd of nilghai, and it was 
not long before a man came up to tell 
us there were 4 bulls in a field half 
a mile distant. The camel was made 
to jee, or kneel, and taking our rifles, 
Ward a .45 and la .303, we went 
after the blue bulls. With the assist- 
ance of friendly hedges, we were able 
to get within 100 yards of the wary 
animals. 

Bang ! A miss ! and a punch in the 
ribs from my friend. The bulls, not 
being able to see anything, as we were 
well shielded by a big hedge, and the 



85 



86 



RECREATION. 



powder was smokeless, stood still and 
gave me a chance for another shot, 
which did not follow the bad example 
of the first, but hit my quarry in the 
shoulder. Then, of course, the others 
made off, leaving the wounded bull in 
the next field, bleeding at the mouth. 
Another shot finished him, when his 
throat was cut. He was a beauty, 
weighing at least 400 pounds. He 
was left to the care of some of our 
men, who cut him up and packed him 
on another camel. 

Then we started after the remain- 
der of the herd. They had gone a 
mile before stopping and we had more 
difficulty in getting up to them than 
we had the first time. As we were 
just getting in a good shooting posi- 
tion, off they went half a mile farther. 
At last we got close enough for me to 
fire again. The bull shook, and I was 
almost certain I had him ; but he 
pulled himself together and started off 
like a streak. Soon he left the other 
2, so we followed him. Although he 
was badly hit he still was equal to any 
hedge he met, clearing it neatly. As 
Mr. Ward was a resident of the coun- 
try, he generally let me have first 
shot, and a calling down if I missed. 
We each hit the wounded bull once 
more, and then lost track of him. 

It was midday and we were hot and 
thirsty, so we stopped under a tree 
and had a lunch. Then the camels 
came up, together with our men, and 
some other natives, who had been our 
informants. As we sat there under 
the tree, the natives in that vicinity 
who had heard the shots, and who 
only get a chance to see a sahib about 
once a year, came up and sat down to 
watch us. Just before leaving I 
counted 75 of the curious people, sit- 
ting round us in a circle, on their 
haunches. 

One would suppose that with the 
population of India there would be 
little game. However, the Hindoos 
are forbidden by their religion to kill 
any animal. Often when they find a 
scorpion in their houses they will 



carefully pick it up with a stick and 
carry it into the fields. Naturally 
they are vegetarians, except some of 
the lower castes, who eat anything. 
In consequence of the doctrines of 
their religion, there are some who do 
not like to see the sahibs kill the nil- 
ghai ; but others, whose crops have 
been damaged by the animals, are 
willing they should be killed, and will 
help to do it, by giving information, 
etc. 

After we had finished our lunch, 
and were thinking what was best to 
be done next, a man came in with 
news of the bull we had wounded. 
However, when we arrived where he 
had been seen, we found that some 
rascally natives, of the anti-kill va- 
riety, had chased him away. Reluc- 
tantly we abandoned the chase, feeling 
sorry to leave him to his fate so badly 
wounded. 

Mounting the camels, we struck off 
toward a neighboring village, where 
orders had been left for something to 
eat. At this village we had curried 
chicken and rice, to eat with our fin- 
gers, native fashion. We got these 
eatables from some natives who had 
been converted by the missionaries, 
and who seemed to be in better cir- 
cumstances and more intelligent than 
the average villager. After resting, 
we rode 10 miles back to Nadiad, 
where we arrived after dark ; hungry, 
tired, but happy. 

The camel is a fearful beast to ride ; 
a continual jolt, jolt, jolt. The saddle 
is made for 2, tandem fashion, with 
the hump in the middle. The camel is 
a pacer, and his steady jog for a 
dozen miles causes the rider to be 
aware that he has a pair of shoulders 
and a back. 

The next day a hind quarter of the 
blue bull was forwarded to Bombay, 
and we went on to Umreth, a town 
between Anand Junction and Godhra. 
There we spent 2 days, and Mr. 
Ward's turn came. He brought down 
a fine young buck, full grown but not 
yet turned dark in color. The buck 



HUNTING BLUE BULLS IN INDIA. 



87 



looked like a large female with horns. 
Our experiences at Umreth were simi- 
lar to those near Nadiad. The country 
was more open, and the weather grew 
hotter. We rode the camels till we 
either got news of the nilghai or hap- 
pened to see them. If the latter, we 
dismounted and sent the camel on 
with a man. The nilghai would 
watch the camel and thus enable us 
to stalk better. 

As the native never kills the blue 
bull, the animals get used to him and 



are not frightened at his approach. 
The hunter must be careful where he 
shoots, as he is likely to kill a native, 
thereby getting himself in trouble, 
which may cost him many rupees. 

From Umreth we returned to God- 
hra, where I spent the rest of my time 
among the waterfowl on Godhra lake, 
an artificial body of water, construct- 
ed by native labor during the recent 
famine of 1900. I then returned to 
Bombay, tanned like a native, having 
been in the jungle 2 weeks. 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY T, J. CUKKi 

A MOONLIGHT SAIL. 



Highly Commended in Recreation's 7th Annual Photo Competition, 




NEST OF RUFFED GROUSE. 
One of the 17th Prize Winners in Recreation's 7th Annual Photo Competition. 





A SUN BATH. A DUET. 

One of the 17th Prize Winners in Recreation's One of the 17th Prize^ Winners in Recreation's 



7th Annual Photo Competition. 



7th Annual Photo Competition. 




RIGHT DRESS 



ATEUR PHOTOS BY JAMES H. MILLER. 



One of the 17th Prize Winners in Recreation's 7th Annual Photo Competition. 

88 



LOON NOTES AND QUERIES. 

ROBERT J. SIM. 

Illustrated by the Author. 



Birds of the order Pygopodcs, have long 
had a great fascination for me. The diving 
birds which have been found in this coun- 
try, to my certain knowledge, are the great 
Northern diver, or common loon, the red- 
throat loon, the horned grebe, and the 
piedbill grebe. During the autumn migra- 



ponds, where it sometimes associates with 
a coot or 2. 

In November, 1901, during a short stay 
at the lake, I spent manv hours watching a 
horned and a piedbill grebe. They were 
feeding together on a sluggish stream 
which comes "from the haunts of the coot 




GREAT NORTHERN DIVER. 



tion the horned grebe, in sober dress, is 
common on lake Erie, but is seldom seen 
inland. On the other hand, the little 
dabchick is more often met on streams and 



and the heron." The piedbill made many 
successful trips to the lower regions, and 
seemed always to come to the surface to 
swallow his food. Minnows were swal- 




HORNED GREBE IN WINTER PLUMAGE. 
$9 



go 



RECREATION. 



lowed head first; crayfish were always 
shaken and dabbled in the water before be- 
ing gulped down. The other grebe was 
never seen to bring food to the surface. 
Can it be that he was unsuccessful? Or 
did he swallow his food while submerged? 
I should like to know the opinion of ob- 
servers who have studied these birds more 
than I have. 

It has been said that a loon always 
alights on the water with a great splash. 
Not long ago I saw 2 loons settling toward 
the surface of a Michigan lake. They sailed 
some distance, then struck the water, one 
after the other. The first came down on 
its breast and slid along, making a sheet 
of water spread into the air at each side. 



body was held in a more or less upright 
position during only 2 operations. First, 
it occasionally stood up and rapidly fanned 
its wings as any swimming bird does, at 
times. Second, sometimes it simultane- 
ously ran and flew across the floor, carry- 
ing the body almost upright, after which 
it dropped suddenly to its breast. 

I have heard the great Northern diver 
give 3 distinct cries. One consisted of 3 
long notes, each succeeding one higher and 
less loud, all done in clear soprano. An- 
other cry reminded me of the squeaking of 
a wheelbarrow. The third was the most 
famous loon note, somewhat resembling a 
laugh. To me, it suggested the screech 
owl's wail, though much louder. Accord- 



^gjapa^A^" 




PIEDBILL GREBE. 



The other dropped quietly, tail first, as 
gently as a mallard could have done. 

All the loons that my companions and I 
observed last spring seemed to swim with 
their tails drooping, submerged, as shown 
in the accompanying sketch. Is this the 
more common way? 

Who has seen a grebe or a loon stand 
erect as they do in books? How did the 
bird look when he did so? My experience 
is. limited to one captive piedbill grebe. Its 



ing to our observations the loons seemed to 
be much disturbed in unsettled weather, 
and just before a storm they would fly over, 
crying repeatedly. This habit is denied 
them by some naturalists. The calls of 
these birds seem less weird than the song 
of Bartram's sandpiper, and less myster- 
ious than that of the screech owl. How- 
ever this may be. the cries of the great 
Northern diver excite feelings in me that 
no other bird notes do, 



THE GIANT BROWN BEARS OF ALASKA 



J. A. LORING. 



Probably no other group of animals cap 
so thoroughly adapt themselves to the cli- 
mate and food conditions of the country in 
which they live, as the bears of North 




COPYRIGHT, 1908, BY THE NEW YORK ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY. 

A TYPICAL KADIAK. 
Male. Three years old. Weight about 800 pounds. 

America. While they are provided with the 
teeth and organism of carnivorous ani- 
mals, nature has also endowed them with a 
system and an appetite which soon accli- 
matizes them to any part of the continent, 



from the ice floes of the North to the ever- 
glades of the South. It matters not wheth- 
er they have been accustomed to pineapples 
and turtle eggs in Florida; wild honey and 
acorns in Pennsylvania; insects, roots, ber- 
ries and offal in the Rocky mountains ; sal- 
mon and grass in Alaska, or seal meat in 
the Arctic ; in captivity they accept an ar- 
tificial diet as variable. I have even known 
a bear to eat a greasy dish rag that once 
did duty about camp ; and who has not 
heard miners in the West tell of the amuse- 
ment they have had getting poor Bruin 
drunk. 

The Northland affords bears the oppor- 
tunity to show the carnivorous habits for 
which they seem best adapted, while in 
reality they are omniverous. Were it 
not for the seals and unlimited supply of 
fish, the bears living along the coast would 
be obliged to adopt more of a vegetarian 
diet, as do their kin inhabiting localities 
where salmon are not found. 

In Southern countries where vegetation 
and animal life are always awake and bears 
are able to secure food throughout the 
year, they do not hibernate. In the North 
their lives are necessarily divided into 2 
seasons ; a season of activity, and a season 
of sleep or hibernation. 

The largest of living carnivorous ani- 
mals, the giant of all bears, is the Kadiak 
bear of Alaska. For some unaccountable 
reason the largest specimens are found on 
the islands of Kadiak and Afognak, at the 
mouth of Cook inlet. So few Kadiak 
bears have been killed by white hunters, 
that at present there is no authentic record 
of the weight of a large representative of 
this huge species, although stories are cur- 
rent of individuals supposed to weigh 2,200 
to 2,700 pounds. It is safe to say, how- 
ever, a Kadiak bear that would tip the 
scales at 1,500 pounds would be close to 
the limit. It is impossible to obtain a cor- 
rect idea of the size of the animal when 
alive by measuring dried skins, for dur- 
ing the process of curing, the natives lace 
the hides to frames, or stake them to the 
ground, thereby stretching the skins out of 
proportion. The largest skin in posses- 
sion of the Alaska Commercial Company 
at Kadiak, in July, 1901, measured g]/ 2 feet 
from nose to tail and io l / 2 feet across the 
outstretched front paws. 

Formerly these bears were abundant on 
the island from which they take their name, 
but at present it is doubtful if the yearly 
number killed by both native and white 
hunters will average 35. In fact, their num- 



91 



92 



RECREATION. 



ber has been so reduced that the hunter 
who succeeds in adding 2 skins to his col- 
lection in a season considers himself for- 
tunate. 

Including the Kadiak bear, there are 5 
distinct species of fish-eating bears in the 
Alaskan brown bear group, all of them 
giants of the Ursidae family. As far as 
known they inhabit the timbered islands 
and coast region of Western Alaska. These 
bears are closely allied to the European 
brown bear, which relationship is used t>y 
scientists as evidence that the Alaska penin- 
sula and Siberia were once connected. 

The Alaskan bears vary greatly in color 
from a pale brown, almost yellow in some 
cases, to olive brown in others. In the fall, 
after the hair has attained its full growth, 
they are much darker than when first 
emerging from the den in the spring. 

The change from hibernation to a state 
of activity is governed by the season and 
locality in which they den up. Along the 
coast, where the salt air melts the snow 
and hastens spring, they come out earlier 
than do the bears living in the interior. 

The natives believe that the females give 
birth every second or third year. The 
young, which are brought forth the last of 
January or first of February, weigh but a 
few ounces and are the smallest animals 
born to parents of such huge size. The 
number of cubs in a litter is one or 2, rarely 
3. They remain in or near the den until 
the last of April, at which time they are 
large and strong enough to accompany 
their mother on foraging expeditions. They 
are exceedingly playful and, while the old 
bear is busy hunting food, linger behind to 
wrestle or box with each other. The 
whereabouts of the family is sometimes 
disclosed by the bawling of the cubs when 
cuffed by their mother for misdemeanors. 
At the age of 5 months, were it not for 
the white collar that frequently encircles 
the neck, they would be difficult to distin- 
guish from young grizzlies. The white 
throat mark usually disappears during the 
second or third year, although I. have seen 
skins from animals 4 years old which had 
white on the chest, and in rare instances 
a spot is found on the shoulders. Through- 
out, the first year the cubs remain with 
their mother, and sometimes hibernate with 
her, but the following spring they aban- 
don her to begin an independent life. 

On emerging from the den, about the first 
of April, the food of the adult brown bears 
consists almost entirely of grass, roots and 
leaves, but as the snow disappears from the 
mountains, they are able to secure berries 
that were preserved by the early snows of 
the previous year. Up to the beginning of 
July, they spend much time on the grassy 
slopes at and above timber line, and it is 
not uncommon to find them stretched at 



full length on a boulder or bank of snow, 
sunning themselves. 

Everything a bear examines he seeks with 
a view to appease his appetite. Watch one 
through a pair of field glasses. With head 
held low, he saunters slowly along, sniffing 
as he goes. Suddenly he stops and with 
his paw turns over a stone, pulls to pieces 
a stump, or digs up a clod of earth in hope 
of securing a mouse, grub, or bit of tender 
root that his keen nose has detected. He 
works tarefuly along, zigzagging his way 
here and there, until, when he is ready 
to return to the timber to take his mid- 
day siesta, the scene of his exploration 
bears the appearance of having been up- 
rooted by hogs. Investigation would prob- 
ably reveal tracks of various ages, where 
he had previously been, which is proof that 
this is his favorite feeding ground. The ' 
experienced hunter then knows that if he 
remains in the locality and watches, it will 
be but a few hours until he will secure a 
shot. 

Once in the timber, Bruin selects a level 
spot under a tree, or digs a hollow in the 
cool, damp earth, and after rolling in it, 
curls up and goes to sleep. He is also 
fond of taking sunbaths while he sleeps. 
The attitudes a sleeping bear assumes are 
many and ridiculous, but his favorite one 
is lying o'n his side. I have seen them 
resting on their back, all fours in the air 
and head turned to one side. When sound 
asleep they are hard to awaken. On sev- 
eral occasions after shouting and vigor- 
ously punching bears under my charge, I 
have been about to give them up for dead, 
when they slowly came to their senses and 
rolled over. 

About 5 o'clock Bruin awakens and 
again starts out to satisfy the inner bear. 
He sta}rs away all night, for as he hunts 
his food more from scent than sight, he 
leads a nocturnal as well as a diurnal life. 
Such is the daily life of a brown bear up 
to the middle of July. The salmon then 
begin to run up the streams to spawn, and 
brown bears seek the valleys to feed on 
them. From then until the middle of Sep- 
tember the food of bears consists princi- 
pally of fish and berries. This is the season 
when bears lay on fat to carry them through 
the long cold months, and they take advan- 
tage of every opportunity to glut them- 
selves.,, 

Along salmon streams and thickets where 
berries are abundant, bears wear deep wide 
trails in the moss. At the mouth of 
streams where the water is shallow, afford- 
ing them excellent opportunity to catch 
fish, the grass is so trampled one would 
think a herd of cattle had been pastured 
there. At this season the danger of being 
attacked by bears is increased, for the 
trails leading to and from the mountains 



THE GIANT BROWN BEARS OF ALASKA. 



93 



in all directions, afford easy travel to the 
weary prospector with his heavy pack, and 
the thick carpet of moss deadens his foot- 
steps. On rounding a sharp turn, he comes 
face to face with a much surprised bear. 
The animal thinks himself the victim of a 
skin game, and naturally shows fight. If 
the prospector is unarmed, it is likely to go 
hard with him. Sometimes he wins the 
day by hammering on his gold-pan and 
shouting lustily, but other poor fellows are 
less fortunate. Had the same bear de- 
tected danger, the prospector on reaching 
the stream, would have found only roily 
water and a fresh trail leading through the 
grass where the bear had made good his 
escape. 

Secrete yourself near a salmon stream' 
and watch. The creek is about a foot deep, 
and hundreds of salmon fight their way 



again and looks about. Convinced of safe- 
ty he saunters to the edge of the stream 
and peers into the water. He hesitates 
but a few seconds, for as the salmon swim 
past, with a quick stroke of his paw, he 
gracefully flips one on the bank and 
seizes it between his teeth. Carrying the 
fish a few feet from the water's edge, he 
holds it on the ground with his paws while 
he eats it entire, or if it is during the 
height of the salmon run and he is able to 
secure all the fish he wants, he will take 
only the head or tear out the belly. I have 
seen scores of salmon in all stages of decay 
lying on the bank, with only the parts 
mentioned missing. The bear does not 
hesitate to eat fish that have been dead 
several days, even when possible to catch 
live ones. 

Bruin is equally at home in a berry patch, 




COPYRIGHT, 1903. BY THE NEW YORK ZC O LOGIC AL SOCIETY. 



Cinnamon. 



A GROUP OF COUSINS IN THE PARK. 

Kadiak. Kadiak. Silvertip Grizzly. 



against the swift current, some even being 
driven on the bank by their quarrelsome 
companions. If you are on the lee side of 
the stream from that on which your game 
is expected, you will be treated to a spec- 
tacle well worth your time and trouble ; 
but if you have not taken that precaution, 
an approaching bear will surely scent 
danger and you will miss the drama about 
to be described. 

From behind the screen of drooping 
boughs keep close watch of the flat be- 
fore you. Late in the afternoon a bear ap- 
pears at the edge of the timber. He rises 
on his haunches, and with paws dropped 
by his side, carefully surveys the flat be- 
fore coming into the open. Then he falls 
to his feet, and walks slowly toward the 
stream; but before reaching it he rises 



for he has a delicate tooth for sweets and 
berries. Here you occasionally catch a 
glimpse of a bear with his head and shoul- 
ders above the brush, as he rises and gath- 
ers in the branches with his paws, then 
strips off the fruit and leaves between his 
teeth. Sometimes he is more particular, 
and while holding the branches is careful 
to pick only the fruit. 

In captivity bears are slow, clumsy, and 
awkward, but in their natural haunts their 
actions are graceful, and when occasion de- 
mands, remarkably quick. Other than a 
low guttural noise, they make no sound 
unless wounded or enraged. Then they 
bawl, not unlike frightened cattle. The 
brown bears are fond of water and can 
swim and dive almost as well as polar 
bears. 



94 



RECREATION 



Probably the meanest trick of which a 
bear is guilty, is that of breaking into 
caches of miners and trappers, and mak- 
ing havoc of their supplies. Sacks of flour 
are ripped open, blankets and tents torn 
to shreds, and cooking utensils and canned 
goods hammered to atoms. Then the un- 
fortunate owner is compelled to live on 
short rations during the remainder of his 
stay in the mountains. 

Up to the first of June bear skins are 
prime, but after that date the hair begins 
to shed and they are then worthless, al- 
though individuals in good pelage are some- 
times killed as late as July 10. By the 
middle of September they are covered with 
a layer of fat, often 4 or 5 inches thick 
on the rump and shoulders, and their coat 
has then attained its full growth. About 
2 weeks later, the time being governed 
somewhat by season and locality, they have 
selected a suitable den in which to hiber- 
nate. This is usually a cave in the rocks, 
or hollow under the roots of an upturned 
tree. As the season advances they do not 
wander far, and with the first severe 
weather take to the den for the winter, 
although should there be a warm spell they 
may come out a short time. Again, if 
water chances to drip into the den, they will 
hunt more favorable quarters. A bedding 
of leaves and dried grass is usually found 
in a den with bears having cubs. 

The Indians sometimes hunt them with 
dogs during the winter. They locate a 
den and after breaking into it, shoot or 
spear the occupants. Although the animals' 
are supposed to be in a state of torpidity, 
they are lively enough to put up a strong 
objection. In fact they move about in the 
den so much during the winter that the 
majority of skins from adult animals are 
more or less damaged by being chafed on 
protuberances in the den. 

While hunting singly, unless accompa- 
ned by dogs, most Alaskan Indians are 
loth to attack full grown brown bears, par- 
ticularly if they have cubs, and should a 
bear visit a native's cache during his ab- 
sence, he superstitiously considers it a bad 
omen. 

That bears often battle with each other is 
proven by the number of skins brought to 
the traders, which have missing claws and 
large gashes about their bodies. Such 
scars are sometimes marked by a twisted 
growth of hair, while on others it refuses 
to grow at all. 

These animals are extremely difficult to 
stalk, for at the first intimation of danger 
they usually light out at once, and will not 
return to the same locality for weeks. 
Sometimes they cross a range of mountains 
and seek new feeding grounds. Their keen 
hearing and acute sense of smell render 
it absolutely necessary for the hunter to 



approach from the leeward. A person may 
travel months in a country where bears are 
common, he may see fresh tracks in abun- 
dance, some made but a few minutes be- 
fore, but he may seldom see a bear. Their 
eyesight is poor. I have been within plain 
view of 2 brown bears not more than 100 
feet distant for half an hour and they 
failed to detect me. If unable to see the 
hunter, when fired at they are as apt to run 
forward as away from him, and since the 
use^ of smokeless powder this danger is 
increased. 

Their wrath is quick and spasmodic. 
Cubs in captivity when enraged will rush 
on a person, seize his trousers' leg between 
their teeth and give it several vigorous 
shakes, then go prowling about as un- 
concerned as though nothing had hap- 
pened. Just so with the old ones, only 
more so. I know of several cases where 
bears, when surprised at close range, have 
attacked persons, and after knocking them 
down and biting them, have deliberately 
walked away. When enraged, instead of 
squeezing their victim as is generally sup- 
posed, they rush on him, and when within 
a short distance rise on their hind feet 
and strike him down with a blow from their 
powerful paw. One blow well aimed is 
sufficient to break a man's neck, or tear 
away 'the side of his face. In addition to 
this they -may bite him a few times as he 
lies prostrate on the ground. While this 
is their usual mode of attack, there are ex- 
ceptions. 

There is not much doubt that in many 
cases a cool headed person with nerve 
could stop the charge of an infuriated bear. 
During the summer of 1901, 2 Eastern 
hunters were after brown bear in the vi- 
cinity of Chitina bay, Cook inlet. One, 
afternoon they saw a bear feeding on a 
mountainside near camp. A native and 
one of the hunters stalked the animal and 
wounded it. In his anxiety to secure the 
specimen, the- sportsman ventured close and 
fired his last cartridge, but unnerved by 
running, his bullet went wild of the mark 
and the infuriated beast charged. The 
native shouted to him not to run, but the 
words were misunderstood, and he natu- 
rally took to his heels, closely pursued. 
The native, however, stood his ground un ; 
til the animal was dangerously near, then 
gesticulating wildly, he jumped into the air 
and let out a series of yells that would 
have stunned the nerves of the evil one 
himself. The surprised bear advanced but 
a few feet farther, then turned and fled. 
The native explained that he had stopped 
charging bears in that manner before, and 
argued that his shouts and actions dis- 
tracted the bear's mind and turned his fury 
to fear. Such nerve is seldom found, either 
in white men or Indians. 



TARPON FISHING AT PASS CHRISTIAN. 



M. SNOWDEN. 



A few tarpon having been caught late paradise. Being from the hill country and 

in July and the first week in August, Dr. no angler, I went along as witness and 

A. R. Robertson, Mr. J. E. Hanson, Elmer timekeeper; and incidentally to catch small 

Northrop, Oscar Wilson, and Captain J. fry for skillet purposes. 




LIVE OAKS IN PASS CHRISTIAN. 



AMATEUR PHOTO Bf 3. L. TAYLOR. 



McDonald, of the Queen of the Fleet, be- 
came possessed with the laudable ambition 
to make the record catch of tarpon in Mis- 
sissippi waters and to make Pass Chris- 
tian rival the Florida resorts as an anglers' 



By much use of the telephone Dr. Rob- 
ertson aroused the whole party, and the 
entire neighborhood also, in the small 
hours of the morning; and by 4 o'clock we 
were all aboard the Queen of the Fleet, 




.... ■ ■ ... . ■ 



AMATEUR PHOTO BY S. L. TAYLOR. 



QUEEN OF THE FLEET IN THE LEAD, PASS CHRISTIAN REGATTA. 

95 ~ — 



96 



RECREATION. 



the fastest and best schooner on the Gulf 
coast, Mississippi. Captain McDonald, of 
the Queen, makes a specialty of taking out 
parties for all kinds of fishing; and be- 
sides being expert with the rod and reel, 
he is a clever fellow and a good cap- 
tain. 

We were somewhat delayed at the ice 
factory in getting our ice supply; but the 
time was well improved in catching sardine 
and mullet bait. At 6.10 a. m. we were off 
for Tarpon Keys, 6 miles South of the 
Pass ; and after a delightful sail of 50 
minutes, we reached the Keys at 7 o'clock 
sharp. During the run out, rods and reels 
were carefully fixed and breakfast was 
eaten. By 7.10 all hands and the cook 
were in skiffs, fishing in couples. Dr. Rob- 
ertson and Captain McDonald soon had 
strikes, as the water seemed alive with 
tarpon. The sea was as smooth as glass 
and the striking of the tarpon, either at 
bait or food in the water, was a beautiful 
sight. The glint of the silver scales on 
the quiet water and in the morning sun 
made a dazzling picture. Soon the wel- 
come cry of "keep time" was heard, for 
Dr. Robertson, after having had several 
strikes, hooked his fish and the fight was 
on. 

The tarpon made his usual wonderful 
leaps, high in the air, to shake the "hook 
from his jaws; but the Doctor was his 
master and in 7 minutes landed his first 
tarpon. The crowd cheered the Doctor, 
that being the first tarpon caught by a Pass 
Christian sportsman ; and his success stim- 
ulated the others to greater exertions. 

Captain McDonald hooked a beauty; but 
being a little over anxious, he put too 
much pressure on his line and Mr. Tar- 
pon continued his course for Havana. 



Soon the Captain redeemed himself by 
landing a regular "papa" in 16 minutes. 
Dr. Robertson completed his score by land- 
ing a larger one than the Captain's, in 11 
minutes. 

Then Oscar Wilson 
worked one up in 10 
inches of water on the 
bank of one of the Keys, 
but in its frantic efforts 
to escape its pursuers 
the tarpon beat the hook 
against the shells and 
was gone. Wilson did 
not say much, but what 
he looked was sufficient 
to make a book. 

Before long Hanson 
landed the grandpa of 
the bunch, in 14 min- 
utes ; and he was a beau- 
ty. Hanson -claims that 
by "expert knowledge" 
he landed the first tar- 
pon he ever hooked. 

Captain McDonald fin- 
ished the catch with a 
small one. The fishing 
was over by 1 p. m. ; and 
after a good luncheon 
the Queen was headed 
for home so photographs 
could be taken. The 3 
large tarpons measured 5 
feet 6 inches and the 2 
smaller ones 4 feet 7 

tarpon caught at inches each.^ 

Pass Christian offers 
unlimited sport to all 
lovers of the rod and 
reel ; and the anglers of the Pass extend a 
cordial welcome to all the brethren. 



PASS CHRISTIAN 
AUG. 14, I902 



A TRAGEDY. 



A. L. VERMILYA. 



On a leafy bough of a maple tree 

That stands in a city street, 
Is a robin's nest- — a masterpiece 

Of the builder's art complete. 
Once above the nest a robin sang 

To her downy, cherished brood, 
Or flitted lightly about the lawn, 

In quest of their daily food. 

But one sad morn when the mother stopped 

To drink by a little stream, 
A boy with an air gun came that way — ■ 

Then closed her summer dream. 
She lay with the blood stains on her breast, 

Close by the streamlet's brink, 
While the cruel boy with his gun sped on — 

He did not care nor think. 



All day the nestlings cried for food, 

All day the sun beat down 
On the nest in the maple tree that stood 

In the heart of the busy town. 
All night the moon looked sadly on, 

As her light she softly shed 
On the orphan birds in the lonely nest — 

Ere morn they all were dead. 

The straw built nest is empty now, 

And through the maple tree 
The summer winds, as they come and go, 

Sing ever mournfully. 
O parents, teach your thoughtless boys, 

With earnest, heartfelt words, 
To walk in nature's pleasant ways, 

And love the singing birds. 



AN INTERESTING SUMMER BOARDER. 



J. H. FISHER, JR. 



I hand you herewith a photo of a pet 
fox and his summer camp. He was the 
star boarder at one of the resorts at Milli- 
nockett, Me., last summer. One of the 
guides captured him in the woods when he 
was a kitten, took him home, raised him 



tently for a time and try to estimate its 
size, it may grow under your imagination 
to be 10 feet wide and 6 to 8 feet high. As 
a matter of fact, however, the house is 
built of small birch sticks; is about 18 
inches wide, 24 inches long, 20 inches high 




WHAT MONSTER IS THIS? 



AMATEUR PHOTO BY J. H. FISHER, JR 



on a bottle, and he soon grew to the full 
stature of his kind. He was as tame and 
as sociable as any dog. He would romp 
and play with the children, or with the 
dogs, or with the grown people, as freely 
and as joyfully as any animal I ever 
saw. He readily acquired the omnivorous 
appetite of the dogs about camp and would 
eat anything and everything that came 
from the table. 

The picture presents a strange optical il- 
lusion. Almost anyone looking at the 
cabin would say it was 4 to 6 feet square 
and of equal height. If you look at it in- 



at the eaves and 26 inches at the cone. It 
is covered with miniature cedar splits or 
shakes. The balcony in front is about 12 
inches wide. 

Strangely enough, the proprietor of the 
resort, when he closed his place for the 
winter, left Reynard to hustle for himself; 
so the animal is probably living on grouse, 
snow buntings, mice and any other small 
birds or quadrupeds he may be able to 
capture. I shall be curious to know 
whether he comes back to the hotel when 
it opens at the beginning of the fishing 
season. 



"So he gave you a dog?" 

"Yassir," answered Erastus Pinkley. 

"He must like you." 

"Well, I can't make out foh sho' wheth- 
er he likes me or whether he don't like de 
dog." — Popular Mechanics. 

97 




BARROW'S GOLDEN-EYE. ADULT MALE, CLAN QUIA ISLANDICA. 

98 




lur^T^ 



"■ ■ 



WHITE PTARMIGAN, WILLOW PTARMIGAN, ETC. LAGOPUS LAGOPUS. 

Summmer Plumage. 

99 t 



IN THE WOODS WITH ROD AND CAMERA. 



F. W. HALSEY, M.D. 



Leaving Boston at 9 145 p. m., Bangor is 
comfortably reached at 5 a. m. An hour 
for breakfast and a cigar, and we are again 
whizzing along, over a route well worth 
enjoying by daylight, our objective point 
being Ashland, the terminus of one branch 
of the Bangor and Aroostook Railroad. 
Through a virgin forest, for much of the 
distance, but little disfigured by fire or de- 
pleted by the woodman's ax, Ashland is 
reached at 12 130 p. m. A good dinner, and 
we are once more pressing into the wilder- 
ness, in a comfortable buggy, behind a 
good horse and over a good road. Portage 
lake is reached after a 10 mile drive. 
There our guide met us with canoe, hav- 
ing come down the river for that purpose. 
We then had a canoe trip up Portage lake 
5 miles, and up Fish river 15 miles. Ine 
wind was blowing great guns on the lake, 
and dead ahead. We must get there, how- 
ever, and we make the start. I have not 
been in a canoe nor touched a paddle for 
about a year, but that is ignored, and I 
strain every nerve in the effort to keep up 
my end. It proves the fiercest wind 
against which I ever paddled, and much of 
the time we are able to hold our own only 
by the greatest effort. Two hours of hard 
work take us to Orcutt's camp, a short 
3 miles on our way. Discretion seems the 
better part of valor, and we decide to stay 
over night with Orcutt, who has a beauti- 
ful set of camps, and makes us comfort- 
able. Up and on the water at 4 o'clock 
next morning. Eighteen miles ordinarily 
would not be much of a paddle, but when 
13 of it is up a swift and shallow stream, 
it means a great deal of hard work. But, 
oh ! the joy of it. 

It was Sunday, August 12, the Sunday 
following that terrible Saturday when Bos- 
ton sweltered at 98 deg. Was it hot here ? 
Decidedly no. We slept cold under 2 blan- 
kets and a quilt. The sun was welcomed 
gladly as it crept above the trees. The sky 
was never so blue, ' the water never so 
clear, and with deep, full breaths we drank 
in the pure, delightful air, only dispensed 
in God's country. The gulls saluted us 
shrilly, as we sped along. A flock of black 
ducks rose with whir and splutter, circling 
to our left to let us pass. Soon we entered 
the river, deep, silent, its banks shaded by 
beautiful trees of almost every variety, all 
fresh and green and casting their perfect 
shadows into the quiet water at their feet. 
At every turn, a new, beautiful picture. 
My paddle is cast down, and I surrender 



myself entirely to the panorama. The 
guide is an expert canoeman, and we pro- 
ceed almost noiselessly. Sweeping around 
a sudden turn, we come on 2 deer, standing 
on a sand point, one drinking, the other 
watching. They see us, but we are abso- 
lutely quiet, and they show no fear. The 
instinct of the hunter is strong on me, and 
I reach for my gun. Ah, I remember I 
brought no gun this year, but a camera. 
It is one of the late folding contraptions; 
it does not spring open as it should, but 
is pried open finally. In pulling out the 
bellows to get the proper focus, the cam- 
era being new to me, I pull too hard 
and off goes the bellows from its trolley. 
No time to fix this. A glance is taken 
at the deer. Charlie has simply held 
the canoe steady, making no sound, and 
the deer are standing quietly, not^ much 
over 50 feet away, waiting to be "took." 
Steadying the thing as well as possible, I 
press the button. At the sharp click, their 
flags go up, and with a startled whisk, 
they 1 are off. By no means a novice with 
the camera, I have ample time now to re- 
flect, and realize that my photograph may 
turn out well as a landscape, but it will 
never draw a prize as a picture of game. 
Never mind. ; the picture impressed on my 
retina is perfect. Nothing can spoil that. 
Now we are in quick water, and now for 
13 miles it is all poling; rather hard work 
for Charlie, but more or less exciting 
for me. 

Hugh's brook, a clear, cold stream, flow- 
ing into the river, offers a convenient spot 
for breakfast, and a chance for a few 
trout. It is not easy to get at my rods, so 
I cut a pole. Charlie has a short line and 
hook in his pocket; a nail serves for sink- 
er, and we start in. Fortunately, we 
begged Vi dozen worms last night, or we 
could not eat trout for breakfast. The hot-, 
torn is hardly reached, when a tug is felt, 
and a ^-pounder is pulled in. Once more, 
this time a ^-pounder gets there first, and 
pays the penalty. In 5 minutes we have 
enough for breakfast. Charlie proceeds to" 
get it ready while I continue fishing. This 
is the best I have had in a year or more, 
and although the method is deplorable, we 
must have fish, and how do I know that the 
fellows have trout in camp; so I keep on 
fishing till we have 25 nice ones; in other 
words, till my worms give out. When 
2-3 of our way up stream, we are obliged 
to carry our boat and luggage around a 
fall, but not a long or hard carry. A little 



IN THE WOODS WITH ROD AND CAMERA. 



101 



more hard poling, and we are once more in 
dead water, and soon in Big Fish lake, 
our destination, one of the most beautiful 
lakes I have ever seen. Dotted with many 
picturesque islands, surrounded by green 
hills and mountains, its waters clear as 
crystal, it furnishes a scene ever varying 
and beautiful. From the clinging mists 
of early morning, to the resplendent sun- 
sets, it is always a beautiful picture. A 
short paddle, and we are within hail of 
our camp, "Injun Camp." The Admiral's 
salute is not in it to the welcome accorded 
us by those in camp, and we are soon in 
the hands of our friends. It has been my 
privilege to spend many vacations in the 
woods, and I have tried tenting and living 
in the typical log camp, but never before 
in a spot so ideal. Three good sized tents, 
the largest having a fly, covering the tent 
completely and projecting 15 feet in front, 
made a fire under the fly practical, and 
allowed us to sit out doors, yet pro- 
tected us from wet weather. The usual 
bed of fir boughs was supplemented by 
an arrangement of logs and small limbs, 
put together as only expert guides know 
how. Through the ingenuity of some 
of our party tables, washstands, seats and 
even rustic and comfortable chairs had been 
built. With an ample larder, furnished 
from "Pierce's best," who could refuse -to 
be happy? There was but one drawback 
to this paradise. We were not to enjoy its 
beauties and comforts alone. Though so 
far from home, and so difficult of access, 
40 others had spied out this particular spot, 
and located at different camps on the 
lake. 

Then followed days of supreme delight. 
We could be as lazy as we wished, meals 
at any hour, and have what we ordered. 
There were but 4 of us, all congenial, and 
the 2 best guides in the region. We were 
more than fortunate, but this was not all 
due to luck. Freeman is an old cam- 
paigner; that was one of his stamping 
grounds, and he had tried the McGowen 
brothers, George and Charlie, before, and 
they were not found wanting. So much 
is dependent on inte/ligent and willing 
guides. It makes all the difference between 
a successful, happy trip, and a dismal fail- 
ure. Indeed, that whole beautiful region 
was completely hoodooed for us, owing to 
the experience of 2 intimate friends, who 
went up*there and fell into the hands of the 
Philistines. One of our pleasures this year 
consisted in trying to get some good pic- 
tures of game. Have you ever tried it? 
It is as difficult as taking a picture of a 
2 year old baby ; worse, if anything. It is 
difficult to take a large camera from place 
to place in the woods or even in a canoe, 
and with the small affairs used for snap 



shots, it is almost impossible to get near 
enough to the game to get a good picture. 
Notwithstanding this, I had some delight- 
ful morning and evening trips trying it. 
Occasionally it was too early in the morn- 
ing, sometimes too late in the evening. 
Again, after making a snap, I would find 
that the sun had hidden its face under a 
cloud just at the moment of my exposure. 
Another time the sun would persist in 
shining directly in the face of the lens, and 
the deer would not change their pose nor 
allow me to move either the sun or myself. 
Many days were cloudy, and nothing could 
be done against a background of trees. 
In ' only one exposure where deer were 
included in the picture, were the conditions 
all with me, and I have already told of my 
discomfiture in takjng that. The old saying, 
"you see the game when you haven't a 
gun," applies equally well to camera hunt- 
ing. I was particularly anxious to get a 
picture of an old bull moose. Let me tell 
you how near I came to it. 

We were on our way home, having been 
up a river offering a good chance to see 
a moose. Half way down the river, we came 
to a loggers' camp. There we stopped for 
lunch. Five minutes after leaving the 
camp we noticed a peculiar reddish looking 
branch protruding from the bushes away 
down the river. We had converted so 
many stumps, branches and things into 
deer, only to find them change back into 
plain inanimate objects as we drew nearer, 
that we kept still. Presently the 
seeming bush moved, and resolved itself 
into the antlers of a large bull moose. He 
saw us fully as soon as we did him, He 
waited until we were within 75 yards of 
him, then turned his head and horns away 
from us, and sneaked into the bushes. We 
could see his huge hind quarters as he 
slowly moved away, but he was so con- 
cealed by the bushes that no picture could 
be secured of him. He would have been 
an easy mark with a rifle, but alas, we 
could not shoot him ; it was yet the close 
season, and it would not do. His horns 
were still in the velvet and it would have 
been impossible to keep the head; besides 
we had no gun. 

The lake on which we were encamped 
furnishes the best of trout fishing most 
of the season, the trout rising freely 
to the fly. As in most of these large 
lakes, the trout are capricious, and at 
times, though breaking water freely all 
around us, no fly which we could select 
proved sufficiently seductive. While we 
were able to take a few trout every day, it 
was not what would be called good fishing. 
Charlie spoke of a pond several miles 
through the woods, where he believed we 
could get fine fishing if we could strike 



102 



RECREATION. 



them right; and yet even there he had 
seen a man fish all day without a rise. 
There was no boat on the pond, and having 
decided to go over, George and Charlie 
proceeded to lug in a canoe, 4 miles 
through the woods over an indifferent 
trail. As my time in the woods was to be 
briefer than that of the others, I was given 
first chance. We reached the pond about 
5.30 a. m. 

Adjusting our rods quickly, we began 
our work first near the inlet, where we 
soon caught a few little fellows, Y/\. to Ya 
pounders. Then at Charlie's suggestion I 
moved to a spot where he knew there were 
big ones, if only they would bite. At once 
the fun began. My first strike, a big fel- 
low, I lost, together with part of my line 
and my leader. By the time it had grown 



too dark to fish, we had taken y 2 dozen, 
ranging from i^4 pounds to 3 pounds; 
doubles the last cast, one of i}i pounds, the 
other 3 pounds. 

A deserved cabin by the shore offered us 
a shelter for the night, where after supper 
we sank to rest on the bough beds prepared 
a year before by some other campers. At 
4:55 next morning we were out in our 
canoe and at work. At 8 a. m.. we quit and 
counted up our spoils, 42 trout weighing 
between 60 and 70 pounds ! Never have I 
seen another such string of trout. A pho- 
tograph of them was taken, breakfast eaten, 
and we started back for camp, which we 
reached by 1 p. m. 

A few days more of this idyllic life, then 
the sad return to civilization and its cease- 
less, remorseless grind. 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY J DUNaAR. 

CLOSE HAULED. 
Taken with a Goerz Lens. 



AMATEUR PHOTO BY J DJN3AR. 

THE OTHER TACK. 
Taken with a Goerz Lens. 



This is the way a Billville justice laid 
down the law: "Mr. Bailiff, take the law- 
yer to jail for 10 days, give the woman a 
divorce, whip the husband and bring in a 
jug of liquor." — Atlanta Constitution. 



A TRIP FOR TROUT. 



DR. J. S. EMANS. 
Photos by the Author. 



In 1861, when my father, an Englishman, 
sailed from Leyden, in Holland, to Amer- 
ica, I am sure it was because he had heard 
there was good fishing here. At any rate, 
the fishing microbe has always been ramp- 
ant in the male line of our family. Al- 
though I am able to keep this microbe 
fpirly quiet most of the year by feeding 
him on stories from Recreation, the sum- 
mer's heat develops such a host of these 
pleasant nuisances, that about the 1st of 
August every year they give me an attack 
of acute FisJiitis, and I have to seek the 
Northland for a cure. 

Last year, with Wm. A. Dutcher, I left 
New York August 9th for Boston. The 
next day we took the Dominion Atlantic 
steamer to Yarmouth, Nova Scotia. Af- 
ter a trip through the beautiful valley of 
Anapolis bay, we stopped at Wolfville, 
and drove 3 miles to Grand Pre. There 




Evangeline's willows, grand pre. 

I took snap shots of Evangeline's well and 
willows, and the site of the Arcadian 
smithy; also of the bridge over the Gas- 
pereau. Sad it is that fact and fancy are 
often so far apart. Longfellow never saw 
the land of his poem. Still, one loves to 
linger beneath the willows and gaze at far 
off Blomidon. 

Those who have visited Quebec, and Le- 
vis opposite, and have seen the tremendous 
fortifications, must have been impressed 
with the fact that England has planted one 
foot there. I never discovered where the 
other foot had been planted until I went 
to Halifax. There I saw the evidences 
of her lingering love for America ; but 
we were not especially interested in forts 
and footprints. We were looking for trout. 

Hearing that Campbellton, on the Res- 



tigouche river, at the head of the bay of 
Chaleur, was the best place in the world 
to satisfy our desires, we started on the 




ROCKS AT HOPEWELL CAPE. 

371 mile trip North. Leaving Halifax at 
16.30 o'clock on the Intercolonial railroad, 
we stopped off at Moncton, 22.40 o'clock, 
so the time table said, in order to see the 
tidal bore of the Petitcodiac river. We 
were told that in only 3 places in the world 
does this phenomenon occur. Twice in 24 




ROCKS AT HOPEWELL CAPE. 



103 



104 



RECREATION. 



hours the river, which is one third of a mile 
wide, empties and is refilled by a tidal 
wave, caused by the 60 foot tide in the 
Bay of Fundy 25 miles below. At times the 
water rushes up the river in a wave 5 
feet high. We were well repaid by the 
sight ; also for the 24 mile drive to Hope- 
well cape,, at the mouth of the river, where 
the rocks are carved out in fantastic 
shapes by the wonderful Fundy tides. 

Leaving Moncton at 11.22 a. m. we 
reached Campbellton at 17.45 P- m - The 
next morning we drove 4 miles up be- 
hind Sugar Loaf mountain to Parker lake, 
which although only ]/^ mile wide by ? /$ of 
a mile in length, is famous for its trout. 
The lake is owned by Mr. Pritchard, 
who charges $1 a day for each rod. After 
some sad experiences with certain fisher- 
men whose composition was mostly pork, 
he allows no one to catch more than 10 
pounds a day. The trout are peculiar in 
that they will not look at a fly, and have 
appetite only for grasshoppers. With 
a bottle of hoppers, and a boy to row us 
to the best spots, we fished till noon. Then 
we had our first fill of trout, prepared in 
the most delicious manner by Mrs. Pritch- 
ard. Bill ate so many, I noticed signs of 
distress in the region of his belt during , 
all our afternoon fishing. We caught in 
all 40 trout, the largest 1% pounds and 
many 1 pound. The small ones, facetiously 
called "sprats" by our guide, we returned 
to the lake. 

The following day being August 15th 
and the last for salmon fishing, we decided 
to try our luck in the far famed Resti- 
gouche, whose waters lapped the back of 
the hotel. ' We were told we were not 
likely to catch any because of the lateness 
of the season, our lack of proper equip- 
ment, and the fact that the best waters 
were leased by the Metapedia Club. As 
it costs $10,000 to join the club, and there 
were no vacancies, we gave up that idea. 
However, we thought our trout rods and 
landing nets all right, until a gentleman 
showed us his salmon rod, which looked 
like a telegraph pole, and his gaff, like a 
shepherd's crook. We wilted, but bought 
some double hooked salmon flies, took our 
heaviest bait rod, a borrowed grilse rod, 
and a freight train 10 miles up to Flat 
Lands. There, for a small consideration, 
I got permission from Mrs. McDonald to 
fish her waters in the Restigouche. With 
Tom. and Dan Delaney as guides, in a 
Gaspe canoe, we cast our 75 cent flies all 
day, with the results of one rise from a 
grilse and 4 aching wrists. We had at 
least been swell and fished for the lordly 
salmon, and we were satisfied. 

A day later we visited the Powell, and 
saw a sight calculated to make an angler 
lie awake nights. In a narrow strip of shal- 



low water, staked off between 10 islands, 
were 300 salmon, averaging 20 pounds 
each. These had been caught in a weir, 
and were to be kept there until Septem- 
ber, when they were to be stripped of 
spawn and returned to the river. 
■ With fly and bait, in the Restigouche, 
we" were rewarded with 2 fair catches of 
beautiful silvery sea trout, averaging about 
a pound in weight. The first run of trout 
had been long before at the head waters 
of the river, and the second run was only 
just beginning, so we were informed by 
our Indian guide, Tom Condo. 

Hearing of some wonderful catches of 
5 and 6 pound brook trout in Indian lake, 
22 miles South of Campbellton, we de- 
cided that was the place to go. Many had 
heard of the lake, but few had ever been 




THE INDIAN LAKE EXPRESS. 

there. As a consequence, it took one even- 
ing and all the next day to find a guide to 
take us there. One morning at 8 o'clock 
we started with Tom Chorette and drove 
and walked 16 miles over a rough road 
into the woods. One stop was made to 
"boil the kettle," which term designates 
meal time in camp throughout New Bruns- 
wick. Having gone as far as possible with 
the wagon, our provisions, tent, feed for 
the horse, etc., were transferred to a sled 
and we started over a trail 6 miles to the 
lake. There never was a more woods- 
wise horse than Dick, who was a constant 
source of wonder and admiration. He cer- 
tainly was half human. Simply by word 



A TRIP FOR TROUT. 



105 



of mouth, he was driven over fallen trees, 
through mud, up and down almost per- 
pendicular ridges. To be sure, the sled 
was sometimes overturned, but 1 never 
blamed Dick. 

We were at last in the "forest primeval." 
Spruce, hemlock and pine, with the most 
magnificent white birches were on every 
hand; but we missed the woodsy odor of 
our Adirondack balsams. 

Many moose, caribou, and a few deer 
tracks were seen. Reaching the lake a 
little ahead of our guide we saw a beaver 
swimming a short distance from shore. 
While we watched him he dived and slap- 
ped his paddlelike tail on the water 11 
times as a warning that there were vis- 
itors on the lake. During the 5 days of 
our stay we saw him every morning and 
evening. He used to come swimming in 
' zigzag manner toward us, and wonder 
what we were doing on our raft of logs in 
his preserve. Sometimes he would dive 
quietly and again slap his tail, sending the 
spray 5 feet in the air. We came to love 
him and would have liked to exchange 
cards, but could only exchange glances. 
The last morning he came within 50 feet 
of us and we took snap shots of him as 
he lay on the water and as he dived. We 
broke his dam and left a stick projecting 
from it. During the night he cut the- 
stick half in 2, in his effort to remove it. 

The lake was full of trout, and evenings, 
just before dark, the water fairly boiled 
with rolling, leaping specimens. Such gamy 
ones I never saw. It was exciting, amus- 
ing, provoking, to spend 5 or more min- 



utes landing a T / 2 pound trout when one 
wished to gc f him off and try for some 
big fellow who rose near. We got plenty 
of one, iy 2 and 2 pounders, but none of 
the big fellows we heard about. It took 
12 minutes to land the largest. Our larg- 
est were caught on a red tag Parmer, and 
a grilse Silver Doctor on which was 
hooked a trout eye. 

Sleeping on a bough bed, with our 
clothes on, in a small tent, listening to the 
rain drops fall, and unfortunately some- 
times feeling them ; hearing the hoot owl, 
and the 'snore of our guide, who was a 
past master in the art, are things enjoya- 
ble for a time; things which on return to 
civilization make the warm bath, clean 
clothes, good dinner and clean bed most 
delightful. 

We went for trout and we got them, we 
were hungry iok trout and we ate them 
until it seemed we would never want 
another. Our trip had been a success, and 
we put up our rods satisfied, with no de- 
sire to see them again for another year. 

On our trip out we saw, at Fourteen 
Mile lake, where a moose had been killed 
and cleaned, although the law was not 
yet up. 

There are a large number of places in 
Northern New Brunswick, in the vicinity 
of Campbellton, where there is excellent 
fishing. The one drawback is that the 
best waters are leased. It is often possible 
to make arrangements with the lessees, 
and either in their waters, or those not 
leased, the desires of the most ardent 
angler may be satisfied. 



jf^8?""^(g® 



/# til 

•Mm 



Sw 



' £k 4" '■ '".' 





AMATEUR PHOTO BY H O. BJORNAAS 

GREY GOPHER. 
Winner of 27th Prize in Recreation's 7th Annual Photo Competition. 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY E. S. WILSOIIi 



THREE JOLLY TARS. 
Winner of 35th Prize in Recreation's 7th Annual Photo Competition. 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY CHARLES B, WRIGHT 

A NIGHT IN CAMP. 
Winner of 34th Prize in Recreation's 7th Annual Photo Competition. 

106 



TWO TENDERFEET IN THE GRAND DISCHARGE. 



ROBERT FROTHINGHAM. 



While spending a part of my vacation 
in Quebec last July my attention was at- 
tracted by the following advertisement of 
a local dealer in sporting goods: 

"Have you ever seen a ouananiche? 

There is one on exhibition at our store." 

Impelled as much by curiosity to learn 
how the word was pronounced as to see 
the fish itself, the next morning found me 
at the store in question, only to find dis- 
played a mounted specimen of what might 
have been a beautiful fish when taken from 
the water. My disappointment must have 
been apparent to the courteous clerk who 
inquired as he looked me over: 

"From the States?'' 

"Yes," I replied. 

"Going up to the lake after 'wannan- 
ishe'," he ventured, glancing at my wife 
who stood near, with a helpless expres- 
sion on her face, wondering what my reply 
would be. 

"Well, that depends. I thought you had 
a live specimen of that fish here on exhibi- 
tion, and I wanted to see it." 

"They are brought fresh from Lake St. 
John every day," he replied, "you can see 
one that has been out of water less than 24 
hours;" and stepping to the telephone he 
called a fish dealer who appeared a few 
minutes later with a magnificent specimen 
hanging by the gills from his finger. To 
my wondering eyes the fish looked fully 2 
feet long and I would have said it weighed 
8 or 10 pounds. As a matter of fact, how- 
ever, there was but little over 3 pounds of 
fish. 

"How are those big fellows caught? 
With a spoon?" I inquired, recalling my 
only fishing excursion since a country lad, 
trolling for bluefish off Fire Island. 

"No,"" he replied; "they are caught with 
the fly, up in the Grand Discharge. It 
isn't considered sportsmanlike to troll for 
the ouananiche, and there is little of it 
done up at the lake. Would you like to 
see some tackle?" In a moment, for the 
first time in my life, I held a jointed rod 
in my hand and was trying my best to look 
wise as the ambitious salesman talked 
glibly of the best rods for the ouanan- 
iche. Opening a wallet full of flies, he 
gave me a dissertation on the superior 
merits of Jock Scott, Silver Doctor, Hare's 
Ear, etc., while my wife discreetly turned 
her attention to something on the other 
side of the store. I didn't have the nerve 
to tell him that my knowledge of rods and 
flies was limited by what I had seen of 



them through a plate glass window of a 
sportsmen's supply house ; that 1 had never 
essayed a cast nor sat in a canoe; that I 
knew no more of the art than a child ; 
that, in fact, I had no earthly right to be 
wasting his time; and so, as gracefully 
as possible, I made my escape, in the be- 
lief that I had not given myself away. 

Nevertheless, in that brief interview I 
had made up my mind that we would go 
to Lake St. John and try our luck. The 
next day found us on our way for a ride 
of 200 miles North from Quebec 
through the Laurentian mountains, the 
"Canadian Adirondtacks," up the Quebec 
and Lake St. John railway, to Roberval, 
the Northernmost settlement between Que- 
bec and Hudson's bay. The railroad runs 
directly to the Hotel Roberval, the only 
hostelry in the place. 

As I had been given to understand that 
fishing privileges would have to be bought, 
it was a pleasure to learn that the pro- 
prietor of the hotel had leased from the 
Provincial government all the ouananiche 
waters within a radius of several days' 
journey from Lake St. John, and that 
they were all free to guests. The next 
morning we started on the steamer Mis- 
tassini, for a 25 mile sail across the lake, 
to the Island House, at the head of the 
Grand Discharge. There the waters of 
the lake begin their descent, and there is 
first felt the impetus of the current which 
forms the terrific rapids extending all the 
way to Chicoutimi, 40 miles below, where 
they empty into the Saguenay. The 
strength of the current was apparent from 
the powerful steamboat itself which, hav- 
ing rounded the point of the island, was 
hurried along by the rushing water at a 
rate that made it necessary to round to 
before a landing could be made. 

Luncheon over, a birch bark canoe and 
2 trusty guides, Joe Morel, one of the old- 
est and best known of the Canadian voy- 
ageurs around the Grand Discharge, and 
his son, a young fellow of 20, were on 
hand, ready to transport us to the ouanan- 
iche pools below. Mrs. Wife looked at 
the frail craft, in the bottom of which I 
had taken a seat, and remarked senten- 
tiously, 

"Two hundred and ten pounds besides 
the weight of the guides is enough in that 
cockleshell. I'll stay here and finish this 
novel, while you go fishing." 

There being but half a day at our dis- 
posal we- went down stream about 6 miles, 



107 



io8 



RECREATION. 



hugging the Eastern shore of the Dis- 
charge and beaching the canoe in a quiet 
little cove. The guides dragged it up in 
the bushes and we started overland for a 
walk of a mile and a half to the fishing 
grounds. Joe Morel could talk but little 
English and I knew no French, so there 
was nothing to do but follow my leader.. 
Incidentally I gathered the impression that * 
Joe and his son would rather walk than 
paddle, in spite of his oft repeated asser- 
tion, "Portaj de canoe, no time feesh.'' 

Ever as we walked through the rough 
trail that had been hewn out of the under- 
brush, I could hear the reverberating roar 
of a distant waterfall, which penetrated the 
silence of the woodland and forced itself 
on the senses with an insistence that could 
not be shaken off. A sudden turn in the 
trail took us out into the open and in full 
view of the grands chute, the first falls of 
the Grand Discharge, a roaring fall of 
some 15 feet, extending like a huge dam 
entirely across the stream, which was in 
the neighborhood of 1,000 feet wide, and 
terminating in a series of fearful rapids. 
To me they seemed as voluminous and 
powerful as the whirlpool rapids of Niag- 
ra and infinitely more terror striking and 
awe inspiring because of the primeval 
grandeur of the scene. 

Huge boulders of gneiss and granite as 
large as a house were lying about on every 
side, with a profusion that bespoke some 
terrific convulsion of the earth's surface 
centuries agone. The surge and roar of 
the rushing waters were appalling. Al- 
most overcome by the terrific spectacle I 
turned to Morel, the guide, and asked him 
wher.e we were going to fish. 

"On de rock we feesh," he replied, 
pointing to a huge boulder that jutted out 
from a point near where the swirling 
waters rose and fell like the swell from 
an ocean liner. Suiting the action to the 
word, he unlimbered the rod- and ran out 
the line, with a big grey fly on a double 
hook at the end and another smaller fly 2 
feet above. The incongruity of the situa- 
tion was almost painful and as the mind 
sometimes reverts to the ridiculous under 
excitement, the old lines from 'Mother 
Goose" came trooping through my brain, 

"Simple Simon went afishing 

For to catch a whale, 
And all the water he had got 

Was in his mother's pail." 

The idea of throwing a hook into that 
cauldron of rushing water, with the ex- 
pectation of catching a fish, was too much 
for me and in a dazed condition of wonder 
and incredulity I told Joe to go ahead 
while I sat down on the rock to watch 
him. I had never seen a fly cast. It was 
mighty interesting to watch the clever 



twist of the wrist which carried the line 
30 to 50 feet out into the stream and drop- 
ped it as deftly on the water as if it had 
been laid there by a fairy's wand. Sud- 
denly the point of the rod went down 
and Joe put the rod in my hands that I 
might experience, for the first time, the 
sensation of a lusty fish fighting for his 
life on 30 feet of silken twine run out from 
a 7 ounce rod. 

Once more a case of unconscious cere- 
bration. The only thing I could think of 
was an incident in my boyhood in the 
country, when I vainly tried to navigate 
a bull calf with a rope out of a 10 acre 
lot. How that fish did pull ! Instinct- 
ively I began to reel in the line. Joe's ex- 
perienced eye noted that I was proceeding 
with more zeal than knowledge and he 
cautioned me to take it easy. He had 
scarcely spoken when the line suddenly 
slackened and like a bar of burnished sil- 
ver flashing in the sunlight, a handsome 
fish leaped into the air twice in succession. 
Away went the line, singing through the 
reel. 

«. "No so fast," cried Joe, apparently as 
much excited as I was; and he grabbed 
my hand away from the reel, to prevent 
my making a fiasco of a fine chance. With 
a look of anxiety on his face which be- 
trayed only too well his fear that I would 
lose the game, yet too experienced a guide 
to offer to take the rod from my hands, 
he directed me as a mother would a child, 
until little by little, after about 15 min- 
utes, the fish was brought up close by the 
rock and Joe cleverly scooped him in with 
the landing net. 

"Wannaneesh," Joe said laconically, as 
he held up the fish to view. 

"How big?" I queried. 

"Oh, leetle more dan pound and half," 
came the astounding reply, for I was sat- 
isfied there had been fully 5 or 6 pounds 
of fish on the end of the line. He was 
well hooked, having swallowed the fly, 
which jolted my pride a little, for already 
I was becoming impressed with my ability 
as an angler. 

For the next hour or so I held the rod 
and made my first attempts at fly casting, 
during which time I hooked Joe's trousers, 
my own back, a big log lying on a boulder 
high above my head, and the rock itself. 
I seemed able to land the fly on almost 
any spot within a radius of 50 feet except 
in the water. The precise measure of rank 
disgust experienced by old Morel was a 
mystery to me, for every time I looked at 
him he was either busy lighting his pipe 
or looking the other way; a most consid- 
erate guide. I began wondering if, after 
all, it was unsportsmanlike to troH for 
ouananiche, for I was becoming satisfied 



TWO TENDERFEET IN THE GRAND DISCHARGE. 



109 



that the spasmodic stabs I was making in 
the atmosphere, in my efforts to cast the 
fly, were unlikely to raise a fish. Turning 
to Morel, who was lying prone on a pine 
log that had been thrown up by the high 
water, I said, 

"Joe, come here and show me how to 

handle this d d pole." 

With a patience that discounted Job's, 
Joe stood by my side and demonstrated as 
best he could that deft movement of the 
wrist and forearm that kept the line alive 
as it whizzed back and forth through the 
air and dropped the fly in the turbulence 
beyond, cleverly drawing it through the 
creamy scum that the counter cur- 
rents form in spots here and there, under 
which the ouananiche lie in ambush for 
the insect life that comes down through 
the rapids and gathers in eddies on the 
surface. I soon caught on, and before 
long was making respectable casts, saw- 
ing the line, shuttlelike, back and forth 
with my left hand as I drew the fly through 
the water. Meanwhile I had got soaking 
wet from the waist down, from the in- 
cessant dashing and surging of the swell 
thrown out by the furious rapids a few 
yards beyond. 

I had 3 or 4 rises, but either was not 
quick enough with the rod or was too 
quick with the reel, and the gamy fighter 
would get away every time. Several times 
Joe took the rod to relieve my tired arm 
and every time he did so he would get a 
strike, after which he would magnanimous- 
ly put the rod in my hands for me to 
land what was invariably a well hooked 
fish. That was all right, but I was get- 
ting tired of that sort of attention, even 
though an amateur of amateurs. With a 
determination to do or die I once more 
took the rod, and did not yield it again 
that afternoon. 

It was nearly 5 o'clock when I made my 
first strike that held fast, and I was 
more than proud. Morel scooped a 
handsome 3 pound fish into the landing 
net at the end of a 20 minute fight. 
I caught 3 more before we quit, and we 
returned to the Island House with 9 beau- 
ties, 4 of which were to my credit. I lost 
fully a dozen during the afternoon, which 
in all probability a more experienced an- 
gler would have landed. Mrs. Wife was 
surprised to see the result of the after- 
noon's sport, which averaged 2 pounds 
each, and still more surprised to learn 
that I had hooked my share; all of which, 
together with the undue attention which 
the blackflies had devoted to her during 
her half day's sojourn alone, settled the 
question of her accompanying me in the 
morning. 

Shortly after 7 o'clock the next morning 



we embarked for a 10 mile sail in the 
canoe, old Joe in the stern, young Joe in 
the bow, my wife and me back to back. 
The wind was blowing stiffly and we scud- 
ded down the first 3 or 4 miles of the Dis 
charge, in the center of a swift though 
smooth current. It is difficult to describe 
the sensation of shooting over the water in 
a bark so fragile that it seems to draw 
scarcely an inch of water. The rapidity of 
the descent and the smooth, oily surface of 
the unbroken current created the impres- 
sion that invisible hands were reaching up 
from below to drag the canoe under. 

There were 2 short, sharp rapids to be 
run before the portage around the grande 
chute is reached. These the guides will 
run willingly with one passenger, but not 
with 2. Each of these rapids involves a 5 
minute walk through the woods on the 
mainland. These were taken by my wife 
and me in turn, while the canoe shot around 
and clown with the other. Following the 
channel of the discharge a few miles far- 
ther down, across the stream from and be- 
low the long portage of the previous day, 
we arrived at the head of the grande chute, 
at the foot of which we fished the day be- 
fore and whither we were again bound, 
although I had no idea at the time just 
how we were to get there in a canoe. 
This portage is a comfortable footpath, 
cut through the woods and about a mile 
long. There, for the first time, we saw 
the birch bark canoe hoisted on the should- 
ers of the guide, young Joe. He trotted 
off with it, while we came after with old 
Joe, who carried the rods and the lunch- 
eon. We could hear the roar of the rap- 
ids as we walked, but could not see them 
for the dense underbrush. Soon we were 
at the end of the portage and the canoe 
was put down on the margin of a beauti- 
ful cove with as picturesque a beach of 
fine sand as may be found along the At- 
lantic coast. 

Then we reembarked, amid the roar of 
the rapids, which was still in our ears, 
though we could not see the waters. A 
few swift strokes of the paddle and we 
rounded a point, which took us in full 
view of the rapids themselves and the im- 
mense boulders from which we had fished, 
the day before on the opposite side of an 
expansive bay about 34 of a mile wide, 
which had been worn away by the unceas- 
ing action of the waters in their mad plung- 
ing through the rapids of the grande chute. 
A strong desire to turn back filled me for 
an instant, but there was no time for ar- 
gument, as we were already well on our 
way across the bay, and thereby to a cer- 
tain extent dispersed the fearful force of 
the rapids which had created it. Ten min- 
utes more and we were in the midst of 



no 



RECREATION. 



them, the canoe pointing now this way, 
now that, now up the stream, now down, 
ever guided by the unerring stroke of the 
paddle and prevented from what seemed 
inevitable swamping ; rising to the waves 
with a peculiar sweep of the pad- 
dles that fairly lifted the canoe 
out of the water. Thus we zigzagged 
across the turbulent flood. To have at- 
tempted a passage by a direct line would 
have meant certain destruction. How the 
guides do it, no one knows. It was enough 
for us that we were safely shot across the 
stream without shipping a drop of water, 
and for what? Ouananiche! 

Old Joe evidently thought I had received 
sufficient education the previous day, for 
on our arrival at the pools at the foot of 
the rapids he left me without a word, 
with young Joe as an attendant, and, like 
a gallant voyageur, devoted himself entirely 
to "de Madame," as he deferentially called 
her. 

He escorted her to the same rock where 
I had received my first lessons. There 
old Morel labored as patiently as he had 
with me, hooking the first fish or 2 and 
handing her the rod while he used the 
landing net. 

Domestic responsibilities have rendered 
Mrs. Wife self possessed and dignified, 
with an unruffled calm which, to use a 
metropolitan metaphor, seldom slops over; 
hence, I needed no explanation when to 
the rock where I stood submerged to my 
knees on a lower ledge, some 50 yards dis- 
tant from her, came a muffled scream and 
I saw her dancing a hornpipe in a space 
where good footing was dependent on re- 
maining quiet. She had hooked her first 
fish and he was describing graceful curves 
in the air, leaping half a dozen times in 
succession, in a vain endeavor to dislodge 
the hook, the water dripping from his 
brilliant sides as he fell back each time 
with a splash. She played with him fully 
15 minutes, Joe finally landed him. The 
fish weighed 2]/ 2 pounds. 

Half an hour later Mrs. Wife hooked a 
pair of them, one on each fly, and they 
made a beautiful display as they fought 
for their liberty. She had the good sense 
to hand the rod to Joe, but even that old 
veteran was not equal to the task, a very 
difficult one I have since learned, and both 
fish got away, one taking the flv with him. 
It was a case of the survival of the fittest, 
and the gallant fish earned their liberty. 

In the face of rare luck, we stopped to 
lunch, on ouananiche and bacon, crackers 
and cheese, with a hard boiled egg on the 
side, washed down with strong tea. We 
both acknowledged that we had fared 
worse many a time and paid more. Short- 
ly after noon heavy clouds began to scud 
across the sky and settled down to a heavy 



rain, which continued the rest of the after- 
noon. The wind and waves carried the 
scum away from the rocks from which we 
had been fishing; so, packing up our stuff, 
we took the canoe to a small island near, 
where we remained the rest of the day. 
I had gone around on one side of the islet 
to tfy my luck away from the others, when 
Joe came after me in a hurry, saying ex- 
citedly, 

"Big feesh jomp in de foam." 

I hastened back just in time to see a 
tremendous fellow leap fully 3 feet in the 
air from the middle of a broad patch of 
scum about 35 feet distant. Even as I 
cast for the spot, up he came a second 
time. I had learned to cast fairly well, 
and it was with comparative ease, which 
brought a shout of approval from old 
Morel, that I pulled it through, leaving a 
little wake behind. Another cast, hoping 
and praying that my good angel might be 
somewhere around, when down went the 
tip of my rod till it touched the water. 
Something ripped out from between my 
lips which Madame would not repeat, and 
the battle was on. 

Six times that magnificent fish leaped 
from the water, into which I had walked 
waist deep in my excitement, and at each 
jump I received an electric shock which 
made me feel as if I had touched a live 
wire. I have not the words to express my 
sensations at that moment. The incident 
stands alone, absolutely unique. Nothing 
in any other of my experiences can be 
compared with it. I played that fish, or 
rather he played me, 32 minutes, by Mrs. 
Wife's watch, before he yielded the fight 
and came into the landing net. 

"Big feesh," indeed, that "jomp in de 
foam." He weighed 4 pounds, 7 ounces 
that night at the Island House. He was 
the biggest catch of the day and to have 
remained longer would have been like re- 
turning to an entree after dessert had been 
served. I was satisfied to return^ feeling 
much as the old patriarch probably felt 
when he said, "Lord now lettest thou thy 
servant depart in peace." 

For the first time during the day 
I stopped to admire the quarry 
I had taken. How beautiful the peacock 
blue shade and hues that o'erspread his 
sides, but that soon disappeared, giving 
place to well defined silver and black, 
with the black crosses and spots. How 
graceful and artistic the lines which tap- 
ered the body, creating the impression of 
length and weight ! Noting also the 
breadth of the powerful tail and the strong 
fins, it was not difficult to understand 
how he held his own in the swirling eddies 
of the grande chute. 

When Morel gathered up the spoils 
there were 26 fish, aggregating 52 pounds, 



TWO TENDERFEET IN THE GRAND DISCHARGE. 



in 



the majority running about 1^2 pounds 
each. Several weighed 3 pounds and some 
but little less. We lost at least 15, and 
some half dozen we threw back because 
of their small size. 

As we started away from the little is- 
land, homeward bound, we had an oppor- 
tunity of witnessing once more the almost 
superhuman skill of our guides in navigat- 
ing the canoe. In a driving rain, with a 
stiff wind blowing across the bay, we 
started to cross the foot of the rapids we 
had come over in the morning. It was 
a different proposition in the face of fit- 
ful gusts of wind, which added to the tur- 
bulence and choppiness of the water, to 
say nothing of over 50 pounds additional 
weight in the canoe. Our crossing in the 
morning had been made in silence. I 
noticed this time, however, that every few 
minutes old Joe would drop a word in 
the musical French patois. It would be 
answered by an eloquent "Oui" from the 
son, immediately followed by some par- 
ticular stroke of the paddle which turned 
the canoe at right angles from its appar- 
ent course, to hold it motionless amid the 
churning foam and avoid running into the 
crest of an oncoming wave which threat- 
ened to engulf the frail craft and which 
in the twinkling of an eye would either 
be turned aside by a sudden change in the 
current or cut off at the crest by a stroke 
of the paddle. It was marvelous ! While 
my heart nearly stopped beating I simply 
sat still and wondered at the almost mir- 
aculous feats performed by those voy- 
ageurs, and whether we would really reach 
the shore without a mishap. Mrs. Wife 
said it was enough to give a person 
"nerves," and I agreed with her. 

On the way down in the morning we 
had passed though a portion of the chan- 
nel which was divided by a small island 
about 100 feet from the mainland, and not 
far above the head of the long portage. 
A big rock jutted out from the main shore 
at a point midway of the length of the 
island opposite. I noticed that we shot 
past the little island like a streak, without 
appreciating that we would have to pass 
the same way on our return. On the way 
back that evening we hugged the shore 
closely all the way up to the projecting 
rock in order to avoid the effect of the 
wind and current. When we reached that 



point, however, it was more than apparent 
that no canoe could be paddled up that 
short ascent by any 2 men. The stream 
was running like a mill race and eddying 
around the big rock like a whirlpool. 

What to do was the question in my 
mind, when like a flash the canoe was 
turned just before the rock was reached 
and shot almost at right angles across the 
stream, both men bending to their paddles 
with all their might and main. Just as it 
seemed inevitable that we would be swept 
past the lower end of the island and into 
the rapids, a final stroke sent the nose of 
the canoe within a foot of the sheer rock 
and another turn brought it up alongside 
as gracefully as a swan. 

"Bon!" ejaculated old Morel, as he 
braced his paddle against the rock and 
drew a long breath, and I understood just 
enough French to appreciate how he felt. 
The remainder of the run home was une- 
ventful, except that the rain continued 
falling heavily. By the time we reached 
the Island House there was about an inch 
of water in the bottom of the canoe, and 
we were sitting in it ; but there were 26 
ouananische and 2 18 carat guides keep- 
ing us company and we cared nothing. 

The next day found us on board the 
Mistassini on . our way back to the Rob- 
erval. Beemer spoke the truth when he 
said our experience in ouananiche fishing 
would spoil us for future sport with the 
fly. We had been initiated at the top of the 
ladder and further experience would be in 
the nature of a retrogression, unless we 
should return to Lake St. John, for we 
had met and conquered the greatest game 
fish in North America. 

As I look back on that day's glorious 
sport at the foot of the rapids of the 
grand e chute in the Grand Discharge, it 
makes me feel humble. When I think 
of the gall I had to venture to lure that 
greatest of all game fishes without any 
experience in handling a rod or casting a 
fly, I shudder. That it should have been 
on the cards for a genus loppestre like me 
to land that kingly 4^ pounder that came 
to net at the eleventh hour, and in one 
brief day to demolish the traditions of 
sharps who have been writing for years 
on the experience and expertness neces- 
sary to angle successfully for the ouanan- 
iche, makes me proud. 



Her Fashionable Friend — Why didn't you 
bring the baby? 

The New Mamma — I did want to, but 
there wasn't room in the carriage for her 
and my doggie too. — Chicago Record-Her- 
ald. 



WILD SHEEP IN CAPTIVITY. 



HARRY E. LEE. 



On a recent hunting trip in Old Mexico 
I had the pleasure of spending a few days 
in El Paso, the gateway to that old and lit- 
tle known but interesting country. While 
enjoying the balmy sunshine and making 
the acquaintance of a number of royal 
Southern sportsmen, I had the good for- 
tune to be allowed the privilege of taking a 
photograph of this noble little animal. The 
history of its capture is as follows : 

In February, 1902, Pedro Sorrillo, a 
Mexican, was hunting in the Cerro Chino 
mountains, State of Chihuahua, and shot 
the mother sheep. The lamb was only a 
few days old at the time and was carried in 
the saddle in the hot sun without food or 
water. At night a domestic she goat was 
procured for it, and it nursed readily. It 
was kept with this goat continuously until 
last June, when Mr. C. H. Townsend. of 
Townsend-Barber Zoological Company, El 
Paso, happened to be in that section o*f 
Mexico on a hunting and exploring trip, 
and secured the prize from the Mexican. 
Mr. Townsend took the lamb 20 miles in a 
carriage to the railroad and over 90 miles 
by rail to El Paso, simply tied with a small 
rope around its neck. 

The day before getting on the train with 
his little charge Mr. Townsend had an in- 
teresting experience, and it was only 
through good fortune that he did not lose 
the lamb altogether. In the middle of a 
burning afternoon, while tied in the shade 
of the rude box car station at Sabinal, it 
broke its rope and started for the hills. Un- 
fortunately for Mr. Townsend, there was 
no saddle horse near, and he was compelled 
to give it chase on foot. Those who have had 
experience in following a mountain lamb, 
even though it be of tender age, realize 
what Mr. Townsend had to contend with. 
I once had a chase of that kind in Alaska 
and still bear marks of my rough scramble 
over rocks and crevices which it seemed 
impossible for the little creatures to at- 
tempt ; but they bounded on, heedless of the 
seeming danger, and soon were safe on the 
ledges far below, where no human, foot 
could tread. Mr. Townsend was more for- 



tunate, and after a run of over half a mile 
through the low brush and prickly pears, 
he finally caught the lamb. It felt the sepa- 
ration from its adopted goat mother and 
wanted to nurse. 




MEXICAN WILD LAMB. 

In El Paso Mr. Townsend got 2 she goats 
for it. As soon as it became acquainted 
with them, which took several days, it 
nursed energetically, dropping on its knees 
like a flash and butting the udder repeat- 
edly with its head. Since June it has been 
eating alfalfa hay, green grass, oats 'morn- 
ing and evening, raw potatoes, fruit, bread; 
in fact, almost anything, even to cigarette 
stumps, which it ate with a relish. It has 
a great fondness for jumping. When but a 
very small lamb it could strike the walls of 
its enclosure, over 6 feet' from the ground, 
and it now jumps much higher. It is a clean, 
healthy animal, full of life, yet docile as a 
tame sheep. It should by all means be in 
one of our large zoological parks, as it is a 
rare specimen, and from personal experi- 
ence I find that these animals are scarce and 
becoming more so every day. The few that 
are left will be exterminated unless imme- 
diate and stringent laws are enacted for 
their protection. 



First Actress — I was beside myself with 
rage. # 

. Second Actress— You certainly were. 
Why, you quivered even in the places 
where you were upholstered. — Life. 
112 



THE BATTLE OF THE PRONGHORNS. 



W. T. HEDDON. 



The early part of last October I was 
welcomed by my friend Parker as I alight- 
ed from a Pullman which had conveyed 
me safe to a little hamlet in Wyoming. 
The hour required to drive 7 miles to the 
R. B. ranch was fully occupied by queries 
and replies relative to prospects for the 
morrow and in recalling our experiences of 
the 3 preceding autumns together, hunting 
the keen eyed and fleet footed antelope, 
which without doubt is the most difficult 
of approach of all American game animals. 
Mr. Parker is the most successful ante- 
lope hunter it has been my good fortune to 
know. Not only does he thoroughly un- 
derstand the nature of these animals, but 
he is a born plainsman and mountaineer, 
and an excellent rifle shot at game, either 
standing or running. It is rare, indeed, 
to secure shots at antelope in that section 
at less than 200 yards, as the country af- 
fords too many comparatively level ranges 
on which grows that far famed, sweet buf- 
falo grass. 

Breakfast over the next morning, we 
saddle and bridled 2 cow ponies, strapped 
our scabbards containing 30-30 rifles to the 
saddles, mounted and with wishes of 
"good luck, boys ; sorry I can not join 
you" from the good wife of my friend, who 
is equally at home in divided skirts in the 
saddle, chasing a crippled antelope, or in 
evening dress in the ballroom doing a 
2-step with her most obedient servant, we 
"gave 'em the steel" and were off. For 
the first time in nearly a year I was speed- 
ing over the former haunts of the buffalo 
and the rightful owner of our country, 
the red man. How clear, cool and pure 
the air ! Away to the Southwest some 70 
miles the peaks of snow-capped mountains 
were plainly seen, and I was speechless 
with thrills of a true happiness from which 
comes no reactive sting. 

We passed over bluffs on which thou- 
sands of warriors had camped, and from 
which they had cautiously scanned the 
country for miles. The only remaining 
evidences of their last stand for possession 
of this former hunters' paradise, against 
the hand of the white man's greed, clothed 
in the pretext of "advancement of civili- 
zation," are the circles of flat stones used 
to hold down the circular edges of their 
tepees. Numerous horns of our buffalo 
scattered about are still another evidence 
that civilization has mowed a swath in the 
heart of every lover of nature. 

When about 3V2 miles from the ranch we 
sighted a herd of 15 antelopes about 400 
yards away. Unfortunately for us they re- 



turned the compliment. Before we could 
get a rise of ground between us, they had 
taken fright and had run up a hill from 
which they could make a more thorough 
observation. There they halted an instant 
and while we were filling the air with re- 
grets, Parker, who is the taller and could 
see into sink holes where I could not, ex- 
claimed, 

"See those bucks fight !" 

Rising in my stirrups, I saw, some 100 
yards to the left of the herd, 2 bucks in 
deadly combat. Two other antelopes were 
running around and past them, back and 
forth, as we supposed in an endeavor to 
warn them of impending danger. We both 
took in the situation in an instant, and 
without further words wheeled our horses 
and, riding rapidly out of their sight, cir- 
cled in such a manner as to cat the un- 
suspecting 4 off from the herd. When 
we again came in sight all 4 were still 
there, but the main bunch were running. 
What a fight ! Neither of us had ever 
before seen wild animals contesting for 
right as lord and master. At that point the 
ground was such that by advancing a few 
rods we would be under cover and could 
approach unseen to within 150 yards. 
Keyed to the highest pitch with excite- 
ment, not buck fever, I shouted, 

"Let's make a run !" and we did, for 
200 yards, in the meantime taking our 
rifles from their scabbards and preparing 
for action. We quickly dismounted, threw 
the reins over the ponies' heads, which is 
just as safe as tying them, and started, 
bare headed, on a run toward our certain 
victory. As soon as we came in sight the 
young buck and doe, which were cutting 
capers around their companions, circled 
past us at about 100 yards and joined the 
herd, then far away. What an opportunity, 
and ;how 2 hearts ached to give him the 
lead, but neither spoke, nor did we raise 
our rifles. Slackening our pace, we walked, 
in plain sight of our quarry, 25 yards 
more, and being within 125 yards, halted to 
shoot. We spoke not a word, but watched 
them separate and come together with 
heads down ; heard their horns clash and 
saw them locked. It was a grand and 
nobly fought battle, but both were destined 
to lose, for the next moment my friend 
raised his rifle and fired. It was not a kill 
and both bucks circled past us at full 
speed to join their band. I fired and 
missed. Parker fired. I shot again, and 
as my buck fell, in wildest excitement I 
shouted, 

"That's mine!" 



"3 



ii4 



RECREATION. 



Another shot, an exclamation, "Mine's 
the leader," a few war whoops, congratu- 
lations, my Eastman No. 4 shot a few times, 
our old reliable Marble hunting knives put 
into action, and it was all over. Our bucks 
lay within 10 yards of each other and 80 
yards from us, both hit near the heart; not 
because of wonderful skill, but it so hap- 
pened. Neither moved from where he fell, 
dying before we reached them to cut their 
throats. We would not have exchanged 
places with even a dining-car conductor or 
a prestidigitator. Our happiness was com- 
plete. We did not congratulate each other 
on account of any skill exhibited; indeed, 
there was none. Under ordinary circum- 
stances my friend would have killed both 



bucks, with 2 shots ; but he admitted, 
"Billie, I was never so excited in my life," 
and every real sportsman knows why we 
acted 15 years younger. 

What a chance for the camera, if we 
had only known ! There is no doubt we 
could have approached within a few feet 
of the fighters, but when we thought of my 
kodak it was too late to improve the op- 
portunity of a lifetime. 

Two days later the head of my buck was 
expressed to that world renowned taxider- 
mist, C. E. Aiken, of Colorado Springs, 
and it is now added to my collec- 
tion of trophies, each of which tells 
a silent story of the happiest days of my 
life. 



A PAIR OF SEATTLE RAZORBACKS 

This picture comes from Seattle, Wash., Halls will attempt to justify themselves 

and is accompanied by a newspaper clipping when assailed, but if I should print some 

stating that the pair of swine shown there- of the letters that have come to me from 

in are named D. H. and Virgil Hall. It their neighbors, they would know what 

is said that these men killed 150 ducks, 30 other people think of them. It is to be 




D. H. AND VIRGIL HALL. 



geese and several swans in 2 days. The hoped these 2-legged rooters may realize 

extent of the slaughter is not so bad as the that they have disgraced themselves and 

taste displayed by the men who would thus that they may reform. 

stand up and be photographed about the D. H. Hall is game hog No. 889 and 

corpses of their victims. Of course, these Virgil Hall is No. 890. — Editor. 



FROM THE GAME FIELDS. 

The man who quits when he gets enough, with plenty of game still in sight, is a real sportsman. 
THE NEWEST ANIMAL TRAPS. 



720,911. — Animal Trap. William Gabriel- 
son, Waldron, Mo., assignor of l / 2 to 
Erick Larson, Kansas City, Mo. Filed 
April 28, 1902. Serial No. 105,074. 
(No model.) 




Claim. — 1. In an animal trap, a frame, a 
pair of swinging jaws mounted pivotally 
thereon, transverse sitting-lugs 3 a on said 
jaws, a spring having an opening in its 
end, said opening embracing the radial 
portions of said jaws when the jaws are 
closed, a detent lever pivoted on said frame 
in position to hold said spring depressed, 
a slot in said lever, a trigger, a pin secured 
thereto and entering said slot ; said slot 
being of such a form that the movement 
of said lever when the trap is set will raise 
the trigger to an upright position, and that 
said slot will be engaged by said pin in 
such a manner as to hold said trigger and 
lever insecurely in set position. 

2. A frame, a pair of swinging jaws 
having radial portions mounted pivotally 
on said frame, transverse sitting-lugs 3 a 
mounted on said jaws, a U-shaped spring 
having one end thereof resting on said 
frame and its other end having an opening 
therein embracing said radial portions pro- 
vided with said lugs, when the jaws are 
closed ; a detent lever pivoted on said 
frame in position to hold said spring de- 
pressed, a slot in said lever, a trigger, a pin 
secured thereto and entering said slot; said 
slot being of such a form that the move- 
ment of said lever when the trap is set will 
raise the trigger to an upright position, and 
that said slot will be engaged by said pin in 
such a manner as to hold said trigger and 
lever insecurely in set position. 

721,321. — Animal Trap. Christopher C. 
Nesmith and Joel L. Brewer, Manches- 
ter, Ala. Filed November 26, 1902. Se- 
rial No. 132,954. (No model.) 
Claim. — In an animal trap of the class 
described the combination with a cage of a 
vestibule or passage way, having inclined 
end walls, openings formed in said end 
walls, pivoted drop doors adapted to close 
said openings, pivoted floor plates arranged 




in said passage way, the inner end of which 
are formed with interlocking fingers, coun- 
terbalancing weights fixed to the outer ends 
of said floor plates, said outer ends being 
adapted to close said pivoted drop door's by 
weight of an animal upon the inner end of 
the same, stop walls and flaring wings ar- 
ranged adjacent to the openings in said 
passage way, whereby the course of an ani- 
mal is directed to said openings, a door or 
opening, communicating between said pas- 
sage way and said cage, a downwardly in- 
clined guideway extending from said door 
to the floor of said cage, and a drop door 
for closing said door and guideway. 

726,140. — Animal Trap. John Campbell, 
Sr, Webster, N. Y. Filed July 15, 
1902. Serial No. 115,708. 




Claim. — 1. A trap comprising a body, a 
bottom, and an entrance chute, the lower 
terminals of the opposite sides of the body 
having loop devices loosely held thereby 
and adapted to be passed through meshes 
of the bottom, and removable keys passed 
through the loop devices of the body and 
disposed against under sides of the bot- 
tom ; also through a portion of the body 
and arranged against the outer ends of the 
chute, whereby the several parts of the 
trap may be quickly assembled or disas- 
sociated. 

723,100. — Animal Trap. James P. White, 
Mattoon, 111. Filed June 27, 1902. Se- 
rial No. 113,490. (No model.) 
Claim. — In an animal trap, the combina- 
tion of a box-like structure having one 



us 



n6 



RECREATION. 




open side, a gate pivoted at the top and 
across said opening adapted to swing up- 
wardly against the top of the box and to 
fall by gravity, a latch-plate pivoted to the 
box at an intermediate point near the bot- 
toms thereof, a stop for limiting the move- 
ment of the latch-plate, a latch secured to 
the latch-plate and adapted to engage the 
free end of the gate when the latch-plate is 
swung from the floor of the trap to the 
limit of movement defined by the stop. 

721,407. — Animal Trap. Wilhelm Wil- 
helms, B riming, Neb. Filed September 
29, 1902. Serial No. 125,245. (No mod- 
el.) 




Claim. — 1. An animal trap comprising a 
base with an opening, a spring-actuated 
choking loop movable thereover and a trig- 
ger disposed at right angles to said loop to 
engage the same. 

2. A spring-actuated choking loop mova- 
ble thereover and a trigger disposed at 
right angles to said loop to engage the 
same, and having a looped portion. 

3. A trigger disposed at right angles to 
said loop to engage the same, and having a 
looped portion provided with a cross bar. 

719,544. — Animal Trap. Pardon A. Whit- 
ney, Southington, Conn. Filed No- 
vember 28, 1902. Serial No. 133,149. 
(No model.) 




Claim. — 1. In a trap of the class specified 
the combination with the base, the spring, 
and the latch, of jaws pivoted at each end 
in the base, one of said jaws being pivoted 
in a lower plane than the other jaw. 

2. The combination with the base, the 
spring and the latch, of jaws pivoted in the 
base, one of said jaws being pivoted in a 
lower plane than the other at the spring 
end of the base. 

726,350. — Animal Trap. Samuel Robin- 
son, Monmouth, 111. Filed December 

2J, 1897. Serial No. 663,546. 




Claim. — 1. The combination of a base, 
a spring-actuated clamping jaw, a trigger 
located at the front of the base and pro- 
vided with a hook, and a latch pivotally 
secured at the rear end of the base and 
provided with a slot to receive the jaw, 
the toe of said latch extending forward in 
position to engage the hook of the trigger. 



IN THE PORT TOWNSEND DISTRICT. 

On previous trips up the Straits of San 
Juan and Puget sound I had admired the 
glorious view of the snow-topped Olympic 
mountains. Being told they were full of 
fish and game and but little known, I de- 
termined to have a try at them before those 
interesting conditions were changed. 

After exchanging a few letters on the 
subject with'Munro Wyckoff, game warden 
of Port Townsend district, I set out for 
that place with my usual outfit, relying on 
obtaining special articles, horses and sup- 
plies there. In that I was not disappointed, 
and finding Mr. Wyckoff familiar with the 
mountains, I secured his services as guide, 
with his brother, George, to take care of 
camp. Another brother, Lum, had recently 
been appointed ranger on the huge Govern- 
ment reserve, which comprises the central 
and best part of the Olympics, and I had 
the benefit of his experience as well. 

We decided to go in with pack horses 
as far as possible and establish a central 
permanent camp from which to foray 
through the country. The open season on 
grouse begins August 15; on elk, Septem- 
ber 1, and on deer, September 15. Owing 
to the frightful condition of the trail we 
made an early start and were 2 weeks going 
over ground which we covered in 2 days 
on our return. The winds and avalanches 
of winter had torn down and interlaced 
great trees by hundreds along the narrow 
canyon of the Big Quilicene river by which 



FROM THE GAME FIELDS. 



117 



we traveled, and it was necessary to send 
ahead men with saws and axes to cut a 
way through. 

The forest and undergrowth were dense, 
almost obscuring the sun. Black bear and 
grouse were numerous and the river was 
full of delicious trout. On reaching the 
summit of the divide between Quilicene 
and Dungeness rivers, at an altitude of 
6,000 feet, the country grew more open, 
with good feed for the horses, and snow 
on the peaks and sheltered spots. Deer 
were abundant. In an hour's stroll our 
first morning in camp I counted 10, the 
hills being fairly cut up by game trails. 
Bear and cougar sign were numerous, but 
these animals are too nocturnal in their 
habits to make hunting them a pleasure, 
though we saw several and shot a few. 
Near the salt licks the carcasses of fawns 
with torn throats gave evidence of the 
cougar's work. 

The hot days brought into life myriads 
of exceedingly fierce flies and mosquitoes, 
making it necessary to wear mosquito hats 
when in camp, but the chilly nights gaye 
respite from them and ensured good rest 
on luxurious beds of balsam fir boughs. 
We made our camp near a huge snow bank 
in which we refrigerated our meat and 
perishable supplies. Wild berries and 
flowers grew in profusion. Delicious soft, 
cold water was in abundance, forming 
lovely cascades and rills in every little 
canyon. 

Our permanent camp was on a shoulder 
of Mount Constance, midway between the 
summit and the East fork of Dungeness 
river, amid particularly grand scenery. A 
little climb morning or evening to the 
ridges would be amply repaid by sunrise 
or sunset effects on the clouds and snow- 
clad peaks simply indescribable. Mounts 
Olympus and Constance are the highest 
points in this range ; farther off could be 
seen the blue sound and straits, with Mount 
Baker and the Cascade range for a back- 
ground. 

In little secluded valleys, reached on 
foot, were bands of elk, often 50 or more, 
but we let them alone as it is almost im* 
possible to pack out a head or a quarter 
of meat from such a country. It is no trick 
at all to bag deer, some of the bucks being 
large, with grand heads; but the job of 
getting them to camp often makes the 
hunter wish he had missed his shot. 

An interesting animal thereabouts is the 
whistling marmot, a sort of huge prairie 
dog weighing 10 to 25 pounds. They are 
numerous and tame, and make hay like a 
farmer, cutting, drying and storing it. The 
Indians and some prospectors claim they 
are good eating, but most people seem 
prejudiced against them. 

These mountains are full of gold, silver, 



copper and iron, but the formation is so 
broken and travel so difficult that but few 
seek the prizes that are undoubtedly there. 

All the rivers, Docewallips, Quilicene, 
Dungeness, Elwah and Solduc, and Qui- 
nault and Crescent lakes are full of trout, 
from the tiny brook species to the giant 
Beardsley, including the rainbow, cutthroat 
and Dolly Varden. The bays along the 
sound afford 'the finest salmon trolling on 
the coast. Grouse and Chinese pheasants 
are numerous and are found in the open 
stubble fields. Some way should be devised 
to make their presence remunerative to the 
farmer. His grain suffers from the birds 
and his stock is frequently riddled by irre- 
sponsible shooters. Hence it is not strange 
that he prefers to see the birds destroyed 
rather than protected. 

Herbert Earlscliffe, Santa Barbara, Cal. 



HUNTING DEER IN MICHIGAN. 

Time : November 8th to 20th, 1899. Place : 
Schoolcraft county, Michigan. Party: Fish- 
er, Hyde, Gleason, Mason, Selous, Hillman, 
I and Bishop, the cook, whom we nick- 
named Rosie. 

We left the train at a point where the 
railroad passes close to a bend of Indian 
river. Willing hands were soon at work 
dragging boxes and tents to the bank, using 
a toboggan and 4 man team. Rosie, Fisher 
and I were detailed to put up the tent, 
while the team returned for another load. 
We sat our guns near and were busy at 
work, when suddenly we heard the bark 
of a dog, followed by cracking of brush. 
Then out jumped a buck, which ran up the 
steep bank on the opposite side of the river. 
We each had but one load in our guns. 
Rosie fired first and missed; then Fisher, 
another miss. By that time the buck had 
reached the top of the hill, only 15 rods 
from our tent, and instead of disappearing, 
as we had expected, he stopped, turned his 
heavily antlered head and calmly looked 
down on us, much more calmly than we 
looked at him. You are wondering what I 
was doing all that time? So were Rosie 
and Fisher. 

I use as my favorite deer gun my 12 
gauge Remington hammerless, with a 45.90 
rifle barrel inserted in one barrel. Previ- 
ous to that time I had used the rifle in the 
left barrel and buckshot in the right, which 
was cylinder bore ; but owing to my adop- 
tion of a new plan of loading buckshot for 
choke bore guns, I had changed the rifle 
to the right barrel. As the deer stopped, I 
took deliberate aim and pulled. No report. 
I broke open the gun, turned the shell and 
tried again. Still no report, for, of course, 
I had been pulling the wrong trigger, snap- 
ping the empty barrel which formerly held 
the rifle. After waiting a moment the 



u8 



RECREATION, 



buck lumbered over the hill and out oi 
sight forever. 

Our tent was up and everything in good 
order before night. We had agreed that 
the man who killed the first deer should be 
chief of the camp, consequently every 
man was off early for the hunt, tak- 
ing different directions. I crossed a stream 
and went West across a chopping into a 
large tract of hard wood. There was no 
snow, but I could see plenty of fresh signs. 
At a little after 8 o'clock I jumped a 
spike horn buck, which disappeared over a 
knoll after the first jump. The sound of 
his running ceased, and I knew he had 
stopped, as I could have seen him if he 
had run far, owing to higher ground that 
encircled us. I waited at least 5 minutes 
before I heard him. He had taken his back 
track and walked right back to the top of 
the knoll to see what had become of me. 
That time I pulled the right barrel and 
sent a 45 bullet into his breast, through 
his heart, and out at the fourth rib.* He 
ducked his head, dropped his tail and ran, 
crazy like, but fast, about 20 rods, then 
went down. Had I not been sure of him 
I could have stopped him with the buck- 
shot. This proved the only deer shot that 
day, so my right to be chief of camp was 
not disputed. 

The next day Fisher shot a big buck and 
a doe. After hanging them up he started 
down a logging road for camp, with his 
buck head on his back. Mason and I, who 
had come to him after his shooting, also 
started for camp, but through the woods 
parallel with the road. We had not gone 
y 2 mile before Mason jumped a whopping 
big buck, but on account of the underbrush 
he could not get a shot. The buck ran 
straight to Fischer, who got up on a log 
when he heard him coming and put a bullet 
through his neck, killing him instantly. 
Either of these bucks would weigh nearly, 
if not quite, 200 pounds. Strange as it 
may seem, Fisher got no more deer after 
that day. 

Owing to the fact that we had no snow, 
something unusual . for November in the 
Upper Peninsula, our party of 6 got only 9 
deer, all bucks but one ; but the fine weath- 
er made camping so pleasant that we all 
agreed it fully made up for the absence of 
snow. 

One of our party was no other than 
Percy Selous, who often contributed to 
Recreation. He was a hunter and trav- 
eler of wide experience, an accom- 
plished artist* naturalist, taxidermist, mas- 
ter of many languages, and, better still, a 
good fellow. We had a great joke on him 
one day. He was sitting on a chest in front 
of the tent, after a fruitless chase, and had 
been saying he was afraid he would not 
get a chance at a deer. Just then a mighty 
buck jumped with a splash into the river 



from the thick cover on the opposite side 
and ran down stream, not 30 feet from Se- 
lous. His gun was in the tent. He called 
* to Hillman and Mason, who were in the 
tent, to bring a gun quick. They did so, 
and fired several shots at the buck as he 
plunged about in the water, making for cov- 
er again. How we did roast Selous, only 
to hear him mutter, "Deuced hard luck! 
Beastly luck !" 

E. A. Kemp, Greenville, Mich. 

A BUFFALO HUNT. 
In August, 1883, I was working for a 
cattle outfit, which employed about 40 
men. We had just come off the spring 
roundup, where we had been for many 
weeks working about 22 hours a day and 
we had only recently caught up in our 
> communication with the Land of Nod. 
It was not many days until the once tired 
and worn out cowboy was thirsting for 
some excitement, and after a few fights 
between some of the boys over cards, sev- 
eral shooting scraps, in which, fortunate- 
ly, none were killed, I was informed by the 
horse wrangler that while riding in a cer- 
tain flat he had seen a large buffalo, bull. 
There was little, need of his urging me 
to accompany him on a buffalo hunt on 
foot, for our 300 cow ponies were out on 
the range recuperating, preparatory to the 
calf and beef roundup, which was to begin 
in a few days. Although unusual to hunt 
buffalo on foot, we were of that age when 
"any old way" went, and being expert pis- 
tol shots, we had no fear. Each of us ob- 
tained "Evans rifles and with- Colt's 45 
caliber revolvers, we went out. The buf- 
falo was lying down in an uncultivated 
meadow. To his left, extending in a semi- 
circle was a dry creek, whose banks were 
25 feet high. Up this bank my companion 
and I crawled and crept along some dis- 
tance toward his lordship, until we had- 
a good opportunity to open fire. He was 
then 150 yards away. We agreed to fire at 
the same time. Had we used our pistols we 
might have succeeded, but we chose the 
rifles, about which we knew little. After 
aiming steadily at his heart, we both shot 
simultaneously. His lordship arose, ma- 
jestically, looked about, shook his shaggy 
head, and as the smoke directed his at- 
tention to his pursuers, he came toward us. 
Keeping our eyes on this mighty beast, 
we at once attempted to manipulate the 
levers of our guns. Mine, curious to 
say, stuck; try as I might, I could not 
get another cartridge in and although I 
would not admit it, I seemed to be pos- 
sessed of that peculiar feeling known to 
persons realizing they are in a tight place. 
The buffalo ran 150 yards to where we 
were standing. My companion went to the 
right, I to the left, each hoping the bvfffalo 



FROM THE GAME EI ELDS. 



119 



would pursue the other fellow. Unfor- 
tunately for me I had in my right hip 
pocket a red cotton handkerchief, part of 
which protruded, and the bull singled me 
out as the person who had caused the pains 
in his side, for both bullets struck him v 
but too far back to produce instant death, 
and infuriated as he then was he came 
after me. I dropped the gun and although 
strapped around me was "old faithful' 
never once did I think to draw it and shoot 
his eyes out, as I could have done on oth- 
er occasions. The "hot path" was all that 
occurred to me 'then, and I ran as I never 
have run since, to the steep embankment. 
When I reached it my courage failed me; I 
preferred to be gored to death rather than 
jump 25 feet. In my quandary I con- 
tinued to run and every second the bull 
was gaining on me. Already I could feel 
his hot breath on the back of my neck, 
but when in the act of jumping to the 
apparently bottomless pit, I heard a shot 
to my right, a groan just behind me and 
the bull sank dead in his tracks, my com- 
panion having had time to get his second 
wind. 

After helping ourselves to some tender- 
loin steak and some of the shaggy mane 
for pillows for our beds, we retraced our 
steps to the ranch. My companion ever 
afterward asserted that he had more nerve, 
was the better marksman and hunter, and- 
was not in the least frightened after the 
bull got us in a corner ; I was, however, 
too grateful to him for the timely shot, to 
claim any credit in the escapade. 

Many years have passed since then, and 
I am still a hunter, having pursued all 
kinds of large game ; yet the incident re- 
lated is vivid in my memory. 

V. H. Miller, Cripple Creek, Colo. 



A QUIET STALK. 

I have for the last 2 years been a con- 
stant reader of Recreation and like the 
stand you take in regard to game hogs. I 
love to hunt large game, but prefer to stalk 
it and alone, matching my woodcraft 
against the cunning of the game. I have 
never used hounds and never shall use 
them ; it looks to me like taking an unfair 
advantage. 

In 'yj, when but 18 years old, I was a 
cowboy in Wyoming. Antelope and deer 
were abundant on the plains and elk and 
bighorn in the mountains. Every stream 
was full of trout. I was at what was once 
Millersville, at the confluence of Smith's 
and Black's fork rivers, 16 -miles North- 
east of Fort Bridges. Millersville was 
formerly a station of the overland pony ex- 
press, but at that time it contained only 2 
old log cabins and a log stable. An old- 
timer named Charles Bates and I were the 
only inhabitants. 



One morning, while riding down Black's 
fork, I saw a deer in the stream. The side 
of the river I was riding on was rocky and 
hilly, covered only with sage brush. The 
other side was a level bottom and, in the 
bend of the stream, was a thicket of willows 
and cottonwoods about 400 yards long and 
10 to 30 yards wide. I carried an old 
Sharps 50 caliber carbine, with front sight 
made of half an old copper cent. It was a 
good gun ; I never had a better. 

The deer s^w me as soon as I saw him, 
and slowly walked out and into the thicket. 
I could have shot him while he stood in the 
water, but did not. I concluded to get him 
later, to stalk him and give him a show for 
his life. I knew he would stay in that 
cover during the day, if not disturbed. 

At 3 that afternoon, taking an old pack 
horse, I was again on the hilly side of the 
thicket. I tied the horses to a sage brush, 
waded the stream, and began a careful 
stalking of the willows, most of the time on 
my hands and knees. I had covered nearly 
24 of the ground without finding the deer. 
The willows were so thick I could hardly 
see 10 yards and in some places I could 
not stand upright. In front of me lay a 
dead cottonwood trunk nearly 2^ feet in 
diameter. I carefully peered over it and 
ahead, Dut could see no deer. I placed one 
hand on the trunk, then the other that held 
the gun, and was just raising my body up 
on the trunk, when something jumped up, 
not 12 inches away. It was my buck. I 
could have caught him by the horns as he 
raised his head, for the surprise was mu- 
tual, but in an instant he was up and go- 
ing. I sprang up to shoot, but bumped my 
head on an overhanging limb, nearly break- 
ing my neck and sending me back to earth. 
Before I could get up again the deer was 
out of sight. 

I felt certain he would cross the stream 
where it was narrow and shallow at the 
lower end of the cover and make for the 
rough country on the other side. To think 
was to act. Being only about 10 feet from 
the bank I at once jumped into the water, 
which was there waist deep. The buck was 
where I expected to see him. He cleared 
the water at one bound, but fell dead on the 
farther shore, a bullet from my old 
Sharp's breaking his backbone. I dressed 
him, pulled him across the water and start- 
ed after the horses. 

I walked on the prairie side of the thick- 
et, leaving my rifle with the deer. On my 
way another deer jumped up just at the 
edge of the willows and away he went. 
While stalking the first deer I must have 
crawled within 20 feet of the second one 
without disturbing him. Even the report 
of my rifle, not 200 yards away, had not 
caused him to leave the brush. 

Frank Holz, Kansas City, Mo. 



120 



RECREATION. 



WEST OF THE ROCKIES. 

Since boyhood I have been a great lover 
of hunting and fishing. Have studied the 
habits of fishes and game, from the rabbit 
and quail of Ohio and Kentucky to the elk, 
deer, and mountain trout of the Rockies. 
In 1893 I traveled all through the National 
Park country, and had one of the best 
times of my life. We shot all the chickens 
we could use, from the wagon, and if it 
had not been out of season we could have 
done likewise with elk and deer. At every 
camp we caught all the trout we wanted, 
within 100 yards. 

What a difference in the same country 
now ! Last November Lieutenant Farrar, 
U.S.A., Charles and James Reilly, D. C. 
McGinty, I. M. Higley, Fred Kempton and 
I went to St. Anthony, Idaho ; secured 3 
guides, 2 wagons, one bobsled and 7 horses 
and went into that same country to get an 
elk before they should become extinct. We 
were almost snowed in; were lost 2 or 3 
times, and did not see any game whatever, 
except a few grouse. I never fired my 
gun on the trip. We were at the South- 
west corner of the National Park, and 
followed along the blazed line of the 
park North and East several miles. 

The sheep is the greatest enemy of the 
game, and incidentally of the outdoor 
sportsman. We can not make Eastern 
men, except those who come and see for 
themselves, realize the wholesale destruc- 
tion of the ranges by sheep. After a range 
has had sheep on it one year that settles the 
game proposition for at least 5 years. 
Game will not stay where sheep have been, 
and there are few places in this Western 
country, that have not been sheeped to 
death. The National Park is about the 
only place left. The game will leave this 
country in the near future, and it will go 
North ; because in a few years there will 
be no range in the South. The average 
Eastern man would not believe sheep could 
be run in such brushy, rugged places as 
they are unless he saw the sheep or the 
effects of them. The effect is plainly seen 
several years after the sheep have once 
been over a range. It is wonderful how 
the herders manage their flocks in such 
places. They take sheep any place a man 
can go. It is a small expense to the sheep 
owner to run his sheep. Two herders can 
take care of 5,000 to 6,000 head. They get 
about $30 each a month, and the owner can 
lose 50 per cent, of his flock each year and 
still come out a winner, with the privileges 
he has. 

We hear of the wonderful abundance of 
game in the Jackson Hole country, but 
what does it cost to get a chance at it? 
You have to pay a license of $40 to the 
State of Wyoming ; , and each man in the 
party must have a guide, at $5 a day and 



board. If the present method is continued, 
in 10 years the elk will be like the buffalo, 
we will see them in shows, parks, and zo- 
ological gardens. 

Chas. E. Wood, Salt Lake, Utah. 



TWO GOOD SAMARITANS. 

Here is a letter written by a 15 year old 
boy to his father in this city : 

Inlet, N. Y. 
Dear Father: 

Gerald and I have turned animal doctors. 
This is the way it came about. 

Grandma wanted to go on top of Nipple- 
top mountain and I had to guide her. 
Gerald went with us. We were near the 
top when we heard a noise in the bushes. 
We looked and there was a deer struggling 
to get away. He could not use his hind 
legs at all and we walked right up to him ; 
a splendid big buck. He had a small 
wound in the middle of his back, but it 
was not from a bullet. Then we looked 
back about 100 feet and saw where he had 
been lying under a dead tree and a big 
branch with a little spike, or knot, on it 
had fallen and hit him right in the back, 
paralyzing his hind legs. The wound only 
bled a few drops. We saw he could not 
live, as he would starve and he could not 
drag himself, either; so Gerald went back 
to get a man and an axe, thinking we 
could make a stretcher and carry the deer 
to Kennell's barn. When Gerald reached 
home they told him we could not do that, 
as it is against the law to take a live deer 
from -the woods. There ought to be ex- 
ceptions to such a law. 

All we could do was to take the deer 
some hay and grain and pick ferns and put 
them before him. That night it rained 
furiously. The next day, Monday, we put 
on rubber coats and took a bag of hay 
and grain and went out to the deer again. 
When we got there we found him in a foot 
of water, where he had been all night. 
There was not much life in him then, but 
we dragged him about 50 feet, to a place 
where the water would drain off. There 
we made him a bed of ferns and hay, rub- 
bed off from him all the water we could 
with our hands, and ripped open the bag 
and tied it on him. 

When we were doing this the deer 
looked on and you could see how 'he appre- 
ciated it. He did not offer to harm us in 
any way, any more than a dog would. The 
deer will not eat anything and I fear he 
will die in spite of all we can do. If we 
could take him in a warm barn, I know he 
would live. I tried to call up Ned Ball, 
the game protector, but can not get him. 
We are going up again to-day, to make a 
roof over the deer, out of a bark pile that 
is near. It is not raining to-day, but -looks 



FROM THE GAME FIELDS. 



121 



as if it was going to. In my next letter I 
hope I can tell you the deer is alive. 
Your loving son, 

Clarence. 



prised to see such a large black bear in- 
stead of the deer. 

S. R. Harris, Grand Haven, Mich. 



MORE THAN WE EXPECTED. 

In the early days in Northern Michigan, 
from Grand Rapids to the Straits of Mack- 
inac, was a dense forest. It was then I 
engaged in hunting, trapping and fishing. 
I worked, through the summer, and in the 
fall took my traps, gun, and a few camp 
utensils, a small supply of provisions, and 
started North for the season's hunting and 
trapping. I made a shanty of hemlock 
bark, covered with hemlock boughs, and in 
one end, with blue beech sticks and clay 
I made a little fireplace, which answered 
for both cooking and heating. In the other 
end of the shanty I made a bunk of hem- 
lock boughs and marsh grass. This was 
my home for the season, and sometimes for 
several seasons. Those were the most en- 
joyable days of my life, as game was abun- 
dant. One fall, about 1874, in Osceola 
county, Marve Anton, Frank Buck and 
I got off the train at Leroy, and with 
our luggage on our backs, followed a blazed 
trail through the woods to Rose lake. 
There we built our hunting shanty and put 
everything into first class shape for the 
season's work. Several days were spent in 
fishing and duck shooting, as it was still 
early in the season and the weather warm. 
We found acorns abundant. There was 
one oak ridge 2 miles from camp where 
deer were working, so I proposed going 
up there at night and getting one. My 
chums were somewhat timid of the screech- 
ing owls and preferred daylight, so I got 
up in the morning about 2.30,, took a lunch 
in my pocket, dressed warm and started 
for the ridge, leaving word with the boys 
that if they heard 3 shots in succession, to 
come at once, as I might need help. I 
reached the place selected and sat down 
under a red oak tree. Everything was 
quiet, but, as I supposed, the birds were 
getting uneasy in the tree above, for pieces 
of bark fell sometimes ; but I could hear 
a deer a short distance away, so I did not 
notice the work overhead. I could see 
the glitter of a big buck's horns in the 
moonlight, and waited for him to come 
close. As I sat there a piece of falling 
bark nearly knocked my hat off. I looked 
up slowly, not to attract attention, and saw, 
on a large limb, a huge black bear. The 
deer forgotten, I bounded away from the 
tree. I had a double barrel muzzle loading 
rifle. Cocking it, I drew a bead on the 
bear's eye as best I could in the moonlight 
and fired. Down came the bear, so, load- 
ing, I fired both barrels to call the boys. 
KVhen they came they were greatly sur- 



A PLEA FOR THE SMALL GAME. 

All around us we see the most wanton de- 
struction of those animals and birds which add 
beauty, music and interest to every bit of wood- 
land, swamp and meadow. 

The rifleman desiring practice, the small boy 
with his 22, the farmer who associates every ani- 
mal and bird with damage to his crops, and the 
city man who, having a holiday, goes out to "kill 
something," are slowly but surely exterminating 
wild life. 

If these people could only be induced to lay 
aside their guns and go to the woods with tele- 
scope and camera and a desire for intimate ac- 
quaintance with the denizens of forest and 
swamp, how much more interest they would find 
in life! How much knowledge of scientific worth 
they would acquire! 

The rifleman would then shoot only at ver- 
min, the small boy would grow up a naturalist, 
the farmer would learn how few creatures really 
injure his crops and how many protect them, 
and the city man would have photos of real in- 
terest to remind him of days afield. 

The average farmer knows little or nothing of 
the wild creatures he sees every day. If he 
sees a woodpecker in his orchard, he remarks, 
"there's that darned woodpecker peckin' holes in 
my trees," and goes for his gun, never thinking 
of the little borer drilling into his tree's vitals, 
on which the bird desires to make its breakfast. 

If he finds a skunk in his fields he shoots the 
"pesky brute" at once for fear some night it 
might come near his mongrel fowls, never dream- 
ing that the skunk is ridding his fields of insects. 
Better build a skunk-proof hen-house and let the 
animal continue its good work. 

Most people regard all hawks as fair marks, 
calling all hen-hawks, whereas there are but 2 
hen-hawks among all the common species; the 
Cooper's and the sharp shinned. The others do 
an immense amount of good by destroying insects 
and vermin. A safe test is to see if they visit 
the hen-house. 

Some say "shoot the red squirrels, they eat 
birds' eggs." Didn't red squirrels eat birds' eggs 
before man came on the scene? Yet the number 
of birds did not diminish. No! rather leave the 
red squirrels alone. Man has upset the balance of 
nature enough already. 

If instead of shooting every animal committing 
a real or imaginary offense against their property 
men would weigh their good work against their 
crimes, and only fire when the latter overbal- 
anced the former, a host of beneficial and neutral 
creatures would be spared. 

If people would only study more and kill less, 
wild life would soon abound about us and we 
should not leave to our successors deserted woods, 
voiceless meadows, and swamps whose deathly 
stillness would be only broken by the croaking 
of the dismal frog. — A. B. K., in the Cornwall, 
Ont., Standard. 



AN ENCOUNTER WITH A LYNX. 
I have just returned from a hunting 
trip to the Boston mountains in Northern 
Arkansas. There were 4 in our party, 
and, excepting one untoward incident, we 
had a delightful time. The mountains are 
high and well watered, and game is abun- 
dant. The region is, however, difficult to 
reach. We left the railroad at West 
Plains, Mo., and took a stage from there 
to the Mountain House, 60 miles dis- 
tant. Thence we drove 40 miles to our 



122 



RECREATION. 



destination, over as rough a road as can 
be found this side of the Rockies. 

The afternoon of our second day m 
camp I took my rifle and set out alone to 
see what I could find. After climbing 
steep mountains and scrambling over 
rocks for several hours, I came across a 
bunch of 9 turkeys. I succeeded in kill- 
ing one, and then, it being almost dark, I 
started back. When nearing camp some- 
thing struck me a terrific blow on the 
shoulder, knocking me down. When I re- 
gained my feet, I found myself face to 
face with a lynx, or bob cat, as it is called 
in the South. I fired at him and missed. 
He made a dash for me while I was try- 
ing to force another cartridge into the 
breech. The shell stuck and put my gun 
temporarily out of commission. Using the 
weapon as a club I soon drove the cat up a- 
tree, but not before the brute had slit the 
legs of my trousers and torn most of the 
flesh from the back of my left hand. I 
managed to get a shell into my gun, and, 
after 3 unsuccessful attempts, killed the 
lynx. 

I presume the animal was really after 
the turkey when he made his first leap, 
but he certainly made things interesting 
for me awhile. Fortunately my hand is 
not crippled, but it will be badly scarred 
as long as I live. 

Dr. J. W. Bell, Dayton, O. 

This story of an encounter with a lynx 
is a most remarkable one. For many years 
I have refused to believe any of the num- 
erous newspaper yarns about these animals 
as well as panthers, black bears and wolves 
attacking people. In fact, I have investi- 
gated several such reports and have been 
able to ascertain definitely that they were 
entirely false. This story, however, is dif- 
ferent. It has the ring of truth, in it, and 
I can not doubt it. In a subsequent letter 
Dr. Bell gives the names of a number of 
persons in Indiana and Ohio who will 
vouch for his veracity. Dr. Albert Gar- 
ver, of Mountain Home, Ark., was with 
Dr. Bell's party and dressed the wounded 
hand. — Editor. 



IN THE EARLY DAYS. 

Away back in the 70's much of the traffic 
of the Northwest was carried on by steam- 
boats which drew their supply of fuel from 
wood yards strung along the river. The 
Northwest at that time was full of hostile 
Indians, so a man, to run a woodyard, 
needed to be brave and cool. It was a life 
of constant danger. 

Mike Duvall was such a man. He ran 
a wood yard on the North bank of the Mis- 
souri between Cow island and Fort Carrol. 
The last boat of the season had gone down 
and Mike and his rtien were supplied for 



the winter except for meat. No one then 
ever thought of buying mjat beyond bacon 
now and then as a change, or a slice for 
the beans; buffalo, deer, elk and antelope 
were abundant. 

One afternoon Mike asked the temporary 
cook how much meat he had and was told 
there was only one saddle of venison left. 
This was urgent, so Mike shouldered his 
Winchester 45-75 and paddled across the 
river, heading for the sources of some 
creeks pouring into the river farther away. 
This was a favorite ground for mule deer. 

Just as he got to the head of a draw he 
discovered a buffalo cow feeding near the 
head of another coulee, and he saw that 
by going back a little he could creep close 
to her. Stealthily he crawled along till 
within 100 yards and fired. She ran as if 
untouched for 50 yards, then rolled over. 
Mike walked over to cut her throat and 
was just bending over her when ping! went 
a bullet so close that he could feel its 
wind. He fell as if shot and instantly the 
report reached him from a clump of bushes 
150 yards away. Mike lay motionless a 
long time and was at last rewarded by see- 
ing his enemy crawling to him over the 
hill and within 60 yards. As the Indian 
saw no signs of life 'near the cow he seemed 
to gather courage, and when within 50 yards 
Mike sprang up, as he says, to see how the 
spalpeen "would like the Ink o' my ghost." 
The Indian was so startled that he dis- 
charged his weapon into the ground "for- 
ninst" himself. Before the poor devil had 
tirne to do anything old "Meat in the Pot" 
spoke and there was one more good Indian. 

Mike dragged the good Indian into a 
washout, took his scalp and then cutting off 
as much of the cow as he could carry, went 
back for help for the rest. Being asked 
as to the scalp he replied, "Be jabers, I kilt 
some carrion as well as the cow." 

M. F. Hackett, Lakeview, Mont. 



THE HOG RECORD BEATEN. 
Havre de Grace, Md. — Duck shooting has been 
poor on the Susquehanna flats this spring. Yes- 
terday, however, Capt. William I. Poplar and his 
brother killed and picked up 122 ducks within 30 
or 40 minutes. Of these, 82 were canvasbacks. 
This is a phenomenal shooting record, but the men 
had their chance and improved it. The ducks 
fairly swarmed around them while the men kept 
their boxes in position. — Baltimore Record. 

I wrote Captain Poplar asking as to the 
truth of this report and he replied : 

My brother, Jesse D. Poplar, and I set 
out at daylight and were not able to shoot 
more than an hour when the tide and cur- 
rent made us take up. The ducks darted 
faster than we could load our guns and 
we killed them when they came. We gath- 
ered 122, of which 82 were canvasbacks. 
It was the greatest hour's shooting we ever 
had. The ducks flew and darted well. 



FROM THE GAME FIELDS. 



123 



We used 2 single boxes about 750 decoys. 
That broke the record of any shooting on 
the flats, especially on canvasbacks. 
Capt. William H. Poplar, Havre de Grace, 
Md. 

The dispatch says : 

"Duck shooting has been poor on the 
Susquehanna flats this spring." Then the 
reporter proceeds to laud a pair of bristly 
brutes, who killed 122 ducks in 40 minutes. 

It is because such slaughter as these 
Poplar porkers committed has been going 
on for the past 20 years that duck shoot- 
ing is now so poor everywhere. Occasion- 
ally the ducks bunch in here and there, and 
if a shooter happens to be present at the 
time, he gets good shooting. All gentlemen 
know when to quit, even in such rare 
cases ; but these Poplars did not. They 
will probably continue to hang around the 
flats, as long as they live and to eke out 
a miserable existence by occasionally get- 
ting $5 or $10 from some sportsmen who 
would like to kill a few ducks. Further- 
more this Poplar type of swine will oc- 
casionally get a flight of ducks, murder 
them, and, if possible, sell them. 

This slaughter was committed in the 
spring, too, when the birds were on their 
way to their nesting grounds. 

The only way we can ever hope to put 
these disreputable brutes out of business is 
to stop spring shooting, and to stop the 
sale of game. 

Captain Poplar's number on the game 
hog list is 891 and Jesse D. Poplar's is 
892. — Editor. 



AMONG THE DUCKS. 

Twin lakes are situated 5 miles North 
of Rockwell City, Iowa. They are beauti- 
ful bodies of water separated by a ridge 30 
rods wide. The North lake is y 2 mile wide 
and 3 miles long. The South lake is about 
one square mile in extent. These lakes are 
on a large prairie and are partly surrounded 
by small trees. To the Northwest extends 
a large marsh called Hell's slough. Lakes 
and marshes are surrounded by immense 
grain fields. 

By September 1, when the open season 
begins, teal are abundant and the first day 
or 2 any one with a gun can get ducks ; but 
teal are _ no fools, and soon even expert 
shots fail to bring in large bags. Later 
come spoonbills, widgeons and other small 
ducks. Still later bluebills, with a few can- 
vasbacks and mallards ; but it is during the 
last of October and the first half of No- 
vember that the canvasback and mallard 
hold high carnival on these lakes. 

Some of our local shooters and a few 
visitors had royal sport last fall. About 
.November 1, Frank Owens and Peck Mead, 
2 local sports and expert wing shots, took 



a 2 days' shoot on South lake, killing over 
200 ducks. They are royal good fellows as 
well as good shots, and know the ways of 
the birds. 

Some sportsmen may cry game hog, but 
if they had seen the boys shoot, standing 
in their boats on the lake, the wind blowing 
a gale and the waves rolling, they would 
have been as ready to cheer as we were. 
D. C. Nowels, Rockwell, la. 

If I were you I would not waste time 
apologizing for any man who slaughters 
game. It is the most utterly hopeless task 
you could possibly undertake in this age 
of the world. When you tell about 2 men 
killing over 200 ducks in 2 days, you may 
as well submit their case to the jury of 
public opinion without comment, for no 
amount of argument in their favor could 
conceal their bristles. These men may be 
"sports," as you term them, but they are 
not sportsmen, no matter how rough the 
weather was, or how hard the porkers had 
to root to get their game. 

Owens is game hog number 893 and 
Peck Mead is hog number 894. — Editor. 



HOW THE BUFFALO DIED. 

It was on the sandy waste of Colorado. 
The hot day was nearing its end. The sun, 
which had scorched the arid plain all 
day, cast its rays obliquely on it, tinging all 
objects with a brownish yellow hue. North, 
South and East spread the limitless desert ; 
not a single mound or hillock relieved the 
tired eye. Toward the setting sun, and 
gleaming with ethereal beauty, Pike's Peak 
raised its 14,150 feet of awe-inspiring ma- 
jesty to the heavens. 

It was at the close of such a day that 
Leslie Winton, explorer and naturalist, 
spurred his tired pony toward a stream 
which he had selected as a favorable spot 
for the night's halt. As he approached the 
place he saw something which made him 
quicken his horse's pace. In a few min- 
utes he arrived at his goal, and there, a 
few rods from the stream, stood a noble 
bull buffalo. Winton's first impulse was to 
shoot, but after a second glance he lowered 
his piece and intently observed every move- 
ment of the beast. 

The bull was dying; the emaciated 
flanks, sprawling legs and lolling tongue 
proved it. Yet even in his sore strait he 
bore himself with a natural majesty which 
bespoke the king. The dull, lusterless eyes, 
shaggy neck and defiant poise of the head 
uphold the reputation of savage strength so 
characteristic of the buffalo, even in death. 

In a few moments unmistakable signs of 
the end became apparent. Twice he fell on 
his knees and as often regained his feet. 
The third time, struggle as he would, he 
could not rise. He knelt there, then with 
one mighty bellow, breathing defiance to 



124 



RECREATION. 



all the world, the leader of many a herd, 
the victor of many a fierce encounter, fell 
on his side and died. 

Slowly and thoughtfully Winton removed 
his sombrero in reverence for the brute 
king who had once reigned supreme over 
this wide expanse. Then, with a kind word 
and a pat, he urged his tired pony once 
more onward, while over that barren waste 
settled the shroud of night. 

Carl A. Leasenfeld, New York City. 



GOOD WORK IN THE PHILIPPINES. 

When I was in the Philippines with an 
American rancher, I was out hunting, in 
the mountains of Banquet. We camped 
along the creek, and every day while sit- 
ting around camp, we saw natives passing 
along the trail with bulls loaded with nets, 
each native leading a bunch of dogs. Later 
in the day we heard the parties high in the 
hills, whooping and yelping, and dogs 
barking. We concluded that those natives 
were chasing deer into their nets. One 
night we were talking about game laws in 
the islands prohibiting the use of dogs and 
nets, and such other means of hunting 
deer. Mr. M., my friend, suggested going 
up in the hills the next day before the 
natives should pass and witnessing the 
hunt ; and if we should get a chance, kill- 
ing the dogs and destroying the nets. The 
next morning we were up early and picked 
a place so we could see ioo yards or so 
around us. In about 2 hours the leading 
dogs were a short distance from us. Mr. 
M. said to me, - 

"Take good aim and kill all the. curs you 
can." • 

I was more anxious for the dogs to 
come, than if I had been waiting for the 
largest buck. We opened fire and succeed- 
ed in killing 3 dogs, and crippling 2 more; 
but I thought I should die laughing to see 
the curs stampede. Not another sound was 
heard from either natives or dogs. We 
went to the next hill, and ran right in their 
net but nothing was in it. Perhaps we 
saved a deer or a boar. After cutting the 
nets, we returned to camp, satisfied with 
the day's work. 

John N. Bryan, Bakersfield, Cal. 

Good ! I wish every man who finds a 
dog running a deer, in this or any other 
country, would kill the dog; and some of 
the dog owners deserve killing, too. 

— Editor. 



ENRIGHT'S BEAR. 
C. F. 

Near the top of Merrit mountain, on the 
Idaho-Nevada State line, Mike Enright, 
who weighs 240 pounds and has fully as 
many friends, had driven his 4 little stakes 
and was doing his assessment work. He 



usually rode to and from his claim, as it 
was some distance from his cabin. 

One eventful dav he took his Winchester 
across his saddle and started for his pros- 
pect, intending to do a little hunting on the 
way. Within easy walking distance of his 
claim he dismounted and picketed his horse 
with a goodly length of rope. Standing his 
rifle near, he rambled up the hill until he 
came face to face with a huge bear, evi- 
dently eating berries. Mike didn't ponder 
a second, but started down hill at his best 
gait, grasped his gun, vaulted into the sad- 
dle, and, digging his heels into the horse, 
started for home. He probably would 
have reached it in good season if he had 
not forgotten to pull up his picket pin. As 
it was, he continued his journey some little 
distance after the horse stopped. 

When Mike opened his eyes there was no 
bear in sight, only his horse feeding close 
by, still fast to the rope, and the rifle 50 
feet farther down the hill. He gathered 
himself together and started homeward, 
trying to remember how it all happened. 
Suddenly he saw, peering through the wil- 
lows beside the trail, another bear. To 
prove to himself he was still a hunter he 
opened fire and made things smoke for a 
few seconds. Instead of the growl and 
tearing of brush he expected to hear came 
the awful bray of a burro which another 
prospector had staked in the brush for the 
night. It was badly wounded, but Mike 
nursed it back to health, and it may still be 
seen on the range with the wild horses, 
where it is known to the punchers as En- 
right's bear. 



A TREE BEAR. 

One morning, on going to a bear trap 
where I expected to catch a big grizzly, I 
found the trap and a good sized clog gone. 
It was no trouble to find the trail. Small 
trees had been torn out of the ground, 
dirt thrown about, and Cain raised gener- 
ally. The bear had gone through a small 
opening, and, by marks in the light snow, 
I could see he had swung the clog clear 
around him, with only the end touching the 
ground. 

I had just made up my mind for a long 
tramp trailing him, when I came on the 
trap and clog, with the little toe of his 
left forefoot in the trap. The bear had left 
on a slow walk and, I think, looking back 
over first one shoulder and then the other, 
and gritting his teeth. He was, no doubt, 
in a nasty temper, and would have jumped 
on anything he saw move. 

I took the trap on the horse in front of 
me and started for camp. The grizzly had 
taken the same course, so I was on the 
lookout for him. I had not gone far be- 
fore I saw, in a small opening, 100 yards 
away, my grizzly standing, with only his 






FROM THE GAME FIELDS. 



I2J 



body in sight. Reaching over carefully I 
set the trap on the ground and got off the 
horse. I pulled my rifle from the scabbard, 
took careful aim over the horse's back and 
fired. The bear never moved. I thought 
I would investigate before shooting any 
more. I found I had shot at the trunk of 
a tree, and hit it, too. The tree had been 
bent over while small, and was just the 
right height, size and color for a bear. 

S. N. Leek, Jackson, Wyo. 



ELK IN TWO-OCEAN PASS. 

We had traveled 18 days by rail, wagon 
and pack train and for 8 days had hunted 
unsuccessfully. One of our party had, it 
is true, missed an easy shot at a bull elk, 
but that had been the extent of our luck. 
We had moved camp to Enos lake and, this 
particular morning, I was routed out of my 
comfortable spruce bough bed long before 
dawn, in order that we might be far from 
camp when daylight appeared. 

We set out in a Southerly direction and 
after tramping a mile or so came on fresh 
tracks of a band of elk. We were about 
to follow them when the guide, Jimmie, 
saw, in the direction from whence the 
tracks came, one of those little parks so 
numerous in that country. He led the way 
to it. While we were ascending a slight- 
elevation he whispered, "There he stands, 
head on. Take him where the light and 
dark colors meet." I could see only what 
seemed a dead bush, taller than its green 
neighbors, but was presently able to distin- 
guish the head and shoulders of an elk 
standing 200 yards away. It was my first 
sight of big game and I took a good look 
at it along the barrel of my rifle. When 
satisfied with my observations I touched 
the trigger and became owner of a beauti- 
ful pair of antlers. The following day I 
killed another bull elk and saw others. 

In the Two Ocean Pass country elk are 
exceedingly wild from constant persecution, 
thousands having been slaughtered in recent 
years merely for their teeth. 

A. H. Nelson, Pittsburg, Pa. 



HUNTING DEER IN THE SOUTH. 

Day broke with a clear sky, calling all 
up for, preparation. Guns were taken 
from their cases and hurriedly inspected, 
and every one rushed to the kitchen at the 
call of "Breakfast!" 

Breakfast over, we started out for a 
buck. A mile and a half from camp we 
struck a trail in the thick swamp to the 
right of the road and the hunters scattered 
as the dogs gave tongue. In 10 minutes 
the baying of the pack in the distance told 
us that the game was roused and every 
one was on the alert. Every one covered 
his stand except one, who, being on his 
first visit, did not know where to find a 



stand. After many fruitless endeavors to 
find one, he finally threw himself down, 
in utter disgust, and waited to hear some 
hunter's gun. 

Suddenly looking up he saw a 4 pronged 
buck standing only 30 yards from him. 
Bang ! into the face of the flyin' jib ; but 
he scored a miss, shooting high. Four 
buckshot cut streaks down the astonished 
buck's back, *and he halted directly across 
the road, offering a splendid broadside 
shot at 35 yards. This time the aim was 
better and the game dropped without a 
struggle. 

A blast of the horn brought everybody 
hurriedly to the scene ; the usual congrat- 
ulations were extended. 

J. S. Estill, Savannah, Ga. 



CAME AFTER THE HOUNDS. 

I left here October 18 for Animus river, 
where I joined Jim St. Claire and Bill 
Shute. We went to the Hermosa creek 
country after deer. Brice Patterson, of 
Silverton, got there first, with his hounds, 
and we found no deer, but most abundant 
signs of their recent presence. We also 
found signs of elk, but they, too, had gone. 
Hermosa creek is famous for - f rout, but 
we could find none. Whether or not Brice 
Patterson had chased them out of the 
water with his hounds, I can not say. 
_ In despair we returned to the Animus 
river, and hunted deer, without success. 
They were too highly educated, and the 
ground was dry. I got 2 shots at a big 
timber-line buck; one running, the other 
standing, at about 400 yards. Both went 
high. I made too much allowance for dis- 
tance, and not enough for the great carry- 
ing power of my rifle. Two cow- 
boys roped a large black bear near us, 
strung it out, and killed it by pounding 
its head with a rock. They estimated its 
weight at 450 pounds. 

Two large mountain lions crossed the 
main road within a mile of this city, and 
within 200 yards of the village of San 
Maguel, in the middle of the day. They 
were seen by many, but no one had a gun. 
Eight or 10 deer, and several bear were 
killed near here last fall. Grouse were 
rather scarce. 

C. M. Coleman, Telluride, Colo. 



THANKSGIVING QUAILS. 

Last Thanksgiving day I started out with 
my gun and 3 setters for an afternoon's 
sport. A friend and his little boy went 
along. In this locality we are not blessed 
with an abundance of game, but we wished 
to try our luck; so we harnessed a horse 
to a spring wagon and drove 3 miles to 
Brookville, tied the horse and set out. We 



126 



RECREATION. 



hunted until an hour before sunset with- 
out seeing a feather, although the dogs 
•worked hard. As we were about to turn 
back, I chanced to look around and saw 
the dog standing as stiff as a tree in one 
corner of the field. When the birds rose 
we dropped 3. This, of course, put new 
life into us. The dogs retrieved their birds 
nicely and we started in pursuit of the scat- 
tered covey, which had settled in chestnut 
timber, bagging 5 more before dark. 

At one time my friend was 400 or 500 
yards from me when he flushed and killed 
a quail, firing both barrels. I saw a quail 
coming toward me. When it saw me it 
turned straight away and I fired. I could 
see I had killed it, but although I saw it 
turn over several times, and fall between 
2 trees, the dogs failed to find it. While 
searching for my bird, the boy found it. on 
the side of a large chestnut. In falling it 
struck the point of a projecting stick, which 
passed through the body and out of the 
back, holding it 10 feet above the ground. 
Richard Hendrickson, Jr., 

Sea Cliff, L. I. 



IN SOUTHERN MONTANA. 
In the fall of 1900 I fixed up a camping 
outfit and with my wife went to Big Sheep 
Creek basin, 20 miles distant. On the way 
we caught a nice mess of trout. Arrived in 
the basin, I took my shot gun and a few 
shells and bagged 6 sage chickens. _ The 
next day we merely fished a few minutes 
and bagged 3 more chickens. The third 
day we breakfasted early, and rode to 
Dead Man's lake, taking our bedding, to 
be prepared to remain over night if neces- 
sary. This little lake is one of the best 
for trout fishing in the Rocky mountains. 
'While my wife fished I took my 30-30 
Winchester and went to a good place for 
deer. I was out 3 or 4 hours before I 
saw something I took to be a deer. I 
looked through my telescope and counted 
6. Working my way within 250 yards I 
lay down, took deliberate aim at a buck and 
fired. The rest of them were soon out of 
sight. I dressed my deer, a 3-pronged 
buck, and hung him up. At camp I found 
my wife had caught 9 2-pound trout. 
Then I saddled up the horses and brought 
in the buck. The next morning I shot an- 
other deer at the water's edge. Then we 
packed up and returned to our first camp. 
John Patterson, Dell, Mont. 



GAME NOTES. 
I have been a regular reader of your 
glorious little magazine for several years. 
I take other sportsmen's magazines, but 
Recreation is above them all. The way 
you roast the hogs amuses me. We have 
a few specimens here, but as our game 
laws are strict and well enforced, the swine 



can not greatly injure our game. Prairie 
chickens, grouse, and quails are numerous. 
We also have excellent duck and goose 
shooting. I take much interest in game 
protection. It is the duty of every sports- 
man to do all he can to prevent game from 
being slaughtered. You are doing all you 
can and you have accomplished much. 
Keep the good work going and we will 
stay with you. 

F. J. Brechan, Chamberlain, S. D. 



I hand you a clipping from the Fort 
Wayne (Ind.) Journal. You will see that 
we do a little game protecting here. There 
is such a thing as being too late, but Vol- 
merding was a little too soon. Game is 
scarce with us and needs all the protec- 
tion we can give it. 

H. D. Stokes, Fort Wayne, Ind. 

Here is the clipping: 

Henry Volmerding was out a day or 2 ago with 
his dog and gun, and fired one shot into a covey 
of "quails. As far as he was able to tell he in- 
flicted no damage on any of the birds. Deputy 
Game and Fish Warden R. D. Fleming heard of 
the matter and filed an affidavit in Justice Buller- 
mann's court. Volmerding entered a plea of 
guilty. He was fined $5 and costs, to which must 
be added $20 that goes to the State, and all told, 
he was compelled to pay $34 for his one shot. 



The laws respecting game in force in the North- 
west Territories now apply to the following In- 
dians, in the bands and agencies: 

Yellow Quill and Kinistino, at Touchwood hills. 

Cote, Key and Keeseehouse, at Pelly. 

James Smith and Cumberland, at Duck lake. 

Chippewyan, at Onion lake. 

Alexander, Joseph and Paul, at Edmonton. 

William Twatt, Petequakey, Mistawasis, Ah-tah- 
ka-koop, Kenemotayo and Wah-pa-ton (Sioux), at 
Carlton. 

Saddle Lake, Blue Quill, James Seenum and 
Moose Woods (Sioux), at Saddle lake. — Calgary, 
Alta., Herald. 



The 29th of December a carrier pigeon 
came to me and has remained ever since. 
On each leg is a silver band, with inscrip- 
tion on one A. T. B., 22, 1899, and on the 
other 48, 1901. Can you give me any in- 
formation so I can find the right owner? 
Eli F. Cushman, Bethel, Me. 



Lynxes and foxes are being brought in 
every ^ day. G. C. Harrington caught a 
lynx, in his trap, measuring 3 feet 11 inch- 
es from tip of nose to tip of tail. 

H. R. Grey, Danby, Vt. 

There are a few grouse in the woods 
South of this place. Game laws are not 
enforced at all. 

G. E. Spendley, Syracuse, N. Y. 



Boast not, and the world knows not who 
you are ; boast, and it despises you for 
what you are, 



FISH AND FISHING. 



ALMANAC FOR SALT WATER FISHERMEN. 

The following will be found accurate and val- 
uable for the vicinity of New York City: 

Kingfish — Barb, Sea-Mink, Whiting. June to 
September. Haunts: The surf and deep channels 
of strong tide streams. Baits: Blood worms, 
shedder crabs and beach crustaceans. Time and 
tide: Flood, early morning. 

Plaice — Fluke, Turbot, Flounder. May 15 to 
November 30. Haunts: The surf, mouth of tidal 
streams. Baits: Shedder crabs, killi-fish, sand 
laut. Time and tide: Ebb, daytime exclusively. 

Spanish mackerel — Haunts: The open sea, July 
to September. Baits: Menhaden, trolling — metal 
and cedar squids. 

Striped Bass — Rock Fish, Green Head. April to 
November. Haunts: The surf, bays, estuaries and 
tidal streams. Baits: Blood worms, shedder crabs, 
Calico crabs, small eels, menhaden. Time and 
tide. Night, half flood to flood, to half ebb. 

The Drums, Red and Black. June to Novem- 
ber. Haunts: The surf and mouths of large bays. 
Bait: Skinner crab. Time and tide: Day, flood. 

Blackfish — Tautog, April to November. Haunts: 
Surf, vicinity of piling and old wrecks in bays. 
Baits: Sand worm, blood worm, shedder crabs, 
clams. Time and tide: Daytime , flood. 

Lafayette — Spot, Goody, Cape May Goody. 
August to October. Haunts: Channels of tidal 
streams. Baits: Shedder crabs, sand worms, clams. 
Time and Tide : Day and night flood. 

Croker — July to October. Haunts: Deep chan- 
nels of bays. Baits: Shedder crabs, mussels. 
Time and tide: Day, flood. 

Snapper — Young of Blue Fish. _ August to No- 
vember. Haunts: Rivers and all tide ways. Baits: 
Spearing and menhaden; trolling pearl squid. 
Time and tide: Day, all tides. 

Sheepshead— June to October Haunts: Surf 
and bays, vicinity of old wrecks. Baits: Clams, 
mussels, shedder crabs. Time and tide: Day, 
flood only. 

New England Whiting — Winter Weak-fish, 
Frost-fish. November to May. Haunts: The 
surf. Baits: Sand laut, spearing. Time and tide: 
Night, flood. 

Hake — Ling. October to June. Haunts: Open 
sea surf, large bays. Baits: Clams, mussels, fish. 
Time and tide: Day and night, flood. 

Weak-fish — Squeteague, Squit. June to October. 
Haunts: t Surf, all tideways. Baits: Shedder 
crabs, surf mullet, menhaden, ledge mussels, sand 
laut, shrimp. Time and tide: Day and night, 
flood preferred. 

Blue Fish — Horse Hackerel. June to November 
ist ; Haunts: Surf, open sea and large bays. 
Baits: Menhaden, surf mullet and trolling squid. 
Time and tide: Daytime; not affected by tides. 



MISSOURI NEEDS AROUSING. 

I have been reading Recreation 2 years 
and find you are after the game and fish 
hogs just right. 

Jasper county, Missouri, is one of the 
best places on earth for fish, and fish 
hogs. Center creek, Spring river and Dry 
Fork are all good for bass, crappies, and 
other fishes, but there are so many fish 
hogs that all kinds of fishes are getting 
scarce; and the laws to protect them are 
not enforced. Bass are fished for with 
bait, and when they will not bite, in the 
winter, the hogs go after them with a gig. 
If the water is muddy, these swine set 
traps. In April when bass go on the nest, 



they are shot or seined, and I do not see 
how any of them are left. There is a law 
to protect bass, but half the fine goes to 
the constable, and few of the fellows who 
do the shooting and seining have money to 
pay their fines ; so Mr. Constable does not 
pay any attention to them. Last spring 
when the constable was told about some 
men who were seining bass under the dam, 
and one informant offered to go with him, 
the constable would not do it because there 
was no money for the officer in making an 
arrest. These fish hogs shoot 5 or 6 bass 
when they are nesting, carry them right 
through the town, and brag about it, and 
nobody says a word. It is the same with 
all other kinds of fishes. I see lots of bass 
under 6 inches sold in the restaurants here. 

There are some white fellows here, and 
some niggers, that do nothing but fish. 
They sell everything they catch. There is 
a crowd at McDaniel's mill now and they 
will not leave there until the bass quit 
biting. There is another crowd at Ous- 
tott's lake. They use a trammel net. 

There is also a crowd that has been fish- 
ing at Galesburg all winter, and they bring 
fish to market every week. They say the 
bass are biting well, but it has been cold 
for bass to bite, part of the time, and you 
can guess how these men got them. 

Two of the worst enemies of fishes are 
poison and dynamite. A case of poisoning 
happened at Bower's mill. They must have 
killed a ton of fishes, for the bodies got to 
smelling so bad that the people had to haul 
them away and bury them. 

About a year and a half ago, at Mc- 
Daniel's mill, I saw a lot of buzzards and 
smelled a sickening smell; and for about a 
mile the river was full of dead fishes and 
turtles. The buzzards were eating them. 
Somebody had set off dynamite and killed 
everything. 

Last spring someone put dynamite or 
poison into the mill race right here in town 
and killed lots of fishes, but nothing was 
said about it. 

The dams are all high and there is no 
place for the fishes to get over, except at 
the one here, which is low and sloping. The 
one at the old McDaniel mill has a place 
fixed for fishes to get over, but it might as 
well be up the side of the court house for 
all the good it does the fishes. The water 
does not run over it more than once a 
year. I understand that there is no fish- 
way at Baxter Springs, Waco, Gales- 
burg, or at Forest mills, and that all the 
dams are high. I wish some of the fel- 
lows here would get up a club to protect 
the fishes ; something like the gun club that 



127 



128 



RECREATION. 



looks after the quails: If something is 
not done soon, we shall have no fishes l.eft. 
Gabe Thompson, Carthage, Mo. 



A SLIP ON THE FLY. 

I greatly enjoy going through piles of 
old magazines and papers that lie covered 
with dust in an old garret. In one of my 
recent searches I found a slip that may be 
of use to the casters of the fly. It was 
laid away carefully in the leaves of a mag- 
azine with no signature to tell who the au- 
thor was. It was as follows : 

"I have just seen an artificial fly made 
and used by the Indians of Kings river, in 
California, for fishing. It was given to one 
of our State fish commissioners by a gen- 
tleman who has pushed his travels through 
that unknown part of the country. There 
has been little if any communication be- 
tween white people and these Indians, so 
the idea of taking fish with an artificial fly 
clearly originated with themselves. From 
what can be learned these Indians have 
used flies for many generations past; how 
many it would be difficult, if not impos- 
sible, to establish, but long enough in all 
probability to give them priority of man- 
ufacture over any of English or other 
civilized make. 

"We are not indebted to the Indian for 
the artificial fly, for we discovered the util- 
ity of it without his aid ; but for all that, 
it may now be safe to assume that he in- 
vented it and used it long before we did, 
either in England or here. To the Indian, 
then, should the credit of the invention of 
fly fishing be given, and to this tribe on 
Kings river. No other tribe on this con- 
tinent, as far as I know, appears to have 
used flies for taking fish. The hook of the 
fly I have seen — the first and perhaps the 
only one ever possessed by a white man — ■ 
is made out of a piece of iron wife. It has 
no barb, but the portion of the shank of the 
hook not covered by the fly, and down to 
the crook, is wound with a fibrous sub- 
stance resembling flax, to prevent, in some 
degree, the fish from shipping or getting 
off when once hooked. Before the Indians 
got iron or iron wire to make the hook 
they made it from the tibia or shank bone 
of the deer, as being the hardest and closest 
grain of the bone. The fly, although a 
little roughly put together, is beautifully 
made, closely representing when cast on 
the water that which it is intended it 
should, the caterpillar. It is made from 
the hairs taken from the deer's hock, which 
possesses a scent. It is also sometimes 
made from the long hairs of the wart on 
the deer's leg, from which there is also a 
scent. It is generally supposed that the 
scent of the deer comes from between the 
hoof, but old deer hunters will tell you 
that it also comes from the wart. The 



Indians say the fish like the smell, and 
water will not destroy or dissipate it. Here 
is an important fact for anglers and arti- 
ficial fly makers. In tying, the hairs lie up 
the shaft of the hook, so that when the fly 
is thrown and drawn across up and down 
the stream the action of the water causes 
the hairs, of a reddish tint, to spread out. 
When the strain on the line slackens the 
hairs spring back, and the movement so 
produced, of opening and closing the hairs, 
gives to the fly the lifelike action and the 
appearance of a caterpillar. 

"These Indians say that mountain trout 
will take this fly when they will not look 
at any other bait. The line is made from 
a fine fibrous plant which grows there, re- 
sembling what is called the milk plant, of 
which there are 3 known varieties on this 
continent. The line is as strong as the 
best silk one cast, with the advantage of 
being considerably lighter. 

"The important fact is that the Indians 
of the West coast caught fish with an arti- 
ficial fly probably long before such were 
known and used in England; also that 
those of the Indians are constructed on 
more scientific principles than those of Eu- 
ropean or other manufacture." 

Edwin C. Hobson, Nashua, N. H. 




TWO NEW REELS. 
724,208.— Fishing Reel. Edward D. Rock- 
well, Bristol, Conn., assignor to Liberty 
Bell Company, Bristol, Conn., a corpo- 
' ration of Connecticut. Filed July 29, 
1902. Serial No. 117,435. (No model.) 
Claim. — 1. The 
combination, with 
a fishing reel hav- 
ing a chambered 
spindle, of a gear 
loosely mounted on 
said spindle and 
provided with a 
recess having a 
wall eccentric to 
the axis thereof, 
said recess termi- 
nating in a shoulder; a device mounted in 
the spindle, and adapted automatically to 
engage the shoulder of the gear-recess when 
the spindle is rotated in one direction, and 
to be disengaged from said shoulder when 
the spindle is rotated in an opposite direc- 
tion ; and means for applying resistance to 
said gear. 

2. A spindle having a bore at one of its 
ends; a roller mounted in said bore; a de- 
vice sleeved on the bored end of the spin- 
dle and having a recess of greater ampli- 
tude than the spindle, said recess having a 
shoulder with which the roller is adapted to 
engage when the spindle is rotated by the 
running out of the line ; and click and brake 
elements cooperating with said device, etc. 



FISH AND FISHING. 



129 



726,655. — Fishing Reel., John Dreiser, New 
York. Filed December 3, 1902. No. 
133.691. 



in October and November, but it failed us 
this year. 

W. F. Dunn, Washington, D. C. 




Claim. — 1. The combination, with a con- 
cave plate, of a fishing reel provided with a 
spindle at right angles to the plate, of a 
disk attached to said concave plate and 
spindle, radial arms on said disk extending 
to the outer circumference of the reel, 
and pivoted and spring-actuated fingers at 
the outer ends of said radial arms and 
adapted to be moved transversely across 
the reel. 



WITHIN SIGHT OF THE CAPITOL. 
I enclose clipping which explains itself. 
It is generally believed among anglers 
hereabout that these acts of piracy went on 
all winter. 

The fines for illegal fishing, amounting to 
$138.13, which were assessed against William Balt- 
zell, John Thomas, John W. Brown and William 
Lacey, were paid by the men involved, who 
pleaded guilty. By the terms of the law one -half 
of this sum goes to the policemen who made 
the arrest. The boat and net recovered by. the 
officers have been ordered turned over to the fish 
firm of Neitzey & Ballenger, who were shown to 
be the real owners. The firm promised that the 
apparatus should not again be used in District 
waters. — Washington, D. C, Post. 

Not only the Eastern branch, but Oxon 
run, a tributary of the Potomac, within the 
jurisdiction of the District of Columbia, is 
nightly seined ; and it is the general 
opinion that the tidal basin is also hauled 
every night when there is no ice to pre- 
vent. 

It would seem that this law breaking 
can be stopped, but no vigorous steps to 
that end have yet been taken. Our closed 
season brings some relief, as it lasts 
through April and May, during which 
time it is punishable by a heavy fine to 
have in possession in this District a bass 
of any character. 

Last winter was an unusually open sea- 
son. One day in the middle of February 
I counted 21 anglers on the North seawall 
of the tidal basin. They were catching big 
mouth bass. The fish were sluggish, but 
they took the bait. 

. Bass fishing about here last fall prac- 
tically amounted to nothing, owing, no 
doubt, to the continued mild weather and 
the consequent high temperature of the 
water. We usually have some good sport 



BASS IN MAINE. 

Charlie and I left Boston the 31st of 
June and arrived in North Wayne, Maine, 
about 12 o'clock. That town is a 7 mile 
drive from Winthrop, the nearest station 
on the Bangor and Aroostook railroaa. 
We got a boat and went to a lake about 2 
miles from .the Androscoggin river. At 
the lake we caught a can of live frogs and 
took up our position just outside a little 
neck of land through which ran a swift 
current. Within an hour we caught 6 
bass, not one weighing less than 2 pounds. 
I caught one that weighed S Z A pounds. 
Then we ran into a school of brindle 
perch. I dislike having them around me 
when I am fishing for bass. I had just 
caught one and had him to the top of 
the water when up came a pickerel at 
least 18 inches long. To tell the truth it 
scared me to see that monster come up 
and grab that perch. I put my hand in the 
water to pull him in but he flipped up his 
tail, broke the line and went. 

We fished about 15 minutes longer 
and then pulled up our lines and rowed 
home, well satisfied with the day's luck. 
Nevill B. Jennings, Waterbury, Conn. 



WHERE TO FIND THE TUNA. 
Can you give me the address of any tuna 
or tarpon clubs in the Eastern States or 
Canada ; or any clubs that would be in- 
terested in that sort of fishing. We have 
in Cape Breton waters a fish which appears 
to be identical with the leaping tuna of 
Santa Catalina island. It will take bait 
readily and is one of the most active and 
powerful fishes of its size. These fish 
have never been taken on the rod. They 
have frequently been hooked with hand 
lines, and if the line does not break, the 
angler is glad to cut it to avoid having 
his boat towed under. These fish look ex- 
actly like mackerel but have no stripes on 
the back and weigh 150 pounds and up- 
ward. Some taken with harpoons are said 
to have weighed over 500 pounds. Many 
stories are told of these fish, and with all 
due allowance these monsters afford all 
the sport it is possible to obtain in a con- 
test of skill against strength. As they re- 
main with us during July, August and 
September, I propose to try for them this 
year. 

A. W. Woodill, Sydney, C. B. 



NIBBLES. 

Please tell me the name of the fish that 

is shaped like the perch, is about 6 inches 

long, has brazen and silver colored scales, 

a large mouth, and large eyes, with black 



ijo 



RECREATION. 



iris surrounded by a deep pink, or light 
red. 

Some persons here call them sunfish but 
I think they are not. They may grow 
larger but I have seen none longer than 6 
inches. 

Frank Lane, Mi. Gilead, Ohio. 

ANSWER. 

The fish you describe is apparently the 
rock bass, or goggle-eye. It is sometimes 
called the redeye. Its scientific name is 
Ambloplites rupestris. It belongs in the 
same family with the black basses and the 
sunfishes. Its habitat extends from Ver- 
mont Westward to Manitoba and South- 
ward to Louisiana and Texas. 

The rock bass reaches a length of a foot 
and a weight of i^ pounds or less. It is 
a good panfish, takes the hook readily, but 
is not a great fighter. 

B. W. E. 



As a lover of fair play and a man who 
does not want all the fish in the stream at' 
one sitting, I denounce the trammel, or 
pocket net, as the lowest and dirtiest means 
of taking fish that is employed to-day. Take 
the bass for example. All one must do 
to be reasonably sure of him is to circle 
his lair with the net, then get inside and 
force him either to jump or be caught. 
Seven times out of 10 he will try to go 
through before jumping, and is sure to be- 
come entangled in the net so fast there is 
no hope. The more he tries the tighter he* 
is fast. If, however, the hog should fail 
he will stretch the accursed net across the 
stream and come and unload next morn- 
ing; for there is not one chance in i ; ooo 
of the fish escaping and he is sure of them 
from up or down. It is impossible for 
them to pass. As long as these nets are 
manufactured they will be used. By using 
the net after dark there is little fear of 
being prosecuted. 

C. B. H., Markleville, Ind. 



I have been a reader of your magazine 
several years and though I have read 
many sportsmen's journals I find none I 
like so well as Recreation. 

I have fished a great deal. Have never 
given the fish a chance at all; just yanked 
him out of the water and put him in a bas- 
ket. I never was a hog, for I stopped at a 
reasonable number. This summer I want 
to fight him fairly, so I should like to have 
you answer a few questions. 

Our river is 300 to 500 yards wide and 
20 to 30 feet deep and contains 2 kinds of 
fishes that I can not catch, black bass and 
carp. Please tell me where I will find 
them, what kinds of bait are best and what 
part of the tide. Is the carp a good fighter 
and table fish? I never learned to fish 



with a fly as I always thought the water 
was too deep. Is that idea incorrect? 

A. R. Prettyman, Galena, Md. 

Will Recreation readers please answer? 
— Editor. 

The Huron river is noted for its good 
fishing places. Recently many large fishes 
have been caught. The latest story origin- 
ated with George Ackerman who, by the 
way, is not a fish hog. He was recently 
fishing down the river, with poor luck, but 
a young man named Clom caught a carp 
that weighed 25 pounds and a catfish that 
weighed 6 pounds, so George claims. As 
George never juggles the truth, his friends 
took pains to weigh the 2 monster fishes. 
The catfish weighed nearly 2 pounds and 
the carp nearly 6. Carp, Milan, Ohio. 



It has been the custom for a party of us 
to drive to Tasawasa lake, about 18 miles 
East of Troy. We find there good fishing, 
an abundance of pond lilies, an excellent 
camping place and accommodations at a 
reasonable rate. 

A. P. Hall, Troy, N. Y. 



Will some angler please instruct me how 
to cast flies and small minnows? Perhaps 
W. S. H., Wadena, Iowa. Also what kind 
of tackle to use. 

J. P. Jaeger, Independence, la. 



OUR NEIGHBOR'S CATCH. 
S. C LONG. 

There was a man in our town, 

And he was wondrous wise ; 
He hooked a fish one day last June, 

'Twas of enormous size. 

And when he saw what he had done, 
He straightway raised a shout ; 

That he, with utmost skill, had hooked 
A 22 pound trout ! 

The line waxed taut, the rod was bowed, 
The man's teeth tight were set ; 

As into his boots the water flowed, 
Cried he, "I'll land ye yet !" 

And when the people came to see 

This fierce and royal battle, 
They held their sides and laughed with 
glee, 

For 'twas a snapping turtle. 



My eagerness to get Recreation seems to 
amuse my friends and the newsdealer as 
well, but I can't help that; I like to read 
it. I like the way you express your opinion 
of any and all game hogs, irrespective of 
station. I think you are doing a noble work, 
and want to see you continue to do it in 
your independent way. 

Dr. R. E. Franklin, Richmond, Va. 



GUNS AND AMMUNITION. 

Anybody can shoot all day, but a gentleman will quit when he gets enough. 



SUGGESTIONS TO GUN MAKERS. 

I am 52 years old. Since early childhood 
I have used a gun, both East and West 
of the Mississippi, and have eagerly 
watched the evolution in fire arms. While 
I sanction improvement, I do not approve 
all the modern complexity in the manu- 
facture of fire arms and ammunition, es- 
pecially the latter. I see a tendency among 
gun makers to find "a little nest with a 
big egg in it" ; in fact, they want to pro- 
duce a gun that will kill anything from 
an elephant down to a flea, make a thrash- 
ing machine, a bobsled, a bootjack, or raise 
a patch of turnips. There is too much sci- 
entific complication in the gun business, 
amounting largely to dangerous and ex- 
pensive humbuggery. For shooting, gener- 
ally, either in war or in the field, there is 
no need of hard metal jackets and soft 
points, explosive bullets, etc. The need- 
ful points of a practical gun for general 
purposes are that it shall be plain, strong, 
simple, convenient, durable, rapid and ef- 
fective ; to which may be added, graceful. 

The ammunition for such a gun should 
be. of the class called "fixed" ; that is, 
ready made, as are nearly all modern rifle" 
cartridges ; and it should be of sufficient 
size and weight to be effective. This am- 
munition should be commonplace, that is, 
found in cities, hamlets, country stores, 
etc., all over the land, besides being cheap. 
The more the kinds of cartridges used in 
a gun, the more practical is the weapon ; 
hence the popularity of the Winchester re- 
peater, model 1873, using its own and 3 
other rifle cartridges ; also, as in single 
shooter for short range, 6 pistol cart- 
ridges ; amounting in all to 10 cartridges. 
With such a gun, ammunition can be had 
anywhere. If there were in the market a 
fine shot revolver, of 28 ounces, and 5 inch 
barrel, double action, with the central ex- 
tractor, using a 44-40-200 cartridge, how 
much more popular this gun would be. 
At present all the revolvers using this 
cartridge are 6-shooters, weighing 2^ to 
2^4 pounds, and are too big and heavy for 
general use. Yet, as this shot is a little 
too light I suggest a better gun : A repeat- 
t er of .41 caliber, with 26 inch barrel, shoot- 
ing a 41-50-250 center fire straight shell 
cartridge. The gun should weigh 7 pounds, 
and by using grey powder, which is smoke- 
less and without residue, the cartridges 
sTiould be free from grease or other lubri- 
cator. Easy cartridges are nasty in a 
pocket or belt. That the bullet should go 
straight when fired from a gun, the front 
half of the bullet should be the heaviest. 



To counterbalance the lead shaved off in 
tapering the front end of the bullet, a 
little more lead should be reamed out of 
the center of the rear end of the bullet. 
This cavity should be filled by inserting a 
copper nip, in shape like a gun cap, and 
the end of the bullet left smooth. This is 
my own device to supersede the soft pine 
plug used in the old time Mexican minie 
bullets. This bullet should be smooth on 
the outside, for grooves in the surface ren- 
der the flight of a bullet noisy besides de- 
tracting from the force and speed of the 
bullet. 

The 41 caliber bullet would be preferable 
to a smaller one, for it would impart a 
greater shock, draw more blood and break 
more bone, thus being more efficient for big 
game, as well as for military purposes. 
Such a gun would, as a single shooter, use 
any center fire pistol cartridge of this cali- 
ber in the market, and thus do good work 
at short range. It would also be of use for 
farmers on butchering day. Such a gun's 
own cartridge, the 41-50-250, might be kept 
in reserve for using the gun as a repeater 
at greater range ; and for general purposes, 
this would be the most efficient and practi- 
cal repeater on earth. 

For this new gun I suggest an oblong 
frustum front sight, as it is plain, simple, 
long and strong; and being thin it will ad- 
mit a coarse sight when shooting beyond 
the graduation of the gun, thus making 
the gun carry up somewhat farther. In 
form this sight is a half circle minus % 
its height cut off at its summit, and it 
tapers at both ends, hence it can not catch 
into the clothing, or stick the horse, as do 
all the pointed kinds. The sight should 
be made of something hard and tough, and 
of a dull finish so it would not glitter in 
the sunlight and thus obstruct the vision 
of the shooter. Perhaps a dull, dark gray 
finish can be put on steel, or the sight 
might be made of a dark gray mineral 
cement, or of horn. As a rear sight, I 
recommend a short leaf sight, instead of the 
step sight used on the 44 caliber rifles, with 
9 frets, each fret representing 50 yards. 

I prefer the Colt action, for it can be 
used as a double actor, and thus such a 
rifle could be fired as rapidly as a double 
action revolver. Furthermore, the sliding 
action on the forestock enables the shooter 
to keep a continual hold of his gun, hence 
he does not jerk the gun stock down from 
his shoulder as he would if in a hurry 
•while using a gun of lever action. For 
those using the lever action, I suggest the 
finger lever of the Winchester model 1873 



131 



t$2 



RECREATION. 



rifle, omittting the thumb screw which 
secures the finger lever, for this lever is 
handsomer than the round end kind, be- 
sides not offering- a cavity between the rear 
end of the finger lever and the rifle stock 
to catch the sleeve or a twig; but the 
system of the Winchester model 1892 rifle 
is preferable on account of having a shorter 
stock of finger lever. 

The tendency is too much to small guns 
using little bullets; a lazy man's outfit. 
Look at the eccentric drop of caliber by 
the Government Bureau, the 45 pistol shot, 
30 grains powder and 255 grains lead, 
down to the 38-19-150. The 22, short at 
that, will be adopted next for the native 
musketeer. We do not need a gun that 
will bore a hole the size of a darning 
needle through a haystack 5 or 6 miles 
away, as the smokeless 30-30's will do. On 
the other hand, when a bear or a man is 
struck at short range, midrange, or long 
range, with a 45-100-500 from a Sharp's 
special, he will stay there. Anyone pre- 
ferring a little, slender bullet in a bottle 
neck shell is a 30-30 crank. He would be 
satisfied in shooting an elk 9 times, only 
75 yards away. I could have done it with 
one shot from a 30 caliber pistol. The 
pistol would have cost $1.50; the 30-30 
rifle $25. Over in Ceylon a she-buffalo 
had the hair on her head powder-burned; 
and after she was shot several times with 
a 30-30 she got away. Nearly all the tre- 
mendous ( ?) work done by 30-30's has 
occurred within easy pistol range, say 30 
to 60 yards. I have not yet contracted the 
30-30 disease, hence I shall not go to war 
with a popgun. The way poor, wild ani- 
mals have been maimed by little patent 
bullets shows a lack of both skill and com- 
passion on the part of the hunter. 

Here is a story told by a Montana man: 
"We had one of their modern, small bore, 
high power rifles in our country, and it 
was a terror. When it went off we heard 
a sound as of an earthquake. The jacketed 
part of the bullet went through a tree 5 
feet thick, sailed down the river 7 or 8 
miles, and struck a sawmill, tearing it en- 
tirely down and rolling all the logs into 
the river. One limb of the injured tree 
fell on a bear, killing it instantly, and 
splashing a wagon load of fish out of the 
water. Four elk were so badly fright- 
ened they plunged into the river, and were 
drowned. One deer ran against the splin- 
tered tree and was killed. The soft part 
of the bullet spread out and scraped up all 
the potatoes an old woman had in her gar- 
den, and then the mushrooming began. 
One piece of this soft point went over the 
hill and killed 82 wild geese, and crip- 
pled 11 more; another piece went out into 
the valley, killing 125 ducks, and maiming - 
many more, besides scaring one old duck 



until she laid a basketful of eggs; anothef 
piece went somewhere else, I don't know 
where, but I guess it is going yet." 
We all liked the yarn very much. 

John C. Votaw, Marion, Ind. 




CARTRIDGE CARRIERS. 
722,124. — Carrier for Small Arms Fixed 
Ammunition. Anson Mills, Washing- 
ton, D. C. Filed August 12, 1902. 
Serial No. 119,415. (No model.) 

Claim. — 1. 
As a new art- 
icle of manu- 
facture an am- 
munition car- 
rier consisting 
of a p 1 i a b 1 e 
band and a 
group of cart- 
ridge receiv- 
ing pockets on 
each of the 2 
faces thereof, 
the pockets of the one group being opposite 
the intervals between the pockets of the 
other group. 

2. An ammunition carrier consisting of 
a 3 ply woven fabric, having 2 groups of 
pockets integral therewith, located on op- 
posite faces of the intermediate ply and 
opening at opposite edges of the fabric. 

3- An ammunition carrier consisting of 
a 3 ply woven fabric having 2 groups of 
pockets integral therewith located on op- 
posite faces of the intermediate ply and 
opening at opposite edges of the fabric, 
the intermediate ply at each edge being ex- 
tended beyond the other 2 plies to form a 
covering flap. 

722,123.— Carrier for Small Arms Fixed 
Ammunition. Anson Mills, Washing- 
ton, D. C. Filed July 25, 1902. Serial 
No. 117,037. (No model.) 




Clai 



1m. 



-An ammunition carrier com- 
posed of a band of pliable material provided 
with groups of cartridge receiving pockets 
each of which is closed at one end and 



GUNS AND AMMUNITION. 



133 



open at the other, the mouths of the pocket 
of one group being at the edge of the band 
opposite that at which the mouths of the 
other group are located. 

724,190. — Cartridge Carrier. Emil Krough, 
Cornelius Hogan and John E. Hogan, 
Chicago, 111. Filed April 8, 1901. Se- 
rial No. 54,888. (No model.) 



^ : -u^-..^--X-:.. Tt ^.. s ..j 



Claim. — 1. The combination with a car- 
tridge receptacle adapted to receive a plu- 
rality of cartridges end to end, of means 
for normally engaging the end cartridge, 
means adapted to engage a succeeding car- 
tridge and means for actuating said en- 
gaging means simultaneously in different di- 
rections to cause the release of the cartridge 
or cartridges between the said engaging 
means, and the detention of all the remain- 
ing cartridges. 

2. An interchangeable nozzle therefor, a 
detaining device carried on said nozzle, and 
means for actuating the detaining device 
to release the end cartridge, etc. 



WINCHESTER VS. IDEAL. 

The Ideal reloading tools and implements 
are generally considered perfection, but I 
must take exception to the No. 3 special. 
That tool, in my opinion, does not com- 
pare with the Winchester, model '94, tool 
for general utility, ease and speed of opera- 
tion. 

With the Ideal, the expelling pin and the 
shell are inserted in the chamber, a slow 
operation ; with the Winchester, 2 or 3 
primers may be expelled in the same time 
by holding several shells in the left hand, 
passing the expelling pin from one to an- 
other, striking it each time with a mallet. 
Again, the insertion of the new primer is 
much more easily and quickly effected with 
the Winchester tool. 

Next comes the opening of the mouth of 
shell. The Winchester tool is provided 
with a projection for that purpose, which 
enables the operator to do the work easily 
and with little or no injury to the shell. 
The projector on the Ideal tool for that 
purpose is an unmitigated nuisance. It 
will not open the shell at all, merely grind- 
ing away the point of it. It could easily be 
made different, and I advise all users of 
Ideal tools to take their die to a ma- 
chinist and have it turned down to a proper 
taper. It could be done without injury to 
the chamber. 

In seating the bullet the Winchester tool 
has decided advantages over the Ideal. To 
get best results in shooting, the powder 
should be carefully settled in the shell 
without ramming, and then should not be 



disturbed in seating the bullet. To accom- 
plish this with the Ideal it is necessary to 
work the tool upside down ; and to get the 
shell in place is an awkward and clumsy 
operation. With the Winchester, the bullet 
is placed in the mouth of shell, standing 
upright on the table. The die is then 
placed over it and pressed down until it 
holds the shell firmly, when the die is 
screwed in the frame without changing the 
position of shell. The shell is resized and 
the bullet seated with the one operation, 
perfectly, and more quickly than with the 
Ideal. 

Sharp point bullets can also be seated 
with the regular chamber in the Winchester 
tool in the following manner : Make a 
block of hard maple conforming to the 
shape of the point of chamber, and after 
hollowing it out to receive the sharp point 
of the bullet insert it in the point of the 
chamber. After seating one or 2 bullets, 
you can shape it to the right thickness to 
seat the bullet just where you want it 
crimped. Then it is advisable to stick it in 
place with a little mucilage. I recently got 
a 32-40 Winchester repeating rifle as a pre- 
mium from Recreation, and as I wanted 
to use the No. 31,949 Ideal 152 grain sharp 
point bullet, I contrived this way of seating 
the bullet with the Winchester tool. It 
works to perfection. The Winchester 
Company could easily make these blocks 
of metal to go with the tool at trifling ex- 
pense, thus adapting it for both the regu- 
lar and sharp point bullets. 

I might say for the benefit of J. A. Elliot 
and others wanting information as to the 
best all around rifle that such a weapon 
can, in the nature of things, never be made. 
The nearest approach to it is, in my opin- 
ion, the 32-40 Winchester repeater. It is 
the standard for accuracy, is easy to clean 
and keep in order, and can be made effec- 
tive on big game by using express bullets. 
G. B. Crandall, Cherry Valley, Ont. 



SOMETHING ABOUT RIFLES. 
I have stated before this that in my opin- 
ion the lever, action of the Winchester and 
Savage rifles is far more satisfactory to the 
sportsman than any bolt action, because 
he does not have to change the grip when 
using a finger lever, which certainly counts 
for much. Furthermore, the exorbitant 
prices quoted for the above guns in this 
country make them undesirable for sports- 
men. One can buy a well finished Mann- 
licher, with checked pistol grip, octagon 
barrel, matted rib, and magazine for a clip 
of cartridges in the buttstock, for $16 or 
$17 in any gun store in Germany, while 
$40 is asked for the cheaper round barrel 
rifle here. These German rifles can not be 
excelled for light weight, material, work- 
manship and accuracy. Such rifles cost 
about $30 in Germany. Which of the 2 



134 



RECREATION. 



rifles is preferable? They are nearly 
alike. Both actions are modifications of 
the old 1871 model Mauser army rifle, 
which is still a standard action on the 
other side for target and hunting rifles. 
The Mauser has no box magazine, which 
is an advantage, as one does not have to 
load by means of the clip, as in the Mann- 
licher or the 1888 model ; but while the 
latest model Mauser may have advantages 
over the 1888 model Mannlicher, from a 
military standpoint, give me the model '88 
for a sporting rifle. The cartridge is pow- 
erful and big enough for anything. While 
neither the 2-3 nor the 4-5 jacketed bullet 
is so accurate as the full mantled, both are 
satisfactory for hunting purposes, the 4-5 
mantled especially. It is evident, however, 
that the bullet which has 4-5 of its length 
covered by a metal jacket will give better 
penetration than a 2-3 mantled, while it ex- 
pands amply with the full load of powder. 
I have not dwelt on the far killing 
power of my favorite rifle. It is true 
the weapon leaves nothing to be de- 
sired in that respect, but no hunting 
rifle should, as a rule be used at 
long range. Some might now say they 
could use a 44-40 just as effectively as high 
power ammunition. Perhaps so, but it is 
evident that with the modern gun one is 
more certain of his game and will probab- 
ly save it hours of suffering and save his 
legs as well, by speedily despatching his 
game. In olden times the hunter took de- 
light in the work of his well trained blood- 
hound on the trail of the deer he had pur- 
posely wounded the night before, but such 
work at the expense of the poor suffering 
brute is unworthy of the 20th century. 
If we must take life, let us_ do so in the 
safest and quickest way, without causing 
any unnecessary suffering. 

It appears reasonable to me to use only 
standard ammunition in a high power rifle 
and by having different styles of soft 
points, adapt the rifle to different kinds of 
work. One will thus be enabled to regu- 
late the penetration and killing power or 
smashing effect, while the accuracy re- 
mains uninfluenced and the sights need 
not be changed. 

F. J. G., New Brookland, S. C. 



SPARROW GUNS. 

I noticed an article in Recreation de- 
scribing a miniature sparrow gun, made 
from a 22 Winchester rifle, smooth bored 
and chambered for 22 center fire shells. 
The writer of the article lauds the weapon 
highly. I tried industriously to rid our 
premises of sparrows, not long ago, and 
they seemed to thrive on the 22 caliber shot 
gun treatment. It was not until I invoked 
the aid of a 22 rifle and the new Winchester 
greaseless 22 short that the birds left the 



yard for good. My little shot gun was a 22 
smooth bored Flobert, chambered for the 
22 long shot cartridge. The shot charge 
in this shell varies from 75 to over 100 No. 
12 shot. Its penetration is good, and the 
noise is slight,. I found, after much shoot- 
ing and many unexplainable misses, that at 
25 to 30 feet it would scatter over an area 
of about 6 inches, making a pattern that 
would kill a sparrow very dead. But, un- 
less the gun was kept clean by swabbing 
after each shot, it would ball the shot so 
badly that the bird would be either cleanly 
missed or cut into ribbons. I made several 
targets at 20 feet to 20 yards where the 
shot all entered the paper in a solid mass, 
making one hole and penetrating an inch 
of soft pine. I shot 2 sparrows on the wing, 
and missed so many others that it disgusted 
me, and I fell back on solid bullets and a 
repeater. The new 22, greaseless bullet, 
smokeless powder cartridge is a dandy. It 
has a much harder bullet than the ordinary 
22 black. It carries up to all short ranges, 
shoots remarkably true, is cleaner than 
anything ever before invented in this am- 
munition, and is cheap. 

Another new thing on the local market 
is the Robin Hood smokeless powder for 
shot guns. This is a good, strong, clean 
and quick product, and the manufacturers 
have resolutely kept out of the combine 
into which Peters and other companies 
have gone. Robin Hood took my fancy 
from the start and I have used many hun- 
dred loads of it with excellent results. It 
is a moist burning powder, giving great 
velocity and little recoil. It is loaded by 
bulk measure, and as much as 3^ and ^34 
drams may be fired in a 12 bore without 
discomfort. The Robin Hood people are 
putting on the market their factory loaded 
shells and these can now be obtained in 
Topeka and in Kansas City, Mo,. If any 
of the Western readers of this magazine 
have used Robin Hood I wish they would 
let me know how they like it, and we can 
compare results. 

Chas. H Morton, Topeka, Kan. 



A BIT OF RIFLE TALK. 

As some of your readers know, I am one 
of those rabid rifle cranks who never rest 
content until they have tried every new 
weapon and rifle or cartridge that is put 
forward. 

Yesterday I finished a few experiments 
with the new 35 caliber Winchester. As a 
result, I'm sore, not about the gun, but 
about the shoulder. 

The 35, to my notion, is a happy medium 
between the much discussed 30s and the 
many large calibers. The advocates of 
each will find their favorite points embod- 
ied in this new cartridge. While the 30-40 
has long been my favorite, I have often 



GUNS AND "AMMUNITION. 



135 



wished for just a wee bit more stopping 
power. I had deer and elk run away from 
me last fall in Colorado which, by all the 
rules of gun lore, should have dropped in 
their tracks. The 30-4OS would tear all 
kinds of holes in them, but still some ani- 
mals were not persuaded to stop short of 
many yards. Shot with this new 35, with 
its heavier ball and higher velocity, I be- 
lieve few animals will cover 20 yards after 
being struck. 

On examination the shell showed 50J/2 
grains powder behind a 252 grain ball. The 
velocity is 2,200 feet a second. The tra- 
jectory almost equals that of the 6 m-m 
navy arm. A better hunting rifle for big 
game will be hard to find. 

But one thing I strongly advise my 
brother cranks to remember, when using 
the gun. Get the thickest recoil pad on the 
market and fit it to a shot gun butt piece; 
don't order the gun with rifle butt for ap- 
pearance sake. The Winchester people still 
insist on furnishing graduated sights with 
their high power guns. What for, I don't 
know. Try the Lyman leaf sight ; fold 
down the crotch, raise the bar and keep it 
raised, and use the ivory bead for front. 
Practice with these and you will be in 
much better game shooting trim next fall 
than if you use globe, peep, crotch and 
other useless sights. These latter are well 
enough for target shooting, but any hunter 
will tell you the difference between that 
and game killing. 

Try this new caliber, brother cranks, and 
let us hear from you. 

Oklahoma, Minneapolis, Minn. 



THE LIMIT WITH A .303 SAVAGE. 

Last summer I bought a Savage, .303, 22 
inch barrel, and I find it a sure killer for 
big game. The sportsman who invests in a 
•303 gets the best big game gun on the 
market. With all due respect to the Win- 
chester people and other good makers, the 
Savage is -the most up to date and the 20th 
century weapon. Fitted with Lyman com- 
bination rear sight and Lyman ivory "Jack" 
front, it is simply perfection. 

Leaving Middletown, Conn., October 10, 
1902, accompanied by Dr. Barnes, of New 
London and W. T. Dewart, of New York, 
West Branch pond, Maine, was safely 
reached by 8 p. m. Saturday. The last 4 
miles we made by the aid of the doctor's 
bicycle lantern. Hunting, the first few 
days, was unfavorable on account of high 
winds and the dry condition of the leaves. 

The 17th changed conditions a little; 
rain had fallen Thursday night and early 
Friday morning and, with a light,steady 
wind, made prospects more favorable for a 
good day's sport. In just one hour from 
camp I brought down a fat doe ; one shot 
from the little gun was sufficient. Satur- 



day and Monday more high wind and dry 
leaves made it next to impossible to get 
near game. Rain Monday night and until 
5 a. m. Tuesday, October 21, preceded an 
ideal day for hunting. At 7.30 Charles and 
I started to look for a big buck. At 9.25 
the Savage cracked again, and there lay a 
fine fellow, with an excellent head. One 
shot from the little gun had done the deed. 

The same day I brought down a bull 
moose with 8 points. One shot would have 
been enough for the old fellow, for he 
leaned against a tree until I got within 40 
feet of him and sent another bullet into 
his neck to end his misery. My first shot 
ploughed through his liver, cutting it into 
fragments, and proving conclusively the 
great killing power of the Savage. 

There is no better guide in the Maine 
woods than C. H. Randall; his camp ac- 
commodations and table board are fault- 
less. 

William Duncan, Middletown, Conn. 

THAT WOODCHUCK AGAIN. 
For hunting wood-chucks I use a Lefevre 
12 gauge shot gun, especially if the grass 
is tall, and by a little strategy I have fairly 
good success. My load usually is 40 
grains Laflin & Rand powder, 1% ounce 
No. 7I/2 chilled shot. With that combina- 
tion I can get the chuck every time up to 
35 yards. I use a 32-40 rifle. It does not 
require much skill to get a chuck with that 
up to So yards; but for skill and fine 
snooting one should go out after the 
haying season is over, when a chuck can 
see and be seen across a 40 acre field or 
even farther. Then hold steady. At such 
times I have used the 30-30 with a Mogg 
telescope. With that combination one does 
not have to sneak far to get within range. 
I have killed a few chucks with the 22 
Winchester repeater. That does well if 
one is near enough to make the head the 
target; but if only hit in the body the 
chuck will get home. For lively shooting 
one should be in Kansas or Arizona, 
where the prairie dog pest is. There one 
can ride along and if his horse will stand 
fire, can keep a 22 warm. These little fel- 
lows look out from the mouths of their 
holes and if they are not hit in the head 
they usually get in out of reach. Here in 
Central New York there is little use for a 
rifle larger than 25 or 30 caliber, unless it 
may be for target practice, and even then 
the 22 with its variety of cartridges will 
furnish lots of amusement. 

H. H. Vary, Skaneateles, N. Y. 



SMALL SHOT. 

I note the article by the gentleman who 

so freely expressed himself in March 

Recreation in regard to Savage rifles. I 

have a Savage .303 which I have used for 



135 



RECREATION. 



the past year, and I have never hack -it jam, 
stick or go wrong in any way. I have 
seen men who knew no better than to place 
the cartridges in the magazine wrong end 
first. Naturally in such a case the 
action would balk. Have had the pleasure 
of using both Winchester and, alas ! Mar- 
lins, but would not exchange my Savage 
for either of them. I surmise that if there 
was any trouble with that Savage the man 
behind the gun was responsible. 

I reload my own cartridges and use 
them over and over. My perfect target 
and small game load is 15 grains Sav- 
age No. 1, smokeless powder, and a 32-20 
Winchester 115 grain soft point bullet. The 
32.20 bullet is exactly the same diameter as 
the .303 namely, .311. I use the Winches- 
ter reloading tool and prefer it to the 
Ideal, as the cartridge is crimped and re- 
sized its full length all in the operation of 
reloading. 

Would like to hear from someone who 
has used the Magniscope rifle sight for 
hunting purposes. 

Ralph K. Mussey, Warren, N. H. 



There is no better nor neater gun made 
than the Ithaca. For shooting qualities no 
gun can beat it. I have used a No. 4 
grade which made a pattern of over 400; 
and one can have an Ithaca made to order 
without extra cost. 

The Winchester 25-35 is as nearly an all 
around gun for this country as one will 
find. I used small loads of black powder 
and hard bullets for small game and find 
it just the thing for rabbits, grouse, etc. 
With 'a full load of smokeless powder and 
soft point bullets it would be all right for 
deer. 

I have also used the 22 Marlin. When 
the magazine is full, there is trouble, but 
when I had in only 15 cartridges it would 
work as smoothly as any gun. For all 
that I would not get another till they fix 
the action, for, -when one is out after big 
game, he does not want it all to escape. 

Will- some reader tell me his experience 
with the 33730 Winchester with full load 
black powder and wire patched bullets? 
Also small loads with same bullet; also 
King's semi-smokeless, same loads? 

M. E. Daniels, Orrock, Minn. 



Some of the men who rush into print 
and tell of the merits and demerits of cer- 
tain rifles should give us satisfactory proof 
of their ability to hit a tomato can 5 times 
in succession at 60 feet. If some of these 
writers were to go into the back yard and 
try their skill at an inch target 50 feet 
away they would soon discover how easy 
it is to get on the outside of it. Then they 



might learn where the blame belongs when 
they shoot 200 or 300 yards and miss. 

They write of the killing power of dif- 
ferent rifles and it is enough to send a 
novice wrong on many good rifles to read 
such stuff. Every beginner should prac- 
tice with a good rifle at not over 75 feet, 
using a small target; and when he gets so 
he can put a ball into it once in a while 
and put all the rest within one inch of it 
he is fit to go after big game. 

Use a 32-40 or a 38-55 and if you can do 
good work at 50 to 75 feet on an inch tar- 
get you may bring home some game. If 
you use a black powder gun you will never 
be sorry, for it will not disappoint you. 
H. A. Plante, St. Johnsville, N. Y. 



H. P. Brown, of Auburn, N. Y., asks for 
information concerning a target rifle to 
cost him about $25. He does not state 
whether it is wanted for 25 yard gallery 
shooting, or 200 yard range work ; or if 
the latter whether for off hand or rest 
shooting. I assume it is wanted for 200 
yards off hand shooting. In my 10 years' 
experience in range shooting I find that 
the majority of shooters use the 32-40 
cartridge, reloading the shells to suit their 
tastes. The Winchester single shot rifle 
for this cartridge is a good arm and wilL 
make 10 shot groups in a 4 inch circle at 
200 yards from a rest, with surprising 
regularity. Get a Swiss butt plate, mid 
ringed Vernier rear and wind gauge front 
sights, and procure a barrel to suit your 
strength. The No. 3 weighs about 9^ 
pounds and the No. 4 about 11 pounds in 
the 30 inch length; cost about' $18, plain 
stock. Have that target shooter's abom- 
ination, the Rocky mountain, or buckhorn 
rear sight, left off and no slot cut for it. 
V. R. Olmstead, New York City. 



It is amusing to read the experience of 
H. R. Van Sommel in February Recrea- 
tion. He has a 30-40 Winchester, tries it 
on boiler plates, steel rails and dead horses 
and finds it deadly on all. It is a pity he 
did not get his 30-40 6 or 7 years ago so he 
could inform the world of shooters of its 
terrible killing power. He says, "Come, 
brethren, be honest. Which is the most kill- 
ing gun, a 30-40 that whips a bullet through 
a 6 foot oak or a 45 that perforates one 
foot in soft pine?" Yet the makers of his 
rifle give its penetration as 50 inches of 
soft pine. 

Come, Brother Van Sommel, be honest. 
Just tell the readers of Recreation that 
you used a yard stick instead of a foot 
rule when measuring that 6 foot oak ; in 
future do not laugh at the .45 caliber since 
the new 45-90 high velocity bullet travels 
faster than the 30-40 bullet. When it 
comes to striking power, your 30-40 is not 



GUNS AND AMMUNITION. 



'37 



in it with the 45, as the base of your bullet 
barely covers the flat point of the 45. 

W. Mashck, Kewaunee, Wis. 



To Mr. Pierce I would say, I have al- 
ready related my experience with a 25-35 
and my article appeared in Recreation. I 
will never buy or carry another 25-35 on a 
deer hunting trip. If Mr. P. killed 4 bucks 
in 5 shots with one, he certainly got 
enough, and anyone who knows what a 
25-35 will do can say that he must have 
been right up where he could place his 
bullets. If the man with the 45"70, had the 
same chance as Pierce, one ball from that 
gun would have been enough, without the 
wire fence. Any man or woman who 
hunts deer will agree with me. 

Mr. Pierce may be a crack shot, but if 
he will come to Minnesota next fall and 
hunt in the tamarack swamps, pine stumps, 
and underbrush, it will worry him to pick 
up 4 deer in 5 shots. However, this fall 
I went back to a 30-30 Winchester, 20 
inch barrel and succeeded in killing 6 deer 
for a party of 2. My partner did the driv- 
ing and I did the shooting. No wounded 
deer got away from me. 

A. Huff, Minneapolis. 



In a recent number of Recreation a 
correspondent wrote of having trouble 
with his Savage rifle owing to the fact that 
the trigger and lever lock, or safety slide, 
soon became so loose as to slip backward 
and forward too easily. Several of my 
friends have had the same trouble with 
their rifles. This annoyance may be rem- 
edied by dismounting the rifle according 
to the instructions given in the Savage 
catalogue. Take out the trigger and lever 
lock, and make the slit in the rear end of 
the same a little wider, using a screw- 
driver or other instrument for the purpose. 
In order to prevent breaking, the lock may 
be fastened in a vise while widening the 
slit, but I did not find this necessary. The 
lock may be made to work hard or easily, 
depending on how much you widen the 
slit. The whole operation may be finished 
within half an hour. My ignorance of how 
to remedy this trouble cost me several 
good chances at deer and turkeys last year. 
John C. Futrall, Fayetteville, Ark. 



Under the Heading "A 12 Guage Load" I 
note Frank A. Wood is advised to use 
38-42 grains of Laflin and Rand powder. 
This is all right ; I have used 45 grains 
safely; but with the new Laflin and Rand 
Infallible this will not do. Thirty is the 
limit in 12 guage. With this powder, or 
Ballistite in ^4 base shells, the load can not 
be improved ; but 26 grains is enough for 
a Ballistite load. 

Cleaning .30 caljber rifles is vexatious, 



but get a Remington-Lee. The action 
can be dismounted in a moment, and you 
can get at both ends of barrel at once. Be- 
sides the ease of cleaning you will have 
the best rifle made in America. A look 
through one of these barrels is a revelation 
in cleanliness and depth of rifling. They 
match a Mauser in cartridge, and the Rem- 
ington is made for all, while the Mauser 
is not in the same class with America's 
best gun,, notwithstanding the advertising 
the Mauser gets. 

S., Leadville, Colo. 



I have always used small bore rifles 
since the advent of smokeless powder am- 
munition. If you want a rifle for moose, 
deer and bear try the .32 caliber Win- 
chester Special if you care to reload for 
target practice or for use with telescope 
sights. If you do not care for the above 
sights I recommend the .33 Winchester. I 
have one of each and both give perfect 
satisfaction. I used the .33 last year in 
the woods and got 2 large bucks. This 
gun is light and handy, has 24 inch barrel, 
and is powerful. I prefer it to the .30-40 
on account of its lighter weight and larger 
caliber with a trifle more velocity. The 
rear sight is much nearer the eye than on 
other rifles, and it has a neat ivory hunting 
sight on front which can be changed for 
ivory bead front. It has a nicely rifled 
barrel, well finished inside and out, and 
very accurate. If the Savage or Marlin 
Companies make such barrels I have yet to 
see one. 

F. F. Cooley, Waterville, Me. 

I notice in Recreation a query from Mr. 
A. W. Crampton in regard to Robin Hood 
smokeless powder. I am using Robin 
Hood powder, both at the trap and for 
hunting. It is the best powder I ever 
used. I shoot a great deal at the trap and 
have used all makes of powder. For pat- 
tern and penetration Robin Hood, beats 
them all. Another good thing about it is, 
when you are through shooting you can 
clean your gun by simply wiping it out 
with a rag. 

All other powders leave a scum on the 
inside of the barrel that has to be scoured 
out with a brass cleaner. If Mr. Cramp- 
ton will give Robin Hood a fair trial he 
will never use any other powder. 

Will also say to Mr. Turf, of Pittsburg, 
that he can use Robin Hood smokeless 
powder in any kind of gun or shell, includ- 
ing brass shells. A black powder primer 
will explode it. 

J. N. Lund, Rochester, N. Y. 



When I was a boy it was my good for- 
tune to own a Hollis 16 guage gun. As 
smokeless powder had just come to no- 



138 



RECREATION. 



tice, I went to our old gunsmith^ and 
bought a quantity in bulk, not obtaining di- 
rections for loading it. Leaving my meas- 
ure set as for black powder, I loaded a lot 
of brass shells and wadded them heavily 
with 12 guage wads. The result was won- 
derful execution on rabbits, but the gun 
gave a sort of metallic ring and a sharp 
recoil when fired. It also burst about one 
quarter of the shells. On firing one at a 
fence board, to test penetration, the shell 
burst near the head. The other part of the 
shell, with shot and wads intact, was forced 
through the barrel and made a hole through 
the board as though by a bullet, with seem- 
ingly no injury to the barrel. Always fol- 
low directions in loading smokeless pow- 
der. J. D. Snyder, Lowell, O.- 



John Nordstrom complains in Recrea- 
tion of the deterioration of nitro powders, 
and asks if others have noted it. Another 
correspondent says that Remington guns 
do not shoot close enough to please him. 
For the benefit of both I describe a test I 
made recently. 

Powder, Robin Hood, loaded by Ken- 
nedy, of St. Louis, in 1897. Shells, Nitro. 
Loads, 3 drams powder, 1% ounces No. 3 
soft shot. Target, 8x5^ inches. Dis- 
tance, 40 measured yards. Gun, Reming- 
ton ejector, 12 gauge, 7% pounds, 30 inch 
ful choked barrels. Average number of 
pellets in target, 19. Perforation, 9-16 
inch in Florida pine. No. 3 shot was used 
because it happened to be in the old shells. 

Two year old DuPont gave good pene- 
tration, as, also, did one year old Ballistite. 
L. Shannon, Bonifay, Fla. 



I noticed in Recreation that J. F. Rob- 
erts would like to hear from someone who 
-has hunted woodchucks. I have ; with a 
.22 caliber Colt, using the short cartridge 
with black powder. I never lost a wood- 
chuck in the short time I hunted, as the 
distance was not great, and I hit them all 
in the head. 

My brother hunted woodchucks with a 
rifle, using 38 long Colt's, In 3 years of 
hunting he only lost one woodchuck. The 
year before, he used 22 shorts on a .22 cal- 
iber rifle, and did not secure any game, un- 
less it was hit in the head. 

F. S. Mathias, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



If I called the 25-35 any bad names, I 
will not take any back. Mr. Powell may 
keep his gun, as I have a 30-30 Winchester, 
which is a 10 times better gun. Any man 
who has hunted deer will agree with me. 
In 1901 I experimented with the 25-35 an d 
my partner and I brought home 5. deer 
between us. Aside from that, I lost a 
buck, shot through the upper part of the 
shoulders, and a large doe, shot through 



the flank. There being no snow, I could 
not follow or track them. 

A. Huff, Minneapolis, Minn. 



In answer to G. N. McKay's inquiry in 
January Recreation as to Marble's front 
gun sights, wOuld say, that I used one 
while on a hunting trip in St. Louis coun- 
ty, Minnesota, last fall, also one of their 
No. 1 hunting knives, a No. 5 axe and one 
of their compasses ; all of which I recom- 
mend as being all that is claimed for them 
by the manufacturers. These goods are first 
class in workmanship and material, and 
entirely satisfactory in use. 

Henry L. Seire, Morton, 111. 



I read in Recreation that W. A. Barr 
doubts the penetration of the 303 Savage 
rifle. The rifle will do just what the mak- 
ers claim. I tested mine on hemlock logs 
shot in the end. It gives it penetration of 
28 to 38J/2 inches ; and crosswise of the 
grain 39 to 45 inches. My next test was 
made in clear white pine boards, cross- 
wise of the grain, and the penetration was 
48^2 to 53 inches. 

H. C. Watson, York, Pa. 



Replying to H. C. Clark's inquiry about 
shooting balls in a cylinder bored shot gun : 
If the barrels are reasonably heavy and 
'strictly parallel in bore, such a gun will 
do satisfactory work. The ball should be 
a little smaller than the bore, so it will 
take a patch. It should be seated on a 
y 2 -'mch. felt wad over powder. I have done 
great execution on deer with such loads. 
W. A. Linkletter, Hoquiam,' Wash. 



I wish some reader who has used the 
Magniscope rifle sight would write of his 
experience with it. It does not elevate, 
therefore I do not see that it would be of 
any use except at close range. 

•30-30, Westmount, Can. 



What is the best caliber for game up to 
coyotes? Buck Shot, Milnor, N. Dak. 



Recreation is sent me by an unknown 
friend, and I extend him my sincere thanks 
through the magazine. I am a traveling 
salesman. Recreation is very popular 
among the traveling men, and they all de- 
light in your frying pan. 

A. W. G., Elyria, Ohio. 



Recreation leads all sportsmen's journals. 
I like to see the fish and game hogs get 
roasted in Recreation, but the word "hog" 
is not mean enough for those long bristled 
fellows. They need it where the chicken 
got the ax. 

A, W. Stone, Morrisville, Vt, 



NATURAL HISTORY. 



When a bird or a wild animal is killed, that is the end of it. If photographed, it may still live and 
its educational and scientific value is multiplied indefinitely. 



HOW TO CATCH SNAKES. 

FRANK G. SPECK. 

In response to the inquiry of V. A. L., 
in December Recreation: It is difficult to 
induce a snake to enter a trap. In order 
to understand this, one must consider that, 
contrary to the laws governing most other 
animals, a regular or daily supply of nour- 
ishment is in no wise requisite to the snake. 
He takes his food at random, consequently 
a trap containing food might remain un- 
noticed indefinitely by the intended victim. 
Unlikely as this may seem, it can be readily 
understood by anyone acquainted with the 
snake's desultory nature. 

A plan, however, that has sometimes suc- 
ceeded is to fasten a frog or a mouse by 
the leg to a stake in a snake-frequented 
locality, allowing the creature room to 
move about freely. If a hungry snake 
approach, he is likely to devour the bait, 
thereby securing himself to the stake by 
the same ties that held the tempter. The 
sort of bait used in each case must be in 
accordance with the snake's customary 
diet; toads, frogs, mice or birds for the 
Cratalus and his relatives. In addition, 
•the copperhead is fond of the wood frog, 
Rana sylvatica. The trapper, however, 
must attend his traps often, for in a short 
time the process of digestion will dissolve 
the swallowed bait and the cord will be re- 
leased ; likewise the snake. 

Another method, even less certain than 
the former, is to bury jugs, leaving their 
mouths level with the ground, in the prox- 
imity of a snake den, preferably near a 
hole. In this case there is the probability 
of some ophidian rambler entering in search 
of peace and quiet. When once within he 
will be obliged to remain on account of 
the smooth interior of the quasi-snake- 
hole. 

As V. A. L. inquires merely about traps 
for catching reptiles he is presumably 
aware of the forked stick apparatus, which 
is most satisfactory and efficacious in use. 

"Is there any way to remove the poison 
glands of a rattlesnake?" Yes. By the 
careful use of a lancet the entire system of 
fangs, including the embryonic stages, may 
be so thoroughly removed that they will 
never grow again. From that time forth 
the snake necessarily starves, for, deprived 
of his natural method of taking food, he 
will adopt no other. The process of stuf- 
fing, however, can often be successfully 
practiced ; and the number of alleged snake 
charmers who employ this artificial means 
of administering nourishment attests its 
adequacy. The removal of the fangs alone 



results in their speedy replacement by others 
forming from embryos situated immediate- 
ly posterior to the fang proper. It is im- 
portant, when venomous snakes have thus 
been operated on, to wash their mouths 
frequently, as tlie secretion of virus by the 
entire system and its concentration in the 

> 




f 



mouth is by no means deterred by the ex- 
traction of the glands. Consequently the 
bite of a fangless rattler is dangerous 
merely from what venom has become 
mingled with the other juices resident in 
the mouth. It is also noteworthy that in 
these snakes the tendency- to strike is much 
lessened. They often seem to realize their 
condition, accepting their fate with pain- 
ful resignation. 

As regards the scientific antidote for the 
Crotalus bite, I can do no better than refer 
V. A. L. to the investigations of the late 
Dr. Stejneger, who, in his admirable paper 
on the venomous snakes of North America, 
says : 

"Mitchell and Reichert had confirmed the 
destructive actiann of certjain chemicals, 
used as injections, on the venom, notably 
permanganate of potassium, ferric chloride, 
iodine and bromine. To these Kaufmann 
adds chromic acid, which he highly recom- 
mends as a remedy for local lesions." 

The first of these, permanganate of potas- 
sium, is to-day the most favored among 
those who are accustomed to handle venom- 
ous reptiles. There are, too, * countless 
rough and ready cures advised, some of 
which are helpful, some harmless and others 
decidedly nocent. Among the latter is 
ammonia, which destroys the veins and 
increases the heart action, thus working in 
direct conformity with the venom. 



A LONE FISHERMAN. 

W. O. DOOLITTLE. 

The past winter was severe in the village 

of P — . There was a scarcity of bird 

life. Nearly all the feathered inhabitants 
had deserted the place for a warmer coun- 



i39 



140 



RECREATION, 



try, and there were left behind only^a few 
of the hardier winter species, such as the 
jays, woodpeckers and chickadees. Even 
the Omnipresent and impudent English 
sparrows seemed to keep unusually silent 
and fought shy of the cold winter blasts 
which swept the snow-laden earth. 

Shortly after the opening of the New 
Year I chanced to be passing over a bridge 
which spanned a small river near the town. 
There I first met my lone fisherman. The 
day was bitterly cold. The wind was fierce 
and a driving sleet was falling. Suddenly, 
above the whistle of the wind, I heard a 
hoarse rattle. The sound was strangely 
familiar, yet I could not for the instant 
recall it. I heard it again, looked in the di- 
rection whence it came and the mystery 
was solved. 

Perched on a high telephone wire, which 
was strung across the river, was the blunt, 
top heavy and peculiarly shaped bird which 







x 



frequents our streams in early spring and 
summer. Surely it was our old friend, 
the belted kingfisher; but what was he do- 
ing here to-day? What strange fancy had 
•led him to remain at the frozen North, 
while his fellows were luxuriating in the 
sunny South ? Where could he find the 
fish with which to sustain life when the 
river was frozen over with ice a foot thick? 
My last question was soon answered. 

Under the bridge was a dam, which had 
been built to furnish water power for a 
mill, and the action of the water in running 
over this dam prevented a small place be- 
low from freezing. Through this hole in 
the ice must come a winter's store of pro- 
visions for our kingfisher. I was rewarded 
a moment later by seeing him swoop down 
to the water with a heavy splash and bear 
aloft a shining fish to his perch on the ice- 
bound wires. 

I visited the spot' many times after that 
and seldom failed to find him there. Day 



after day he sat on the wires, with his eye§ 
fixed on that precious spot. During the 
long, cold days that followed he remained 
and seemed to thrive, though the wind 
threatened often to dislodge him from his 
precarious position. There is splendid 
angling in that stream in the spring, but 
during those days, when the mercury hov- 
ered near the zero point, this bold bird was 
the sole pursuer of the finny tribe. Spring 
came at last and he was then joined by his 
relatives from the South. Later he be- 
came engaged in the respectable duties of 
providing for a family. Though none can 
tell what prompted him to remain North, 
yet who can help admiring his brave and 
•patient spirit? 

TAMING A WILD RABBIT. 

Around my suburban home lives a re- 
markable rabbit. We saw him first in 
June. He was about half grown, and the 
children caught him and put him in a little 
house. The next morning he escaped, but 
the experience did not induce him to quit 
the neighborhood. A few days later we 
saw him again, eating young white clover 
on a recently seeded lawn. When he was 
approached he ran under the front porch. 
I determined to see if I could not tame him. 
After several attempts I succeeded in ap- 
proaching him with some willow brush, 
which he ate with evident relish. Some 
days later I offered him bread, which he 
also seemed to relish. About the first of 
July he was sufficiently tame so he allowed 
himself to be approached, and would sniff 
at any morsel that might be taken him. 
After several futile attempts I succeeded 
in getting a good photograph of him at a 
distance of 7 or 8 feet. Late, last fall he 
was plump and fat and a little larger than 
the average cottontail. I had thought him 
a full blooded wild cottontail, such as are 
numerous in the suburbs, but by fall he was 
so tame that I could examine him closely. 
He has a white mark on his nose. His left 
foot is white, and there is a little white 
on the edge of his ears ; also a fairly large 
white mark on his breast, which, however, 
does not show except when, rarely, he sits 
up on his haunches. 

During the winter we did not see him, 
and for a while I was afraid he had fallen 
a prey to some rabbit catchers that I had 
seen, or that a dog had found him napping ; 
but after some time I noticed his footprints 
leading under my front porch. Sometimes 
I find him under the porch at dusk, when 
he will come if I call him. Then he will 
disappear for 2 or 3 days and again reap- 
pear. He is now so tame that he can be in- 
duced to come up 5 or 6 steps on the 
kitchen porch for a meal of dry coffee 
cake, showing great fondness for the sugar 
on it. Once while he was eating, a dog 



NATURAL HISTORY. 



141 



passed on the other side of the house. Bun- 
ny's ears began to go back and forth and 
he hopped down the steps. 1 frightened 
the dog away and the rabbit at once re- 
turned to my call. He knows the members 
of the family and pays no attention to their 
goings and comings, but is always on the 
alert against strangers and dogs. I think 
he is a hybrid between the wild cotton- 
tail and some species of tame rabbit. It 
was not difficult to tame him, but he has 
inherited the remarkably watchful instinct 
of the wild cottontail. 

Have any Recreation readers made simi- 
lar observations? 

D. Lange, St. Paul, Minn. 



THE BITTERN, WOODCOCK AND OSPREY. 
Many explanations are given of the man- 
ner in which the bittern, Botaurus centig- 
inosus, makes his pumping call of "ker- 
plunk, ker-plunk,'' some claiming he makes 
it with his foot; others by plunging his 
head into the water. When out on a small 
lake one May morning I heard the familiar 
sound. I searched the reeds with my tele- 
scope, located the bird, cautiously paddled 
within 25 yards, focused the 'scope on him 
and soon he uttered his call. At that short 
distance a gurgling sound could be heard, 
•which seemed to begin low in the throat 
and to ascend. When this sound reached 
the mouth the neck shot out straight, the 
bill opened wide, and a loud "ker-plunk" 
was uttered several times. During this per- 
formance the bird looked if it were vomit- 
ing. I watched the bittern nearly an hour, 
and during that time it swallowed no water. 
I do not think water in the throat is, as 
some authorities claim, required for the ut- 
terance of the call. 

The song of the woodcock, Philohela 
minor, is not often heard, but is well worth 
listening to. One evening I was in a little 
swamp and heard a woodcock uttering his 
nasal "packe, packe." I aproached as near 
as possible and waited for him to tower. 
He soon did so. I could hear his wings 
swishing as he rose, and as soon as he com- 
menced to descend he began twittering a 
low, sweet song, which he continued until 
within a few feet of the ground. He de- 
scended near me and began his "packe, 
packe'' again. I could hear a "quer-r-up" 
prefacing each "packe." 
._ An _ osprey, Pandion haliactus caro- 
linensis, which I observed fishing, flew 
slowly over the water near, poised an in- 
stant, then dropped feet foremost into the 
water with a loud splash, making the spray 
fly in all directions. He failed twice, but 
secured a fish the third time. 

A. B. K., New York City. 



April on a foggy morning and finding a va- 
riety of birds in the riggings of the ship 
It is not the habit of small birds to migrate 
with herons. However, in a fog, which is 
worse than rain, they become so burdened 
with weight and exhausted they will alight 
on anything. No doubt the first birds at- 
tracted by lights long before daylight hov- 
ered about until they could see to alight. 
Nearly all birds when migrating start in the 
evening. Going North they start across the 
Gulf always with a gentle North wind, 
which assists them. Frequently adverse 
winds 'destroy thousands. While April is 
the month for all summer birds, our early 
spring birds cross the Gulf in February and 
March. Any April night with a breeze 
from the South the air is full of the dif- 
ferent calls of warblers, orioles, scarlet 
tanagers, summer tanagers, etc. The latter 
are rarely farther North than the middle 
of Indiana and Illinois. South America is 
the oriole's winter home. As soon as it 
has its young reared and all the tame cher- 
ries are gone one will find orioles where 
there are wild cherries. Moulting com- 
mences about July 1st, hence one then hears 
no song from them. In late August and 
early September they depart in easy stages 
until the coast is reached, feed for a few 
days and cross the Gulf. 

Via Rocks Smith, Oklahoma, O. T. 



PROBABLY A REDPOLL. 

What species of junco is it that wc see 
picking the seeds from weeds in the fields? 
They are seen mostly in large flocks. The 
birds have a pink spot on their throat and 
upper part of breast, which gradually light- 
ens into a gray farther down the breast and 
under the tail, which is quite long. I can 
generally tell this bird when I see it by the 
way it runs on the snow. When a flock 
has settled on a field there is constant 
squabbling over some choice seed. The 
English sparrows like to follow the flock 
about. The snowbirds do not object and 
appear to be peaceable. 

Clyde L. Williamson, Erstville, N. Y. 

ANSWER. 

The only junco found in New York is 
the slate colored junco, /. hiemalis. The 
bird described is probably the redpoll linnet, 
A cant his linaria. Linn. — Editor. 



In Recreation C. O. Moseley, M.D., of 
Lytle, Ga., mention crossing the Gulf in 



NATURAL HISTORY NOTES. 
In November Recreation A. C. Thatcher, 
Urbana, Ohio, inquires if any reader of 
Recreation knows of rabbits eating flesh. 
Yes, when flesh is frozen they will eat it. 
I have seen evidences of this at different 
times. In Northern Minnesota, in '89, I 
tried to poison wolves and used rabbits' 
flesh for bait. Several times there were 
fresh rabbit tracks to the bait, which was 



142 



RECREATION. 



gnawed, and a few steps away the" rabbits 
were lying dead, poisoned. 

The wolves did not in a single instance 
forget themselves. They always preferred 
to hunt, and thus obtain a warm meal, 
free from any dangerous charges. As long 
as the baits were visible the wolves walked 
respectfully by ; but when the snow cov- 
ered the baits, the beasts planted a mark 
on top of them. 

A. N. Wikander, Usk, Wash. 



I notice in Recreation the measurement 
of elk horns belong to W. C. Darling, of 
Henderson Harbor, N. Y. I have a set 
with the following measurements : Spread, 
53 inches ; length of left horn, SZV\ inches ; 
first prong, 22 inches; second prong, '17^ 
inches; third prong, i6^4 inches; fourth 
prong, 23^ inches ; fifth prong, 7^ inches. 
Right horn, 53 inches ; first prong, 21 ; 
second, 19; third, 15%; fourth, 22^4; fifth, 
13; around nut, iij^ inches; above nut, g%. 
inches. 

While mine are no longer, they are ex- 
ceedingly heavy, with extra long prongs 
throughout, very even and beautifully 
shaped. I brought these horns out from 
Taylor's fork of the West Gallatin river, 
in 1895. 

P. H. Tomlinson, Salesville, Mont. 



I have a deer's horn which grew in the 
crotch of an oak tree. The bottom of the 
stick is 7^ inches in diameter, the top of 
large branch 6 inches, and the small branch 
2*/2- The horn has 4 points. The wood 
grew around the horn between the second 
and third points and covered all but the 
tip of the second point. The points hang 
downward, while the base <of horn is 6 
inches higher than the outer end. Some 
rodents had gnawed the tips of 3 prongs. 
I should like to know, through Recreation, 
how the horn came in the crotch, and what 
animals gnawed the horn. It was 8 feet 
from the ground when cut. 

L. M. Badger, Ouaquaga, N. Y. 

Will Recreation readers please answer? 
— Editor. 



Recently I was strolling along the banks 
of a stream when I saw what appeared to 
be a bunch of dead leaves suspended from 
a branch. Closer inspection revealed the 
skeleton and feathers of a Western robin, 
Merula migratoria propinqua. The bird 
had evidently been carrying a piece of 
thread to its nest when it stopped to rest 
on the limb of a thornapple bush. This 
thread became caught around the feet of 
the luckless bird and afterward around a 
thorn on one of the branches. The bird was 
thus made a prisoner and left to beat out 
its weary life. I have heard of birds being 



caught around the neck with thread, horse- 
hair, etc., but never of one being executed 
with the noose about ifrs feet. 

L. H. McMorran, Spokane, Wash. 



I have been a reader of your magazine 
for some time, and have been much in- 
terested in the several departments. Re- 
cently I heard a story that might come 
under the head of natural history. A gen- 
tleman said that during the oil excitement 
on the Little Kanawha river in West Vir- 
ginia, some 35 years ago, he caught a cat- 
fish weighing 67 pounds, that had 2 squir- 
rels in its stomach. He also said that near 
the same place he once shot a duck in mid- 
stream, which disappeared before he could 
reach it. Some of the natives informed him 
that it had probably been captured by a 
catfish, and cited cases where fish had been 
caught with ducks in their stomach. 

Reader, Newport, Ohio. 



I should like to know where our com- 
mon wart toad is at this time of the year. 
Do they deposit their eggs in the water now 
and is the croaking of the alleged frogs in 
the spring made partly by the toads? That 
is my impression, but I do not know wheth- 
er it is correct. 

W. S. Hickox, Middletown Springs, Vt. 

ANSWER. 

The common toad gives a little whistle, 
and does not croak as frogs do. Toads are 
now in the water, laying eggs, the same as 
frogs ; but their eggs are daid in strings, 
while frogs' eggs are laid in bunches. — 
Editor. 



What is the best method of preserving 
birds and butterflies? 

William D. Crooks, Jr., 
Burlingame, Pa. 

ANSWER. 

Skin them, poison the skins with arsenic 
and alum, and either stuff with cotton and 
keep as unmounted skins, or have them 
mounted by taxidermists. 

To preserve butterflies, mount each one 
on an insect pin, spread the wings on a 
drying board until dry, then place in an 
exhibition box, which should be as nearly 
as possible air tight and insect proof. 

W. T. H. 



John Sickels, living here in Chicago, has 
a pet gray squirrel. He says in the sum- 
mer, when butterflies are plentiful, it will 
eat them with a relish. It is fond of small 
birds. The squirrel will pick all the feath- 
ers off a bird and eat the flesh ravenously. 
I have seen many gray squirrels, but never 
sew one that would eat flesh. What do 
you think about a squirrel eating meat? 
H. C. Beahler, Chicago, 111. 



THE LEAGUE OF AMERICAN SPORTSMEN. 



GENERAL OFFICERS 

President, G. O. Shields, 23 W. 24th St., 
New York. 

1st Vice-President, £. T. Seton, 80 West 
40th St., New York. 

2d Vice-President, W. T. Hornaday, 2969 
Decatur Ave., Bedford Park, N. Y. 

3d Vice-President, Dr. T. S. Palmer, 
Dept. of Agriculture, Washington, D. C. 

4th Vice-President, A. A. Anderson, 80 
West 40th St., New York. 

5th Vice-President, Hon. W. A. Rich- 
ards, General Land Office, Washington, 
D. C. 

Secretary, A. F. Rice, 155 Pennington 
Ave., Passaic, N. J. 

Treasurer, Austin Corbin, of the Corbin 
Banking Co., 192 Broadway, New York. 

ALASKA DIVISION. 
Dr. E. M. Rininger, Chief Warden, Nome. 

ARIZONA DIVISION. 
M.J. Foley, Chief Warden, Jerome. 
ARKANSAS DIVISION 

W. R. Blockson, Chief Warden, Eureka Springs. 

CALIFORNIA DIVISION. 
Dr. David Starr Jordan, Chief Warden, Leland 
Stanford University. 

COLORADO DIVISION. 
A. Whitehead, Chief Warden, 303 Tabor Building, 
Denver. 

CONNECTICUT DIVISION. 
Hon. F. P. Sherwood, Chief Warden, Southport; 
Dr. H. L. Ross, Vice-Warden, Canaan; H. C. Went, 
Sec-Treas., Bridgeport. 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA DIVISION. 

C. H. Townsend, Chief Warden, U. S. Fish Com- 
mission. 

FLORIDA DIVISION. 
W. W. K. Decker, Chief Warden, Tarpon Springs 

GEORGIA DIVISION. 
J. J. Doughty, Chief Warden, Augusta. 
IDAHO DIVISION. 

L. A. Kerr, Chief Warden, Kendrick 

ILLINOIS DIVISION. 

M. D. Ewell, M.D., Chief Warden, 59 Clark St., 
Chicago ; F. M. Taber, Vice Warden, 144 Kinzie 
St., Chicago ; G. C. Davis, Sec-Treas., 123 S. Central 
Ave., Austin. 

INDIANA DIVISION. 
Frank L. Littleton, Chief Warden, 30^ East 
Washington St., Indianapolis ; J. J. Hildebrandt, 
Vice Warden, Logansport ; T.J. Carter, Sec-Treas., 
State House, Indianapolis. 

IOWA DIVISION. 
Carl Quimbv. Chief Warden, Des Moines; C. C. 
Proper, Sec-Treas., Des Moines. 

KANSAS DIVISION. 

O. B. Stocker, Chief Warden, Wichita; A. J. 
Applegate, Sec-Treas., 113 E. 1st St., Wichita 

KENTUCKY DIVISION. 

Geo. C. Long, Chief Warden, Hopkinsville. 
R. L. Brashear, Sec-Treas., Bowling Green. 

MAINE DIVISION. 

Col. E. C. Farrington, Chief Warden, Augusta. 

MARYLAND DIVISION 

J. E. Tylor, Chief Warden, Baltimore. 
MASSACHUSETTS DIVISION. 

Heman S. Fay, Chief Warden, Hazleton Block, 
Marlboro; J. E- Tweedy, Vice-Warden, North Attle- 
boro : A. C. Lamson, Sec-Treas., 194 Main St., 
Marlboro. 

MICHIGAN DIVISION. 

J . Elmer Pratt, Chief Warden, Grand Rapids ; R. 5 . 



Woodliffe, Vice-Warden, Jackson; A. B. Richmond, 
Sec-Treas., Grand Rapids. 

MINNESOTA DIVISION. 
Dietrich Lange, Chief Warden, 2294 Commonwealth t 
Ave., St Paul. 

H. A. Moigan, Vice-Warden, Albert Lea; Prof. 
O. T. Denny, Sec-Treas., St. Paul. 

MISSOURI DIVISION. 
Bryan Snyder, Chief Warden, 726 Central Bldg., 
St. Louis. 

MONTANA DIVISION. 
Professor M. J. Elrod, Chief Warden, Missoula; 
Sidney M. Logan, Vice- Warden, Kalispell ; R. A. 
Waagner, Sec-Treas., Bozeman. 

NEBRASKA DIVISION. 
Fred. E. Mockett, Chief Warden, Lincoln ; P. 
O'Mahony, Sec-Treas., Lincoln. 

NEVADA DIVISION. 
Dr. W. H. Cavell, Chief Warden, Carson. 
Geo. W. Cowing, Sec-Treas., Carson. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE DIVISION. 
Dr. A. F. Barrett, Sentinel Bldg., Keene, 
Sidney Conant, Sec-Treas., Keene. 
NEW JERSEY DIVISION. 
Percy Johnson, Chief Warden, Bloomfield; Dr. 
W. S. Colfax, Vice-Warden, Pompton Lakes; I. 
V. Dorland, Sec-Treas., Arlington. 

NEW MEXICO DIVISION. 

W. M. Borrowdale, Chief Warden, Magdalena. 

NEW YORK DIVISION. 
John R. Fanning, Chief Warden, Powers' Bldg., 
Rochester; Col. K. E. Moss, Vice- Warden, Wallaces 
Theatre, New York City; Dr. C. C. Curtis, Sec- 
Treas, Columbia College, New York City. 
NORTH DAKOTA DIVISION. 
Dr. W. D. Jones, Chief Warden, Devil's Lake. 
OHIO DIVISION. 

W. E. Gleason, Chief Warden, Mitchell Bldg., 
Cincinnati; A. C. Thatcher, Vice- Warden, Urbana. 
OKLAHOMA DIVISION. 

W M. Grant, Chief Warden, Oklahoma City. 

ONTARIO DIVISION. 
C A. Hammond, Chief Warden, Box 701, St. 
Thomas; D. L. Mells, Sec-Treas., St. Thomas. 

OREGON DIVISION. 

Robert F. Kelly, Chief Warden, Box 188, The 
Dalles; C. B. Cushing, Sec-Treas., The Dalles. 
PENNSYLVANIA DIVISION. 

C. F. Emerson, Chief Warden, 189 N. Perry St., 
Titusville ; Hon. C. B. Penrose, Vice- Warden, 172 j 
Spruce St., Philadelphia; E. Wager-Smith, Sec- 
Treas., 1026 Ridge Ave., Philadelphia. 

RHODE ISLAND DIVISION. 

Zenas W. Bliss, Chief Warden, 49 Westminster St., 
Providence. 

SOUTH CAROLINA DIVISION. 
C. F. Dill, Chief Warden, Greenville. 

SOUTH DAKOTA DIVISION. 

D. C. Booth, Chief Warden, Spearfish; John C. 
Barber, Sec-Treas., Lead. 

TENNESSEE DIVISION. 
Hon. G. C Martin, Chief Warden, Clarksville; 
Hon. Austin Peay, Jr., Sec-Treas., Clarksville. 

TEXAS DIVISION. 

Prof. S. W. Stanfield, Chief Warden, San Marcos ; 
W. E. Heald, Sec-Treas., San Angelo. 

UTAH DIVISION. 

Hon. John Sharp, Chief Warden, Salt Lake City. 

VERMONT DIVISION. 

W. E. Mack, Chief Warden, Woodstock; S. C; 
White, Sec-Treas., Woodstock. 

VIRGINIA DIVISION. 

R. G. Bickford, Chief Warden, Newport News. 
C. O. Saville, Vice Warden, Richmond; M. D. Hart, 
Sec-Treas., 1217 East Main St., Richmond. 
WASHINGTON DIVISION. 

F. S. Merrill, Chief Warden, Spokane ; F. A. Pon- 
tius, Sec-Treas., Seattle; Munro Wyckoff, Vice-War- 
den, Pt. Townsend, 



143 



144 



RECREATION. 



WEST VIRGINIA DIVISION. 
E. F. Smith, Chief Warden, Hinton, 

WISCONSIN DIVISION. 

Frank Kaufman, Chief Warden, Two Rivers; Dr. 
A. Gropper, Sec.-f reas., Milwaukee. 
WYOMING DIVISION. 
H. E. Wadsworth, Chief Warden, Lander; Frank 
Bond, Sec.-Treas., Cheyenne. 

Applications for membership and orders for badges 
should be addressed to Arthur F. Rice, Secretary, 23 W. 
St., New York. 

LOCAL WARDENS IN NEW YORK. 
County. Name of Warden. Address. 

New York, Conrad L. Meyer, 46 W. Broadway. 
Livingston M. De La Vergne, Lakeville. 
K.S. Chamberlain, Mt. Morris. 
Henry Skinner, Springwater. 
Dr. J. W. Cowan, Geneseo. 
Albany, CD. Johnson, Newtonville. 

" Kenneth E.Bender,Albany. 

Broome, John Sullivan, Sanitaria Springs 

R. R. Mathewson, Binghamton. 



Cayuga, 
Chemung, 

Cortland, 
Erie, - 



Essex, 

Franklin, 

Montgomery, 

Oneida. 

Orange, 



H. M. Haskell, Weedsport. 
Fred. U hie, Hendy Creek, 

M. A. Baker, Elmira. 

James Edwards, Cortland, 
E. P. Dorr, 103 D. S. Morgan 

Building, Buffalo. 
Marvin H. Butler, Morilla. 
W. H. Broughton, Moriah. 
Jas. Eccles, St. Regis Falls. 

Charles W Scharf, Canajoharie. 
J. M. Scoville, Clinton. 
Wilson Orans, Middletown. 

J. Hampton Kidd, Newburgh. 
Thomas Harris, Port Jervis. 
Lewis Morris, Port Richmond. 



Richmond, 

St. Lawrence, Dr. B.W. Severance, Gouverneur. 



Schenectady, 

Suffolk, 
it 

Tioga, 
Washington, 



Westchester, 



Dutchess, 
Columbia, 
Onondaga, 
Yates, 

Dutchess, 

Queens, 



A. N. Clark, 
J. W. Furnside, 
F. J. Fellows, 
P. F. Tabor, 
Geo. Wood, 
C.L.Allen, 

A. S. Temple, 
J. E. Barber, 
George Poth, 
Chas. Seacor, 

M. W. Smith, 
Ralph Gorham, 

} A. B. Miller, 

James Lush, 

B. L. Wren, 
Symour Poineer, 

Chas. H. DeLong, 
Jacob Tompkins, 



Sevey. 

Schenectady. 

Central Islip, L. I. 

Orient, L. I. 

Owego. 

Sandy Hill. 

Whitehall. 

Dresden. 

Pleasantville. 

57 Pelham Road, 

New Rochelle. 
Croton Falls. 
Mt. Kisco 

Jackson's Corners 

Memphis. 
Penn Yan. 
Branch Port. 
Pawling. 
Billings. 



Gerard Van Nostrand, Flushing, L. I 
W. S. Mygrant, 46 Elton Street, 



Ulster, 

Jefferson, 

Herkimer, 

Oswego, 

Putnam, 

Schuyler, 

Allegany, 

Schoharie, 

Warren, 

Orleans, 

Greene, 

Hamilton, 

Stark, 
Franklin, 



P. A. Geepel, 

L. B. Drowne, 

M. A. DeVall, 
Wm. S. Mead, 

C. J. Smith, 

D. F. Sperry, 
J. E. Manning, 
H. L. Brady, 
G. C Fordham, 

G. A. Thomas, 
O. E. Eigen, 
Geo. McEchron, 
J. H. Fearby, 
W. J. Soper. 
David Aird, Jr., 
LOCAL WARDENS 
A. Dangeleisen, 
Brook L. Terry, 



Cuyahoga, A. W. Hitch, 



Clark, 

Erie, . 

Fulton, 
Allen, 



Fred C. Ross, 
David Sutton, 

L. C. Berry, 

S.W.-Knisely, 



Brooklyn. 
473 Grand Ave., 

Astoria, L. I. 
119 Somers Street, 

Brooklyn. 
The Corners. 
Woodstock. 
Watertown. 
Old Forge. 
154 West UticaSt. 
Mahopac Falls. 
Watkins. 
Belvidere. 
Sharon Springs. 
Glen Falls. 
E. Shelby. 
Windham. 
Lake Pleasant. 
IN OHIO. 
Massillon. 
208 Woodward Av., 

Columbus. 
161 Osborn St., 
Cleveland. 
169 W. Main St., 

Springfield. 
418 Jackson St., 

Sandusky. 
Swanton. 
Lima. 



Address. 
4465 EasternAve., 

Cincinnati. 
Mt. Vernon. 
Elyria. 
Lakeside. 
Zanesville. 
Portsmouth. 



County. Name of Warden. 

Hamilton, W. C Rippey, 

Knox, Grant Phillips, 

Lorain, T. J. Bates, 

Ottawa, Frank B. Shirley, 

Muskingum, Frank D. Abell, 
Scioto, J. F. Kelley, 

LOCAL WARDENS IN CONNECTICUT. 
Fairfield, George B. Bliss. 2 Park Row, Stam- 

ford, Ct. 
Harvey C. Went, 11 Park St., Bridge- 
port, Ct. 
Samuel Waklee, Box 373, tetratford. 
Dr. H. L. Ross, P. O. Box 100, Ca- 
naan, Ct. 
Sandford Brainerd, Ivoryton. 
Wilbur E. Beach, 318 Chapel Street, 
New Haven Ct, 
D. J. Ryan, 188 Elizabeth St.. 

Derby. 
WARDENS IN MASSACHUSETTS. 
Orlando McKenzie, Norfolk. 
J.J. Blick, Wrentham. 

S. W. Fuller, East Milton. 

Capt. W. J. Stone. 4 Tremont Row, 



Fairfield, 
Litchfield, 

Middlesex, 
New Haven, 



LOCAL 
Norfolk, 

cc 

Suffolk, 



Worcester, 

LOCAL 
Mercer. 



B. H. Mosher, 

WARDENS IN 



Boston. 
Athol. 

NEW JERSEY. 



Morris, 



Somerset, 

Sussex, 

Union, 

Warren, 

Monmouth* 
Hudson, 

LOCAL 
Jefferson, 
Perry, 
Warren. 

Juniata, 

Venango, 
Potter, 



Crawford, 



Cambria, 

Butler, 

Allegheny, 

Beaver, 

McKean, 



Lackawanna, 

Carbon, 
Cumberland, 
Wyoming, 
Tioga, 

Lycoming, 

Delaware, 

Montgomery, 

Bradford, 

Clarion, 

Ca,meron, 

Clinton, 

Northumber- 
land, 
Elk, 
Fayette, 



Edw. Vanderbilt, 
Roland Mitchell, 

F. C. Wright, 
Joseph Pellet, 
Chas. W. Blake, 
Francis E. Cook, 
Calone Orr, 

G. E. Morris, 



Dentzville, 

Trenton. 
739 Centre St., 

Trenton. 
Trenton. 
Pompton Plains. 
Dover. 
Butler. 
Hibernia. 
Somerville. 



Isaac D. Williams, Branchville 



A. H. Miller, 
CM. Hawkins, 
(Jacob Young, 
I Reuben Warner, 
Dory-Hunt, 
A. W. Letts, 



Cranford. 
Roselle. 

Phillipsburg. 

Wanaque. 
51 Newark St., 

Hoboken 



WARDENS IN 
John Noll, 
Samuel Sundy, 

F. P. Sweet, 
Nelson Holmes, 
Clifford Singer, 
Ezra Phillips, 

G. D. Benedict, 
Ira Murphy, 
Wiley Barrows, 
Chas. Barrows, 
Jasper Tillotson, 
Geo. T. Meyers, 
J. B. Lamb, 
W.H.Lambert, 



PENNSYLVANIA. 

Sykesville. 

Lebo. 
Goodwill Hill. 

Cornplanter. 

Oakland Mills. 

McAlesterville- 

Pleasantville. 

Coudersport. 

Austin. 

Austin. 

Tillotson. 

Titusville. 
Buel. 

720 Coleman Ave., 
Johnstown. 

Murnnsville. 
Natrona. 

Beaver Falls. 



F. J. Forquer, 

S. H.Allen, 

N. H. Covert, 

W. R. Keefer, 

C. A. Duke, 

L. P. Fessenden, 

Wm. Holsinger, 

Wm. Weir, 

Wm. Major, 

Asa D. Hontz, 

J.C. Gill, 

Cyrus Walter, 

E. B. Beaumont, Jr., 

G. H. Simmons, 

Jas. J. Brennan, 

B. D. Kurtz, 

Walter Lusson, 

L. C. Parsons, 

Geo. B. Loop, 

Isaac Keener, 

Harry Hemphill, Emporium. 

M. C. Kepler, Renovo. 

Geo. L. Kepler, Renovo. 
( G. W. Roher, 
[ 1505 Anthracite St., Shamokin 

D. R. Lobaugh, Ridgway. 
Ely Cope, Cadwallader. 



Duke Center. 

Granere. 

Stickney. 

Moosic. 

it 

East Mauch Chunk. 
Mechanicsburg. 

Tunkhannock. 

Lawrenceville. 

Westfield. 
Oval. 
Cammal. 
Ardmore. 
Academy. 
Sayre. 
New Bethlehem. 



THE LEAGUE OF AMERICAN SPORTSMEN. 



145 



LOCAL WARDENS IN MICHIGAN. 
County. Name ot Warden. Address. 

Ottawa, W. H. Dunham, Drenthe. 

Kalamazoo, C. E. Miller, Augusta. 

Berrien, W. A. Falmer, Buchanan. 

Cass, Thomas Dewey, Dowagiac. 

Hillsdale, C. A. Stone, Hillsdale. 

Lake, John Trieber, Peacock, 

LOCAL WARDENS IN VIRGINIA. 
Mecklenburg, J.H.Ogburn, South Hil. 

King William, N. H Montague, Palls. 

Smythe, J.M.Hughes, Chatham Hill. 

King & Queen, R. D. Bates, Newtown. 

Louisa, J. P. Harris, Applcgrove. 

Henrico, W. J. Lynham, 412 W. Marshall. 

Richmond- 
East Rockingham, E.J.Carickhoff, Harrisonburg. 

LOCAL WARDENS IN WYOMING. 
Fremont, Nelson Yarnall, Dubois. 

Ui ^. {f.L. Person, |J«*««- 

Carbon, Kirk Dyer, Medicine Bcw. 

Laramie, Martin'Breither, Cheyenne. 

LOCAL WARDENS IN TENNESSEE. 
Sumner, W. G. Harris, Gallatin. 

Stewart, I onn H - Lor yi ^ear Spring. 

Robertson, C. C Bell, Springfield. 

Montgomery, P. W. Humphrey, Clarksville. 

Madison, H. T. Rushing, Jackson. 

LOCAL WARDENS IN NEBRASKA. 
Hall. E. C. Statler, Grand Island 

LOCAL WARDENS IN NEW HAMPSHIRE. 
Cheshire, S. C. Ellis, Keene. 

Sullivan, G. A. Blake, Lempster. 

" J. W. Davidson, Charlestown. 

LOCAL WARDENS IN VERMONT. 
Rutland, Wm. J. Liddle, Box 281, Fair Haven 

Windsor, F. A. Tarbell, West Bridgewater. 

Orleans, E.G.Moulton, Derby Line. 

Essex, H. S. Lund, Granby. 

LOCAL WARDENS IN ILLINOIS. 
Rock Island, D. M. Slottard, 12th Ave and 17th 

St., Moline. 
Iroquois, J. L. Peacock, Sheldon. 

LOCAL WARDENS IN OKLAHOMA. 
Kiowa and Comanche Nation, 

A.C.Cooper, Ft. Sill. 

LOCAL WARDENS IN IOWA. 
Clinton, D.L. Pascol, Grand Mound. 

Pottawattamie, Dr. C. Engel, Crescent. 

LOCAL WARDENS IN WASHINGTON. 
Okanogan, James West, Methow. 

Stevens Co., Jacob Martin, Newport. 

LOCAL WARDENS IN UTAH. 
Washington, S. C. Goddard, New Harmony. 

J. A. Thornton, Pinto. 

LOCAL WARDENS IN KANSAS. 
Ness, Frank Lake, Ransom. 

LOCAL CHAPTERS. 
Albert Lea, Minn., ' H. A. Morgan, Rear Warden. 
Angelica, N. Y., C. A. Lathrop, 
Augusta, Mont., H. Sherman, " 

Austin, Minn., G. F. Baird, 

Austin, Pa., W.S.Warner, 

Boston, Mass., Capt. W. I. Stone, " 

Buffalo, N.Y., H.C.Gardiner, 

Cammal, Pa., B. A. Ovenshire. " 

Champaign Co., O. Hy. F. MacCracken 

Urbana, " 

Charlestown, N. H., W. M. Buswell, 
Cheyenne, Wyo., J. Hennessy, " 

Choteau, Mont., G. A. Gorham, 
Cincinnati, Ohio, B.W.Morris, " 

Coudersport, Pa., 1. L. Murphy, " 

Cresco, Iowa, J. L. Piatt, " 

Davis, W.Va., J. Heltzen, 

Dowagiac, Mich., W. F. Hoyt, '* 

East Mauch Chunk,Pa., E. F. Pry, " 

Evansville, Ind., F. M. Gilbert, 
Fontanet, Ind., W. H. Perry, " 

Ft. Wayne, Ind., W. L. Waltemarth 
Great Falls, Mont., J. M. Gaunt, 
Heron Lake, Minn., K. C. Buckeye, " 

Hollidaysb'g, Pa., T. J. Hemphill 
Hopkinsville, Ky., Hunter Wood, " 

Indianapolis, Ind., Joseph E. Bell, " 

Jerome, Ariz., Dr. L. A. Hawkins, " 

Johnsonburg, Pa., W. J. Stebbins, " 

Kalispell, Mont., Tohn Eakright, " 

Keene, N. H., F. P. Beedle, «• 



Kingfisher, Okla., A.C.Ambrose, Rear Warden. 
Lake Co., Ind., Dr. R. C. Mackey, 

Lawton, O. T., Marion Miller, " 

Lincoln, Neb., A.J.Sawyer " 

Logansport,Ind., E. B. McConnell, " 

Ludington, Mich., G. R. Cartier, " 

Mechanicsburg, Pa., Dr. J. H. Swartz, 
Minturn, Colo., A. B. Walter, 
Morgantown, W. Va., B. S, White, " 

New Aloany, Ind., Dr. J. F. Weathers, 
New Bethlehem, Fa., Isaac Keener, 
Oklahoma City O.T., N. F. Gates, " 

Penn Yan, N. Y., Dr. H. R. Phillips, 
Phillips, Wis. F. K. Randall, 

Princeton, Ind., H. A. Y eager, " 

Reynoldsville, Pa., C. F. Hoffman, 
Ridgway, Pa., T.J.Maxwell, " 

Rochester, N. H., Gustave Andreas, 
N. Y., C. H. McChesney 
St. Paul, Minn., O.T.Denny, 
St. Thomas, Ont., L.J.Hall, 
Schenectady, N. Y., J. W. Furnside, " 

Seattle, Wash., M. Kelly, 

Syracuse, N. Y., C. C Truesdell, 
Terre Haute, Ind., C. F. Thiede, 
The Dalles, Ore., C. B. Cushing, 
Walden, N. Y., J. W. Reid, 

Wichita, Kas., Gerald Volk, 

Winona, Minn., C. M. Morse, " 

DISCOUNTS TO LEAGUE MEMBERS. 

The following firms have agreed to give 
members of the L. A. S. a discount of 2 
per cent, to 10 per cent, on all goods bought 
of them. In ordering please give L. A. S. 
number: 

Syracuse Arms Co., Syracuse, N. Y. Guns. 
Davenport Fire Arms Co., Norwich, Conn. Shot 

guns, rifles. 
Gundlach Optical Co., Rochester, N. Y. Photographic 

goods. 
Blair Camera Co., Rochester, N.Y. Photographic goods. 
James Acheson, Talbot St.. St. Thomas, Ontario, 

Sporting goods. 

LIFE MEMBERS OF THE LEAGUE. 
W. D. Ellis, 136 W. 7 2d street, New York City. 
A. F. Rice, 155 Pennington avenue, Passaic, N. J. 
Dr. W. A. Valentine, 5 W. 35th street, New York 

City. 
A. A. Anderson, 6 E. 38th street, New York City. 
A. V. Eraser, 478 Greenwich street, New York 

City. 

E. S. Towne, care National Blank Book Co., Hol- 

yoke, Mass. 

F. G. Miller, 108 Clinton street, Defiance, Ohio. 
Gen. J. F. Pierson, 20 W. 52d street, New York 

City. 
E. T. Seton, 80 W. 40th street, New York City. 
J. H. Seymour, 35 Wall street. New York City. 
A. G. Nesbitt, Maple street, Kingston, Pa. 
D. C. Beard, 204 Amity street, Flushing, L. I. 

C. H. Ferry, 1720 Old Colony Bldg., Chicago, 111. 
Hon. Levi P. Morton, 681 5th avenue. New York 

City. 
H. Williams, P. O. Box 156, Butte, Mont 

D. B. Fearing, Newport, R. I. 

E. H. Dickinson, Moosehead Lake xvle. 
Lorenzo Blackstone, Norwich, Conn. 

A. L. Prescott, 90 W. Broadway, New York City. 

G. S. Edgell, 192 Broadway, New York City. 
W. B. Mershon, Saginaw, Mich. 

Hon. H. W. Carey, East Lake, Mich. 

George Carnegie, Fernandina, Fla. 

Andrew Carnegie, 2nd, Fernandina, Fla. 

Morris Carnegie, Fernandina, Fla. 

W. L. Underwood, 52 Fulton street, Boston, Mass. 

C. E. Butler, Jerome, Ariz. 

Mansfield Ferry, 183 Lincoln Park, Boulevard, 

Chicago, 111. 
Austin Corbin, 192 Broadway, New York City. 
J. Stanford Brown, 480 Fifth Ave., New York City. 
VV. H. Smith, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 
E. B. Smith, Bourse Bldg., Philadelphia, Pa. 
A. I. McClure, 158 State street, Albany, N. Y. 
T. Walter Thompson, Times Bide . Mew York City. 
Clinton Gilbert, 2 Wall St., New York City. 
E. J. Hudson, 33 East 35th St., Bayonne, N. J. 

There are thousands of men in the 
United States who should be life mem- 
bers. Why don't they join? Will some- 
one please take a club and w a ken them? 



146 



RECREATION. 



TO LOUISIANA SPORTSMEN. 

Here is a letter from a resident of your 
State, every word of which should be 
burned into your intellect so deeply that 
you can not forget it, until the slaughter 
and the traffic recounted in this letter shall 
be completely broken up. 

I have made many appeals to all the 
sportsmen in your State to join this League 
and to assist in securing the enactment of 
such laws in your State as are needed and 
as already exist in a majority of the States 
of the Union. Few men in your State 
have answered these appeals in any way. 
Now I put before you an appeal for help 
which comes to me from one of your own 
citizens. While you have ignored all my 
entreaties, you should certainly be willing 
to heed this one. 

I have sent Mr. Deimer a supply of 
printed matter explaining the nature and 
aims of the L. A. S., and am ready to send 
any quantity of this literature to anyone 
and to everyone in your State who will 
take it and use it. Are you not ready now 
to join the League of American Sports- 
men, and to aid in its good work? 

Let me hear from you. 

G. O. Shields, President. 

I have just been informed that some 
gentlemen in New Orleans are trying to 
get members enough in this State to start 
a division of the L. A. S., of which I am 
highly in favor. If ever a place needed 
the L. A. S. it is this State. We have deer 
and some bears and turkeys ; any number 
of quails, ducks and geese by millions in the 
winter;- but there are men here who make 
a business of hunting and shooting for the 
New Orleans market. I know one young 
man here who killed and ' marketed 1.800 
ducks last winter, and many other market 
hunters who killed nearly that many. Mar- 
ket hunting is practiced all along the 
Southern Pacific railroad, but not quite so 
extensively as here. The man who bnys 
the game of these hunters owns a large 
gasoline houseboat. In the fall he gets 
his crowd of hunters together, generally 
8 to 16 in number, gets them in the house- 
boat and runs down to the duck marsh. 
They stay there all winter and slaughter 
all the birds they possibly can. The mar- 
ketman buys everything they kill that is 
at all eatable. Generally he pays this scale 
of prices ; mallards, 25 cents a pair ; pin- 
tails, 20 cents a pair; teal and small ducks, 
15 cents a pair; geese and brant, 40 cents 
a pair. 

Will you kindly put me on the road 
where I can do the most good, for I 
should like to see this cruelty stopped. 

I am and have been a regular reader of 
your valuable and highly esteemed Recre- 
ation and I always look' forward with 
pleasure to each issue. 

W. C. Deimer, Jennings, La. 



LEAGUE NOTES. 
John J. Hildebrandt, vice warden of the 
Indiana division of the L. A. S., who lives 
at Logansport, Ind., is making trouble for 
the fish pirates in that region. He has put 
up a large number of League posters along 
the Wabash and tributary streams, and in 
addition has had a cloth poster of his own 
printed, which reads as follows : 

NOTICE. 
I hereby offer a reward of $25 to the person 
giving information leading to the arrest and con- 
viction of any person or persons who may dynamite 
fish in our rivers. — J. J. Hildebrandt, Warden of 
the League of American Sportsmen. 



Hon. L. A. Kerr, of Kendrick, Idaho, 
chief warden of the Idaho division of this 
League, has been appointed deputy State 
game warden for his district, and will at 
once inaugurate a vigorous campaign 
against game and fish law violators. It 
would therefore be well for all such to 
fold their tents and move to some other 
and more healthful ground. 



If I had to choose between Recrea- 
tion and 3 meals, I would go hungry a 
day. It is the cleanest and most honest 
magazine that I subscribe to. In fact, it 
has made me disgusted with some I take, 
and I have discontinued one of the lot. If 
the rest do not stop publishing fish and 
game hog stories, there will be more cut- 
ting. I have Recreation from the first 
issue, and would not part with it for 4 
times the price. Success go with you to 
the 100,000 mark and beyond. 

D. W. W. Mann, New Bedford, Mass. 



A Chicago firm prints this legend on its 
envelopes : 

He who whispers down a well, 
About the goods he has to sell, 
Will never coin the shining dollars, 
Like him who climbs a tree and hollers. 



While most of the leading magazines en- 
ter our house, Recreation is the only one 
I read the whole of, even to the advertise- 
ments. There is something drawing about 
it that can not be resisted. 

Horace W. Scandlin, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Client — I hope you will have those , di- 
vorce papers soon. 

Lawyer — What's the hurry? 

Client — Oh, I want to get unmarried and 
settle dawn. 



Recreation is the best publication of its 
kind I ever read. 

Wm. Bates, West Plains, Mo. 



Recreation is the only original sports- 
men's magazine. 

Ralph Willis, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



FORESTRY. 



EDITED BY DR B. E. FERNOW. 



It takes 30 years to grow a tree and 30 minutes to cut it down and destroy it. 



RETROGRADE MOVEMENT. 

June 17th the Trustees of Cornell Uni- 
versity abandoned the trust placed in their 
hands by the State, of conducting a College 
of Forestry. 

This unexpected, precipitate abandon- 
ment of a successful educational depart- 
ment was the result of the veto by the Gov- 
ernor of the usual annual appropriation 
of $10,000 for the maintenance of the col- 
lege, which appropriation the Legislature 
had made without any opposition. The 
Governor acted without previous notice and 
after the Legislature had adjourned. The 
responsibility of legislating this State in- 
stitution out of existence falls, therefore, 
entirely on him ; an arbitrary exercise of 
the veto power, which was probably not 
foreseen as possible when it was given. 

Altogether, the friends of a rational for- 
est policy for the State of New York have 
good reason to be dissatisfied with the lack 
of interest or the ill will on the part of the 
Executive, who, on the other hand, has al- 
ways given a willing ear to legislation in- 
imical to forestry interests. 

Under Governor Black's administration 
there was hope of a sensible and definite 
forest policy for the State. The Forest 
Preserve Board was created, to establish 
the State Forest Preserve, which was in 
the end to comprise 3 million acres. Funds 
for its purchase were judiciously appro- 
priated and spent ; the Forest Commission 
was properly supported ; and to prepare for 
an ultimate rational forest management a 
forestry school was endowed in Cornell 
University and a demonstration of forestry 
methods instituted in the Adirondacks. 
Under Governor Roosevelt all these agen- 
cies of a rational forest policy made fur- 
ther progress and were well supported. 

What has Governor Odell done? 

He has used his veto power to annul or 
restrict all these measures. The Forest 
Preserve Board still exists in name, to be 
sure, because the Legislature did not abol- 
ish it ; but the Governor last year vetoed 
the appropriation for further purchases and 
this year the Forest Preserve Board did not 
dare to lift its diminished head and ask for 
recognition of its existence and objects. 

We now learn from the newspapers that 
the New York Central Railroad contem- 
plates buying tracts in the Adirondacks for 
tie timber; and the State will have to pay 
for it! 

For the Forest Commission the Governor 
had a veto of an appropriation of $6,000 for 



reclamation of waste areas so auspiciously 
begun, a veto of an appropriation of $2,000 
for additional forest surveys, a veto of the 
salary of an assistant superintendent of for- 
ests ; all retrograde movements. Last of 
all, the entire appropriation for the State 
College of Forestry at Cornell was cut off 
by him. This is perhaps the worst blow, 
for it not only touches the interest of for- 
estry most keenly, but the honor of the 
State; for the State invited Cornell Uni- 
versity to institute this school and there is 
a moral obligation arising for the State 
toward the University as well as of the 
University toward the public, which it has 
invited to prepare and send their sons to 
the study of this new profession. 

Is not this little short of repudiation of a 
debt? Under such abuse of the veto power 
any State institution may cease to exist at 
the will of the Governor at a moment's 
notice. This was certainly not intended 
when the people gave the Governor that 
power, which was given to prevent "extrav- 
agant or obnoxious legislation." 

What was the reason for this overruling 
of the expressed will of the Legislature, 
which had without dissenting voice voted 
the regular supplies for this State institu- 
tion of 5 years' standing? Was the Col- 
lege unsuccessful ? The records do not 
show it. The College was remarkably suc- 
cessful in numbers and results. It doubled 
in number every year from 4 in the first to 
70 in the past year. Its graduates and a 
number, of special students, and even under- 
graduates, have found ready and profitable 
employment in Federal, State and private 
employ. Indeed, in numbers, at least, this 
College was ahead of all the German and 
French forestry schools; and no fault has 
ever been found, nor criticism heard of the 
College as an educational institution of the 
highest order. What, then, is the reason 
this successful branch of education, in 
which the State of New York and Cornell 
University were the leaders, had to be so 
suddenly cut off? 

The Governor did not attach a reason to 
his veto, as would appear proper, but the 
newspapers were inspired to supply it. The 
reason assigned is, that the College had 
been criticised by a legislative committee 
in its methods of conducting the demonstra- 
tion in the Adirondacks as wrong from 
the standpoint of scientific forestry. Who" 
are the judges? Is the wisdom of a legis- 
lative committee on professional methods 
and questions to be taken in preference to 



i47 



148 



RECREATION. 



that of a professional forester of the high- 
est standing? 

Inquiry into the methods pursued to bring 
about this report of the Committee, this ac- 
tion of the Governor and the attacks on 
the College and the University, preceding 
these, reveals an interesting situation. The 
money power of a set of aggrieved bank- 
ers, who did not like to have their hunting 
privileges curtailed by the operations of 
the College, private selfish interests and not 
public policy, are the background of this 
veto ! 

If the Trustees of Cornell University had 
caught the true spirit of the citizens of the 
State, they would not have yielded to the 
pressure, but would have gone on with 
dignity to carry out their part of the agree- 
ment, trusting to the justice of their posi- 
tion to have the matter righted when better 
counsels might prevail. 



PRIVATE OR STATE FORESTRY? 

In the face of the frightful havoc brought sud- 
denly to the homes of thousands of our citizens 
throughout the Eastern States in the shape of 
millions of acres of devastated forest land, one 
stands aghast that such destructive forest fires, 
with all their ruinous consequences, are,, still a 
matter of possibility at the beginning of the 20th 
century. 

For 2 decades or more a strong propaganda has 
been made for a more careful and conservative 
exploitation of the timber resources of the country 
through the application of scientific forestry rules, 
as adopted by other civilized nations. What has 
been accomplished? 

Instead of the inauguration of a healthy forest 
policy, having as its foundation adequate protec- 
tive measures, the very protection of invested cap- 
ital, without which scientific forestry becomes a 
farce, we see the government, both federal and 
State, catering to the wants of a few influential 
and wealthy persons by assisting them to enrich 
themselves at the general public's expense in the 
management of their respective properties. 

While the original intentions and aims of the 
Bureau of Forestry, at Washington, for instance, 
to disseminate general knowledge of the practical 
application of scientific forestry rules by giving 
free advice and doing private work gratis, may 
have been good and honest, there can be hardly 
any doubt that paternalism in the management of 
private forest lands by government officials has 
been and always will be an utter failure. 

The policy pursued so far has had the deplora- 
ble effect of putting our citizens to sleep in the 
belief that the future welfare of their forest hold- 
ings and their proper development and manage- 
ment would be safe in the hands of government 
employees; as if private and government interests 
ever did run in the same channels. 

Forestry in the United States will never amount 
to anything as long as the people will not awaken 
to the necessity of doing something themselves. 
Success of private forestry demands individual and 
independent exertion, without which it can not 
bring satisfactory returns to both employer and 
employee. » 

In many instances, such as the Whitney and 
Rockefeller tracts in the Adirondacks, hundreds 
of thousands of dollars could have been saved had 
private enterprise and exertion been given a 
chance. 

The experiences just gone through are a grim 
awakening to the undeniable fact that private in- 
terests and private property are safest in the hands 
"of responsible private persons instead of govern- 
ment employees. — Exchange. 



THE HISTORICAL NOVEL AND TREES. 

A decade ago the psychological novel enthralled 
us; recently it has b een the judiciously advertised 
historical novel. The newspaper tales of the enor- 
mous editions of historical novels are by no means 
so fantastic as they may read. A list, carefully 
compiled from publishers' returns which are abso- 
lutely without reproach, shows that the sales of 
9 recently published novels have reached astound- 
ing proportions. Of one book, over 400,000 copies 
have been sold. Another is in its 325th thousand. 
Less successful books have attained only a paltry 
sale of 100,000, while a few minor ones hardly 
exceed a disappointing 80,000. 

Books are made of paper. . Paper in turn is 
made of cellulose, of which the chief source of 
supply is timber. In order to describe the ro- 
mantic career of a 17th century gentleman of 
the rapier, it is necessary to fell a few hundred 
trees. The publication of many narratives in 
which the exploits of other cavaliers are dwelt on, 
may therefore entail the destruction of a forest. 

The 9 novels referred to had a total sale of 
over 1,600,000 copies. Since the average weight 
of each book sold was probably 20 ounces, a little 
calculation will prove that these 1,600,000 books 
contained approximately 2,000,000 pounds of paper. 
The average spruce tree yields a little less than 
half a cord of wood, which is equivalent to about 
500 pounds of paper. In other words, these 9 
novels swept away 4,000 trees, and they form but 
a small part of the fiction so eagerly read by the 
American public. Some books are worth more 
than 4,000 trees. What may be the tree value of 
the modern historical novel? — Exchange. 



SEEDLINGS. 
We appreciate highly your effort to create 
a public opinion in favor of preserving the 
remaining forests and wild game from total 
annihilation. The majority of the people 
believe in you, from the poorest farm la- 
borer up to the millionaire. We should 
have immediately an efficient forest fire 
brigade, such as other countries have, to 
watch for fires in the forests, and to see 
that fires do not get beyond control. Such 
a fire brigade should consist of regularly 
enlisted men, armed with carbines and uni- 
formed in khaki. 

M. H. Cole, Wellsburg, N. Y. 



An article in the February number of the 
Indian Forester on "Progress in the United 
States" opens with the following para- 
graph : 

How is it that the States have made more moral 
progress in forestry as a cause in 10 years than 
India has made or will make in a century? There 
are various reasons, but the fundamental one is 
that the President, Congress, and an increasing 
section of the people mean ; forestry, whereas in 
India the progress of the department has been a 
continual struggle with the people, and often with 
the local authorities. The other important reason 
is that the people of the States are educated to 
conviction. 



Stranger (in Kansas City) — I want to go 
from here to 7th street. Which is the 
quickest way to get there? 

Native Boy — Go right there to the edge 
o' this street an' fall off, mister. — Chicago 
Tribune. 



PURE AND IMPURE FOODS. 

" What a Man Eats JHe A." 

Edited by C. F. Langworthy, Ph.D. 

Author of "On Citraconic, Itaconic and Mesaconic Acids,'' " 1 ish as Food,'' etc. 



DANGERS 07 FL1E3 AND DUST. 

The spread of disease by flies and dust, 
and the precautions which should be ob- 
served in picnic grounds, where large num- 
bers of people gather during the summer, 
are noted in a recent number of the Sani- 
tarian. The following statements occur: 

"We now know that flies sometimes carry 
disease germs, and for that reason all foods 
and all eating stalls should be properly 
screened. Probably the protection to food 
afforded by glass cases and refrigerators is 
the only right way, for the little fruit flies 
will readily crawl through the meshes of 
ordinary screens. 

"The water supply of picnic groves is 
usually fair, for the springs and streams 
supplying them are generally from a wild 
and virgin upland. The water should be 
examined from time to time by an expert, 
especially during the picnic season, and all 
the precautions should be taken which are 
ro v/ell known and recommended for pub- 
lic supplies elsewhere. 

"Dust is another element to be consid- 
ered, not only on account of its unpleasant- 
ness, but as a dangerous element in carry- 
ing certain spores, especially those of tuber- 
culosis. Dust can be so readily kept down 
by sprinkling, and at so little expense, that 
we have a right to demand its elimination." 

The danger of spreading disease by 
means of flies is not limited to picnic 
groves. It has been proved by experiment 
that these insects can carry typhoid germs, 
which they gather by crawling over infect- 
ed material and feeding on it ; and it is 
more than probable that other diseases are 
sometimes transmitted in the same way. 
All possible pains should be taken, there- 
fore, to keep such insects away from food. 

Dust is also dangerous. Fruits and other 
sticky foods are often kept in markets un- 
der conditions which are far from sanitary. 
The dust from the streets adheres to their 
surface, and common cleanliness should 
compel everyone to make sure that the food 
is properly washed before it is used, espe- 
cially in the case of something which is to 
be eaten raw. Best of all would be meas- 
ures which would insure the handling, sell- 
ing, and marketing of these and all foods 
under sanitary conditions. 

In regard to the dust nuisance, Dr. J. O. 
Cobb, of the United States Public Health 
and Marine Hospital Service, says : 

"In many of our great cities we have so- 
cieties for the prevention of cruelty to chil- 
dren and animals, for the suppression of 
unnecessary noise, etc., but as far as I 



know, none that has attempted to reform 
the dust nuisance. New York and several 
other cities have tried various methods of 
street cleaning to ascertain which raised 
the least dust. Dividing one street up into 
sections, under certain individuals who are 
responsible to the inspectors, is the most 
effective method and the least objectionable. 
The individual broom method of sweeping 
up the droppings immediately does away 
with much use of water to sprinkle, and 
prevents the pulverizing and drying. Using 
the big street sweepers on wheels is alto- 
gether wrong, unless the street is kept con- 
stantly wet. Otherwise the act of sprink- 
ling, followed immediately by the sweeper, 
will stir up a cloud of dust. 

"Considering the dust raised by passing 
street cars, vehicles, horses and people, and 
the breathing of smoke and soot in cities like 
Pittsburg, Chicago and Cincinnati, it is little 
wonder that lung diseases comprise such a 
vast proportion of all our diseases and 
deaths. The pulmonary and bronchial 
lymph glands are essentially scavengers 
that stand guarding our bodies from bacte- 
rial invasion. They are pushed to their 
utmost capacity to perform this function ; 
and to give them the extra burden of ar- 
resting the foreign matter inhaled in dust 
is disastrous. Removing the consumptive, 
early in his disease, to a locality nearly free 
from all kinds of dust, will give him the 
best chance of recovery, principally because 
we have relieved his bronchial glands of 
this extra burden and have left them free 
to combat and arrest the onslaught of the 
tubercle bacillus. 

"Numerous experiments show that the 
number of bacteria in dust at the street 
level is many times greater than at the tops 
of high buildings ; that the air in the city 
contains a much greater proportion than 
the air of the country ; and the air of the 
mountains less than at the sea level. The 
dust of certain portions of a city will show 
a much greater bacterial content than other 
sections." 



MARKETING BEANS. 
Commercial bean-growing in the United 
States had its beginning in Orleans county, 
New York, about 1839, and for many years 
this region was the chief source of the sup- 
ply of dry beans found in the market. The 
present production in the State approaches 
2,000,000 bushels a year. New York prob- 
ably still produces more than any other 
State, though Michigan and California are 
close seconds. 



149 



ISO 



RECREATION. 



When the beans are ripe and the "crop i ? 
harvested, the whole plant is pulled. This 
was formerly done by hand, but now beans 
are harvested almost exclusively by ma- 
chinery. After the beans are gathered and 
dried, they are stored in barns like hay, 
until a convenient time for threshing. Ac- 
cording to J. L. Stone, of the Experiment 
Station at Cornell, the threshing is usually 
done by specially constructed machines 
much like the ordinary grain thresher, but 
some growers prefer the old fashioned flail, 
claiming that the saving in beans, which 
otherwise would be split, compensates for 
the slower work. Discolored and damaged 
beans, gravel and dirt of various sorts must 
be removed before the beans are ready for 
market. Much of this work can be done 
by machinery, but some of it must be ac- 
complished by hand picking. All the beans 
sent to market by New York growers are 
hand picked, which means that practically 
every bean is perfect. The matter of pre- 
paring the crop for market is now almost 
exclusively in the hands of the bean dealers. 
At a large number of the railway stations 
in the bean growing sections are bean 
houses, usually the property of a local pro- 
duce dealer who buys the crop of the local- 
ity. The farmer delivers his crop at the 
bean house, where it is sampled. The 
sample is weighed, picked, and weighed 
again to determine the loss by picking. 
The farmer is usually paid for the esti- 
mated quantity of picked beans which he 
delivers. At the bean houses the beans 
are run through special machines that re- 
move much of the refuse and sometimes 
grade the beans according to size. The 
hand picking is usually done by women and 
girls. The work is wonderfully facilitated 
by a mechanical device which causes the 
beans, thinly spread on a movable canvas 
apron, to pass slowly in front of the picker, 
who has opportunity to see each bean and 
time to pick out the gravel and damaged 
beans. By means of a foot- lever the op- 
erator controls the movement of the apron, 
and the rapidity of the flow of the beans, 
which are led by means of spouts from 
the storage room above. Some dealers ar- 
range to work so as to keep 10 to 20 per- 
sons employed throughout the year. 

The civil war, Professor Stone believes,- 
was a potent factor in extending the use 
of dried beans as human food in the United 
States. In 1861 the government began to 
buy beans for use in the army, and during 
the civil war production increased rapidly. 
At the close of the war the government de- 
mand ceased, but the soldiers had learned 
to eat beans and they carried the habit back 
with them into home life and induced 
others to eat beans. also. Thus began the 
demand for beans that has made possible 
the great development of the industry. 



Other causes have influenced the consump- 
tion of beans in certain localities, but none 
were of so widespread influence as the 
civil war. At the present tme, the practice 
of canning beans in convenient and attrac- 
tive forms is doing much to extend their 
use. 

_ Other phases of bean growing are of con- 
siderable importance in New York, though 
not rivaling the dry bean industry. Near 
the cities and towns the market gardeners 
produce large quantities of vegetable or 
snap beans to be put on the markets in the 
green state. The canning factories con- 
sume large quantities of sugar beans, 
which nearly mature, but without drying 
are put up in cans as shell beans. In cer- 
tain sections of the State considerable 
areas are devoted to growing the garden or 
vegetable varieties of beans for seedsmen. 



LOBSTER FISHING IN CHILE. 

In the opinion of the American Consul 
at Valparaiso, "the Island of Juan Fernan- 
dez, lying 600 miles West of Valparaiso, 
made famous by the story of Robinson 
Crusoe, promises soon to develop industrial 
interests; The island belongs to Chile, and 
that government is now arranging to make 
it a part of one of the Provinces and es- 
tablish a local civil government. The is- 
land is about 15 miles long and 8 miles in 
width. There is a good harbor on one side, 
where large ships can anchor with safety. 

"A large canning factory has been estab- 
lished in Juan Fernandez, and the fishing 
industries are attracting the attention of 
capitalists. There are quantities of lob- 
sters, crabs and excellent food fishes in the 
waters. The lobsters are large, of excel- 
lent flavor, and especially suited for can- 
ning. They are easily caught, the supply 
seems inexhaustible, and the cost of secur- 
ing them is nominal. There are also large 
numbers of fur seals on Fernandez and 
other islands near, the taking of which 
might be profitably added to the lobster 
and fish business. The laws of Chile per- 
mit the killing of seals from March 1 to 
November 1. There is a ready market for 
the seal skins in this port, whence they are 
shipped to Europe. 

"There is plenty of fresh water on the 
island ; land can be acquired by settlers 
without cost ; fruit and vegetables grow 
wild and are easily cultivated, which makes 
the cost of living comparatively low." 



"Let me sell you a letter opener," said the 
clerk in the novelty store. 

"Have one at home," responded the little 
man. 

"Indeed! What kind is it?" 

"My wife." — Chicago News. 



PUBLISHER'S NOTES. 



IMPROVEMENTS IN THE SYRACUSE. 

The new catalogue of the Syracuse Arms 
Company is now out and describes several 
changes in their guns. Among other things 
these people say : 

We have placed through the extension 
rib a double wedge fast bolt instead of the 
single one as heretofore. We have let the 
stock into the frame in such a manner as 
to prevent spreading or splitting. We have 
changed the models of our stock materially, 
and are informed by the trade generally 
that we now have the most shapely stock of 
any American gun made. We are placing 
a full pistol grip on our grade No. 3 with- 
out any extra charge. Heretofore we have 
been charging $2 list extra on this grade 
for full pistol grip. 

We are settled in our new factory and 
are in better shape than ever to take care of 
our rapidly increasing trade. Our trade so 
far this year has trebled that of last. We 
have made our new plant thoroughly up to 
date. 

The new automatic ejector that we are 
placing on our A and higher grades of 
guns, whereby the shooter is enabled to 
change from an .automatic ejector to a non- 
ejector instantly, and that without the use 
of tools, seems to have met and filled a 
long felt want. We give an option of 
Krupp steel barrels in connection with auto- 
matic ejector, on an $80 list gun, and are 
putting it sauge barrels on 16 gauge 
frames. 



The following are a few of the recent tes- 
timonials to the Life Saving Folding Can- 
vas Boat Company: 

Dear Sirs : 

I have tried the canvas boat, paddling 3 
miles up a winding salt creek against tide 
and an East wind. She behaved well, and 
under more favorable conditions would have 
made a much better showing. Am perfectly 
satisfied. Yours respectfully, 

F. M. Savery. 

With City Nat'l Bank, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Dear Sirs : 

I. received my boat and am much pleased 
with it. Yours truly, 

Jas. L. Gilfillan, Skowhegan, Me. 



Messrs. Schoverling, Daly & Gales, New 
York, write me that a customer of theirs 
wishes to sell a prosperous, well estab- 
lished sporting goods business in one of 
the most enterprising cities of Pennsyl- 
vania, with a population of 38,000 in the 



city and 75,000 in the county. Cash re- 
ceipts $11,000 to $17,000 per annum. Stock 
well selected and in first class order, cost 
$11,500. The business on the invoiced 
value of the stock, and nothing added for 
the good will. The reason for selling is 
that the owner has accepted a lucrative 
position which recpiiires all his time and at- 
tention. 



Don't forget to take a Wick Plug for 
your rifle or shot gun when you go for 
your hunting trip this fall. It will save 
you much time in the cleaning of your 
gun, and it may save you the price of the 
weapon. Any man who will buy a good 
gun and then run the risk of having it 
ruined by rust or pits is mighty foolish. 
Oiled Wick Plugs are absolute preven- 
tives of rust and pits. These plugs are 
made for the different calibers and gauges. 
W r rite the manufacturers, Hemm & Wood- 
ward, Sidney, Ohio, for circular, and please 
say you saw their ad in Recreation. 



• Of the many stock companies in existence 
during the past few years the last formed 
and newest, Proctor's Big Stock Company, 
is the only one remaining. During the 
coming season the company will even sur- 
pass in general excellence that of last. For 
each production or revival new scenery and 
electrical embellishments are constructed. 
Mr. Proctor gives the public a chance to see 
for 15 to 75 cents productions fully equal to 
the $2 performances given at other theatres. 



The Southern Railway offers superb ser- 
vice to Asheville, Hot Springs and Brevard, 
N. C. 

For descriptive literature on the Land of 
the Sky and the Sapphire Country address 
New York offices, 271 and 1185 Broadway. 
Alex. S. Thweatt, Eastern Passenger 
Agent. 



At Parkersburg, W. Va., the individual 
championship of West Virginia was won 
by Dr. E. E. Sample, of Huntington, W. 
Va., breaking 48 out oi : 50, shooting 40 
grains DuPont, 1^4 ounces y l /.> chilled shot, 
2^4 inch cases. 



"The Summer Boarder," containing a list 
of 3,000 summer hotels and boarding houses 
on or reached by the New York Central 
lines, sent on recept of a 2 cent stamp by 
G. H. Daniels, G. P, A., N-sw York, 



JSl 



EDITOR'S CORNER. 



A GREAT YEAR FOR GAME LAWS. 

Last winter was the most eventful in 
the history of the game protective move- 
ment in this country. More was accom- 
plished in the enactment of proper laws for 
the preservation of wild birds and animals 
than in any previous year in the history of 
the country. 

Montana, Idaho, Wyoming, Oregon, 
Minnesota, Illinois, Tennessee, Virginia 
and Texas have completely reconstructed 
their game laws. Some of these States 
have repealed existing statutes for the-pro- 
tection of game and of song birds, and 
have enacted complete new codes, from 
beginning to end, built on thoroughly mod- 
ern lines. 

New York has lined up with Vermont, 
New Hampshire, Ohio, Michigan, Wiscon- 
sin, Minnesota, Utah, Alaska, Manitoba, 
Ontario, New Brunswick and Newfound- 
land in prohibiting the spring shooting of 
wild fowl. 

Nebraska, Texas and Idaho have passed 
laws during the past winter prohibiting the 
killing of antelope at any time, thus leaving 
Wyoming and Washington the only States, 
having any antelope, in which these ani- 
mals may be legally killed. 

Arkansas has prohibited the sale of all 
kinds of game ; Illinois that of wild fowl ; 
Washington that of rail and plover, and of 
water fowl with certain reservations. New 
York has prohibited the ,sale of ruffed 
grouse and woodcock within the State. - 

Texas and Arkansas have cut off the 
export of wild fowl, and Indiana, Montana 
and Tennessee have established additional 
restrictions on the export of game. Hunt- 
ing licenses have been established or in- 
creased in Illinois, Indiana, Montana, Ten- 
nessee and New Hampshire, and Arkansas 
now denies non-residents the privilege of 
hunting there at any time. Several States 
have fixed a limit as to the number of 
birds or animals that may be killed in a 
day or in a season, while others have de- 
creased the numbers each man may be per- 
mitted to kill. 

The friends of game protection may 
therefore justly feel gratified with the re- 
sults of their work. The sweeping changes 
and improvements in the game laws are 
wholly due to the educational work car- 
ried on by the League of American Sports- 
men, the Audobon societies, the American 
Ornithologist's union and Recreation ; and 
the same great wave of public sentiment on 
behalf of the wild birds and animals, which 
has enabled us to secure the enactment of 
good laws in so many States, will greatly 
aid us in enforcing the laws. 



GAME BELONGS TO THE STATE. 

One Tom Marshall, of Keithsburg, 111., 
and 2 Powers brothers, of Decatur, 111., 
own a tract of marsh land at Crane lake, 
in that State, which is a natural resort of 
wild fowl in their migrations North and 
South. These 3 alleged sportsmen sent a 
man to their preserve last summer with in- 
structions to begin dumping corn and other 
grain about the blinds as soon as the ducks 
began to come in from the North. This 
order was carried out and the scheme suc- 
ceeded so well that the 3 mighty duck 
butchers went to the marsh the opening 
day of the season and bagged 800 ducks, 
shipped them home and then followed the 
plunder to brag about it. This unparal- 
leled act of slaughter aroused the ire of 
nearly every newspaper editor and every 
decent sportsman in Illinois. Then Mar- 
shall and the Powers brothers concluded 
they had made a mistake ; not, perhaps, in 
slaughtering all the birds they could reach 
while feeding on the grain, but in boasting 
of it. So Chauncey M. Powers wrote a 
long article to a Western sportsman's jour- 
nal, denying the charge of having killed 800 
birds, claiming that they had only killed 
500, and endeavoring to obviate the crime 
by saying they owned the land, that they had 
paid out a great deal of money for grain 
to bait it with, and so they had a right to 
kill the birds. This defense, however, does 
not stand. Migratory water fowl do not 
belong to the man on whose land they hap- 
pen to alight for rest or feed, even though 
the owner of the land may pay out $100 a 
day for corn to bait them with. The ducks 
belong to the people of the -State, and the 
man who kills more than his reasonable 
share of them is a robber. 

This brilliant piece of slaughter on the 
part of these 3 brutes has had a good ef 
feet on the people of the entire State of 
Illinois, and the result will probably be- 
that a law will be enacted by the Legisla- 
ture of that State in the near future, limit- 
ing the number of ducks which any one 
man may kill in a day to 25. The law 
should also provide a severe penalty for 
any man who shoots a wild fowl on or 
near any piece of land or water where feed 
has been placed to attract the birds. 



GOVERNOR ODELL CHANGES. 
Governor Odell has changed ins attitua 
materially on the subject of game protec- 
tion. This is probably because he heard 
something drop, last fall. As I have before 
stated, he was elected Governor of New 
York in 1898 by a majority of io8,000 and 



ifa 



RECREATION. 



*53 




We Could 

brew beer 

for Half 

our cost 

We could cut down 
half on materials. 

We could save what 
we spend on cleanliness. 

We could cease filter- 
ing our air. 

We could send out 
the beer without aging 
it for months — but the 
beer would then cause 
biliousness. 

We could save what 
it costs to sterilize every 
bottle — an expensive 
process. 

Yet You 

would pay 

the same 

Common beer — brewed 
without all our precau- 
tions — costs you no less 
than Schlitz Beer. 

When you can get a 
pure beer — a healthful 
beer- — at just the price 
of a poor beer, isn't it 
wise to ask for Schlitz ? 

Ask for the brewery bottling. 



154 



RECREATION. 



re-elected in 1902 by a majority of 12,000. 
The difference is largely due to the fact that 
he vetoed the bill, which passed the %Legis- 
lature in 1899, prohibiting the sale of 
ruffed grouse and woodcock; that he 
recommended the passage of a bill allowing 
the keeping of game in this State all 
through the year; and that he refused the 
League of American Sportsmen a hearing 
on that bill when it went before him for 
signature. 

During last fall's political campaign Gov- 
ernor Odell learned that the League of 
American Sportsmen is a power in the 
land, so he has approved our bill prohibit- 
ing the sale of ruffed grouse and wood- 
cock, which was again put through the 
Legislature. Not only this, but he sent a 
special message to the Assembly asking that 
body to pass Senator Brown's anti-spring 
duck shooting bill, which had previously 
passed the Senate. The Assembly passed 
this measure and the Governor promptly 
approved it. New York is now in line with 
a dozen other States of the Union which 
prohibit spring shooting of wild fowl. 

The Governor can completely square him- 
self with the sportsmen of this State by 
asking the next Legislature to repeal his 
nefarious cold storage bill ; and not until 
that measure is wiped off the statute books 
will New York sportsmen in general sup- 
port him for any public office. 



A certain magazine printed in this city 
and devoted to outdoor sports, amateur 
photography, etc., in fact, a would be imi- 
tator of Recreation, prints in its April 
issue a photograph which is labeled "Cow 
Moose, Millnocket Lake, Me." It shows 
dimly a bit of water and some driftwood in 
the foreground, and a wooded background. 
Just in front of the trees stand a poor, old, 
'weary looking, domestic cow with horns, 
looking as if she were sorry she had ever 
been born. Her bony frame bespeaks a 
long absence from good pasture, and one is 
prompted on looking at the picture to wish 
he could offer her a bale of hay as a birth- 
day present. 

The text states that the picture was made 
by J. H. Fisher, Jr., of Baltimore, and 
that it was awarded 3d prize in a photo 
competition. 

I know Mr. Fisher to be an honest, 
truthful man, and am sure he never at- 
tempted to palm off that picture on the 
editor of the aforesaid imitator as that of a 
cow moose. The alleged editor must have 
imagined that the cow moose ranging Mill- 
nocket lake have horns, high hip bones, 
sharp shoulder blades and ribs showing 
through ; hence that the animal shown in 
this picture must be a cow moose. It would 
he well for this editor to take a walk 
through some good museum before he at- 
tempts to further instruct his readers about 
wild animals. 



The Hon. H. S. Moran, member of the 
Texas Legislature from Parker county, is 
entitled to a great deal -of the credit for 



the enactment of the excellent game law 
which is now on the statute books of that 
State. He worked like a Trojan all 
through the session to secure the passage of 
this bill and was ably assisted by the Hon. 
Thomas Connally, of Marlin ; Judge Eng- 
lish, of Cameron ; Wm. Pierson, of Green- 
ville; J. R. Sanford, of Eagle Pass; L. S. 
Schluter, of Jefferson; H. B. Terrell, of 
West; and Seth P. Mills, of Waco. The 
sportsmen of the entire country are under 
deep obligations to these gentlemen for 
their untiring zeal in forcing this measure, 
and I am sure their efforts will be thor- 
oughly appreciated by all friends of game 
protection. 



Will Stewart E. White, who wrote me 
under date of March 23, regarding the 
slaughter of quails in Southern California, 
please send me his present address? 



PRAYER OF THE PREDACEOUS. 

Now this is the prayer of the Bull and Bear 
At the shrine of the God of Gold, 

Where the shadows cast by a Christian 
spire 

And the Westering sun's effulgent fire 
Down a narrow street unrolled : 

"O Lord of the Merger and Trust and Pool, 
Of Gammon and Greed and Sham! 
'Man can not live by bread alone,' 
So, give us our daily lamb. 

"We need his fleece to keep us warm, 
His fat when the nights are cool ; 

And, after all, he's an only child 
And twin brother to a fool. 

"We won't do a thing to the fresh young 
sheep 
But teach him to gambol and play; 
We'll feed him on only the best of 'shorts' 
And beautiful 'long' baled hay. 

"He shall not suffer the pangs of thirst; 
This woolly stray from the flock; 
For innocence we love and prize, 
And always water our stock. 

"The lion lies down with the lamb (inside), 
So why not the Bull and Bear? 
We'll show him 'cover,' we'll take him in, 
We've plenty of room to spare. 

"His mint sauce let him bring with him; 

'The long green' that's nice with game; 
And he shall join our Browning club 

Audi learn what is in a name. 

"Then, 'let us return to our mutton' : 
With current funds (which is jam) 
He shall have a plunge in our deepest pool, 
And come out a steel spring lamb. 

"O slightly Alloyed Auriferous God, 
Hear thy humble beasts who prey ! 

The Knights of the Golden Fleece are we, 
And we worship thee night and day." 
— W. E. P. French, in Life. 



RECREATION. 



155 



wfr^j&Aj/'j'jfsss**' 




HENRY B.HYDE 

FOUNDER 



•**Bfc 




I J.H.HYDE 

I VICE PRESIDENT 



J.W.ALEXANDER 

PRESIDENT 'J 

IN THE 

RACE 



of life there is no 
greater handicap than worry. 

An adequate Endowment 
policy in the Equitable will 
take from your life the two 
great causes of worry— anxiety 
about your own future- and 
about the future of your family. 



Vacancies in every 5tate for men or energy and character to act as representatives 

Appiy to CACEE.TARBELL 2K£ Vice President 



For full information fill out this coupon, or write 
THE EQUITABLE LIFE ASSURANCE SOCIETY of the United States. 

iao Broadway, New York Dept. No. 16 






Please send me information regarding an Endowment for $. 

if issued at years of age. 

Name 

Address 



1 56 



RECREATION. 



AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHY. 

"For sport the lens is better than the gun." 

I wish to make this department of the utmost 
use to amateurs. I shall, therefore, be glad to 
answer any questions and to print any items sent 
me by practical amateurs relating to their experi- 
ence in photography. 



8th ANNUAL COMPETITION. 
Recreation has conducted 7 amateur 
photographic competitions, all of which 
have been eminently successful. The 8th 
opened April 1st, 1903, and will close No- 
vember 30th, I903. 

Following is a list of prizes to be 
awarded: 

First 7 prize: A Long Focus Korona Camera, 
5x7, made' by the Gundlach Optical Co., Roch- 
ester, N. Y., fitted with a Turner-Reich Anastig- 
mat Lens, and listed at $85. 

Second prize: A No. 3 Folding Pocket Kodak, 
made by the Eastman Kodak Co., Rochester, N. 
Y., fitted with a Bausch & Lomb Lens, Plastig- 
mat Unicum Shutter, and listed at $61.50. 

Third prize: A Royal Anastigmat Lena, 4 x 5, 
made by the Rochester Lens Co., Rochester, -N. 
Y.; listed at $36. 

Fourth prize A Waterproof Wall Tent, 12 x 16, 
made by Abercrombie & Fitch, New York, and 
listed at $32. 

Fifth prize: An Al- Vista-Panoramic Camera, 
made by the Multiscope and Film Co., Burlington, 
Wis., and listed at $30. 

Sixth prize: A No. 3 Focusing Weno Hawk- 
eye Camera, made by the Blair Camera Co., 
Rochester, N. Y., and listed at $27.50. 

Seventh prize: A high grade Fishing Reel, 
made by W. H. Talbot, Nevada, Mo., and listed 
at $20. 

Eighth prize: A Tourist Hawkeye Camera, 
4x5, and made by the Blair Camera Co., Roches- 
ter, N. Y., and listed at $15. 

Ninth prize: A Bristol Steel Fishing Rod, made 
by the Horton Mfg. Co., Bristol, Conn., and 
listed at $8. 

Tenth prize: A pair of High ' Grade Skates, 
made by Barney & Berry, Springfield, Mass., and 
listed at $6. 

The 10 next, best pictures will each be awarded 
one dozen 8 x 10 Carbutt Plates, made by the 
Carbutt Dry Plate Co., Wayne Junction, Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 

The 10 next best pictures will each be awarded 
one dozen 5x7 Carbutt Plates. 

The 10 next best pictures will each be awarded 
one dozen 4x5 Carbutt Plates. 

A special prize : A Goerz Binocular Field Glass, 
listed at $74.25, will be given for the best picture 
of a live wild animal. 

Subjects are limited to wild animals, 
birds, fishes, ■ camp scenes, and to figures 
or groups of persons, or animals, Repre- 
senting in a truthful manner shooting, fish- 
ing, amateur photography, bicycling, sail- 
ing or other form of outdoor or indoor 
sport or recreation. Awards to be made 
by 3 judges, none of whom shall be com- 
petitors. 

Conditions: Contestants must submit 2 
mounted prints, either silver, bromide, 
platinum or carbon, of each subject, which, 
as well as the negative, shall become the 
property of Recreation. Negatives not to 
be sent unless called for. 

In submitting pictures, please write sim- 
ply your full name and address on the back 



of each, and number such prints as you 
may send, 1, 2, 3, etc. Then in a letter ad- 
dressed Photographic Editor, Recreation, 
say, for instance: 

No. 1 is entitled . 

Made with a camera. 



lens. 



On a 

Printed on 

Length of exposure, 



plate, 
paper. 



Then add any further information yud 
may deem of interest to the judges, or to. 
other amateur photographers. Same as to 
Nos. 2, 3, etc. 

This is necessary in order to save post- 
age. In all cases where more than the 
name and address of the sender and serial 
number of picture are written on the back 
of prints I am required to pay letter post- 
age here. I have paid as high an $2.50 on 
a single package of a dozen pictures, in ad- 
dition to that prepaid by the sender, on ac- 
count of too much writing, on the prints. 

Any number of subjects may be sub- 
mitted. 

Pictures that may have been published 
elsewhere, or that may have been entered 
in any other competition, not available. No 
entry fee charged. 

Don't let people who pose for you look 
at the camera. Occupy them in some other 
way. Many otherwise fine pictures have 
failed to win in the former competitions 
because the makers did not heed this warn- 
ing. 



PASSE-PARTOUT FRAMING. 

R. S. KAUFMAN. 

Passe-partout mounting of photographs, 
or any kind of pictures, is becoming more 
popular every day. This was shown at the 
exhibitions last winter. Passe-partout af- 
fords a cheap yet artistic means of protect- 
ing photographic work, as well as the many 
good illustrations found in the magazines 
of today. These can not be displayed to 
advantage without framing, and expensive 
frames often detract from the simplicity of 
the subject, whereas passe-partout merely 
adds to the simplicity. 

In one sense, passe-partout is not a frame. 
It is simply a print mounted in the regular 
way, on any shade of mount, with a glass 
cover, and the whole held together by an 
edge binding, of linen or tough, pebbled 
paper. With the great number of shades 
of mounting papers now on the market, 
there is no end to the variety of tones and 
combinations to be obtained, to harmonize 
with the tone of the print to be framed. 
This simple method of framing will sur- 
prise and charm those who have not seen 
pictures thus mounted. A description of 
the process gives but a faint idea of the 
beautiful effects that may be obtained. 

The best way to handle passe-partouts 



AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHY. 



W 



is first to trim the print and mount it as 
desired. The size of the mount is impor- 
tant. Few pictures look well framed close, 
ZVa x 4/4 an d 4 x 5 least of all. Ample 
margin often helps a picture, particularly 
if a hroad and comprehensive view is con- 
tained in a small print. A wide margin 
conveys the idea of greater area. The 
douhle mounting now in vogue is particu- 
larly desirable for photographs, and what- 
ever the tone of the print may be, a harmo- 
nious mounting can easily be made. A 
good method is to place a print on a suit- 
ably tinted mount, allowing a margin of Y* 
the width of the print. If the double 
mounting is preferred, use thin cover pa- 
pers. Place the print face down on a clean 
piece of paper and apply a thick paste all 
around the edge. Then place the print on 
the mount and roll down. Trim the mount, 
allowing a margin of say y 2 to $/% of an 
inch, and then mount on another shade, 
bearing in mind the harmonious combina- 
tion of the whole. The blacks and many 
shades of gray are well adapted to the black 
toned prints of the platinum and developing 
paper varieties. Sepia prints are, of course, 
in harmony with the many shades of brown. 
As most of the mounting papers are thin, 
even with several thicknesses of mounting 
they must be mounted on a heavier board 
for a proper support. 

After the print is properly mounted, se- 
cure a clean piece of glass, free from bub- 
bles and other defects, and a piece of heavy 
cardboard. The glass and cardboard must 
be exactly the same size as the picture. In 
the cardboard make 2 small slits, or holes, 
and insert through them 2 small brass 
hangers, having flat ends like paper fasten- 
ers. These hangers can be bought for the 
purpose. 

The binding of the 3 parts is next in 
order. Buy the ready prepared passe-par- 
tout binding, which can be procured in 
white, black, brown, green and red. The 
white, black and brown are always desir- 
able ; yet if none of these colors suits it is 
easy to use the white and tint it with water 
colors, as taste may dictate. The binding 
comes in rolls about 15 feet long and nearly 
an inch wide. Cut 2 strips the length of 
the plate, and allow one inch for each end 
to extend around the back. Two strips, al- 
lowing the extra length, are also required 
for the width. As the binding is already 
gummed, moisten it and apply it to the glass 
side of the picture, being careful that the 
binding laps evenly over the edge of the 
glass. It should lap about % inch on 4 x 5, 
5x7 and 6 x / 2 x 8^ sizes, while on larger 
sizes it is better to lap *4 inch. Do not 
attempt to mitre the corners, but allow the 
binding to run to the end of the glass and 
around to the back. Paste the other strip 
running in the same direction. Then apply 



the strips to the top and bottom in the same 
manner, the last 2 crossing at right angles 
the first 2. 

After the binding has been placed in the 
right position on the glass, run the forefin- 
ger around the whole, to make the 
binding adhere firmly to the glass, and at 
the same time form a clean, sharp edge. 
The edges, where lapped over, should next 
receive attention. Turn the whole over on 
the table and rub the binding firmly down 
on the back. Treat the 4 sides in this man- 
ner, and trim off neatly any projecting ends 
at the corners. 

If you frame your prints in this way your 
friends will appreciate your work more, and 
occasionally a sale of one's pretty bits is a 
result. Last but not least, your pictures 
serve the purpose for which they were in- 
tended, decoration. Q 



PLATE AND DEVELOPER. 
I use an Eastman plate camera, No. 4, 
with rapid rectilinear lens, 4x5. My 

work is chiefly landscapes, groups and 
other outdoor photography. What is the 
best brand of popular plates that give black 
and white negatives? What is the best de- 
veloper for them? What speed is the best? 
I prefer fast plates. What is the best hypo 
for them ? I use solio paper and solio toner 
and have lately had poor results with 
them. It has sometimes taken hours for 
them to tone to the desired color. When 
I first used them they • worked well. I 
now use Smith's toner with solio paper 
and it gives good results. Is it a good 
brand and will solio paper toned with 
Smith's toner remain permanent for years? 
How can gloss prints be mounted so they 
will appear the same as when taken from 
the ferrotype plate, and remain so? 

I wait for a dear friend when I wait for 
Recreation. 
Arthur E. S. Roth, Prairie du Chien, Wis. 

ANSWER. 

For the best results, use Carbutt plates 
or, if you wish superior results, use me- 
dium iso. They give the finest color values. 
Black and white negatives are under the 
control of the developer. Hydrochinone is 
noted for its contrast, metol for detail, and 
a combination of both work well on any 
plate. Pyrogallic acid developer is the best 
for any plate. Use plain hypo, made fresh, 
with the addition of a little alum. This 
may deposit on the film and must be 
swabbed off with a tuft of absorbent cotton 
before setting film aside to dry. The rea- 
son you do not get as good results with 
Solio as c. A first is that your toner is proba- 
bly exhausted or too cold. Smith's toner, 
if a combined one, containing all the chemi- 
cals in one solution, will not make perma- 
nent prints on any paper. No combined 
toner will. Prints should be printed a little 



158 



RECREATION. 



darker than wanted, washed in clean 1 water, 
handling over and over, changing the wa- 
ter when it becomes milky in color, and 
then toned in a bath of one grain of chlor- 
ide of gold to 32 ounces of water. Make 
bath alkaline with 3 grains of bicarbonate 
of soda. Make this bath one hour before 
use. Tone to desired shade, but leave a lit- 
tle red in the shadows, as the prints dry 
darker. When toned place in one ounce of 
salt to one gallon of water. Then wash in 
fresh water several times and fix in fresh 
hypo, one ounce to 12 ounces of water. 

Prints when taken from ferrotype plate 
should be placed face down on a clean 
surface, brushed with good paste without 
allowing print to shift in the least, then 
placed on card, covered with a clean blot- 
ter and rolled. This will allow them to 
dry without the loss of gloss. — Editor. 



INDOOR PORTRAITS. 

I am much interested in your amateur 
photography department, though I have 
only been taking pictures the last 4 months. 
I am living in a car on an Iowa railroad. 
It has 3 8x10 windows on the North and 
3 on the South. I want to get pictures of 
the members of my family. If I take them 
outdoors they squint, and if I take them in 
the car their eyes do not show plainly. 
Can you tell me why? 

What kind of printing out paper do you 
consider the best? I have tried Aristo 
self toning and Aristo platino, but have had 
no success at all. I like Solio and Velox 
the best of any I have tried. 

Mrs. W. H. Stukey,. Carroll, la., 



In taking portraits indoors there are 
a number of difficulties to overcome, due 
in the majority of cases to the lack of space 
and to poor light. Place the subject about 
4 feet from the window, toward the center 
of the room, and 2 feet from the window 
in the back. Have the chair slightly 
turned and facing the light. Place the 
camera on the side the window is on and 
as near the wall as possible. All the light 
available is thus thrown on subject. 

Take portraits out of doors on the North 
side of the building, facing the North, cam- 
era pointing South, and take care that the 
sun does not shine into the lens. Any 
shady spot will do, but you can not take 
snapshots in such light. Give a short ex- 
posure and develop with a fresh developer 
diluted with water. Do not hold the cam- 
era when taking time exposr "3. Do not 
get too close to the subject with a fixed fo- 
cus camera; 12 to 15 feet is about right. 
Solio or any printing out paper toned in a 
combined bath will -fade. Try cyco.— Edi- 
tor. 



SNAP SHOTS. 
A series of experiments in regard to 
washing negatives has been made by Herr 
Gaedicke. He finds that if the alum bath 
is used the hypo is much more difficult to 
get rid of, and several hours' washing is 
necessary, whereas half an hour is suffi- 
cient under ordinary circumstances. He 
recommends the use of a saturated solution 
of common salt in place of alum, if there 
is any tendency to frilling, which does not 
overharden the film, and does away with 
prolonged washing after fixation. 

There is no reducer for oromides better 
than 15 minims of a saturated solution of 
iodine in alcohol, and 20 minims of satu- 
rated solution of potassium cyanide in 
water, diluted with half an ounce, or less, 
of water. For clearing a slight veil, dilute 
with an ounce of water, and immerse the 
print. 

Wooden dishes may be made water-tight 
with the following preparation : 

Common brown resin y 2 pound 

Beeswax 2 ounces 

Melt together in tin pan ; when fluid, run 
solution rapidly all over where required. 
Wood must be perfectly dry and warm. 



I have been taking Recreation for some 
years past, and especially enjoy reading the 
articles in the photographic department. I 
have a suggestion to offer other amateur 
photographers. After reading Recreation 
I lift the ends of the binders with a knife 
and remove the pages on photography ; then 
send the magazine to someone out in the 
back woods, that I have hunted or fished 
with. They enjoy reading the hunting sto- 
ries, etc., but sometimes are not interested 
in photography. These pages I keep for fu- 
ture reference, and mark on the margin the 
month and year of the number from which 
they are taken. I find they come handy at 
times in hunting up formulas. I bind them 
together with a binder that I buy at a 
bookstore. 

O. C. Hillard, Wilkes Barre, Pa. 



A quick drying and easily removed back- 
ing for plates is made as follows : Put a 
cake of Newcomb's backing in an old tum- 
bler or cup. Mix a solution of alcohol 4 
parts, glacial acetic acid one part. Pour 
sufficient of this solution over the backing 
to coat the desired number of plates. Apply 
with a brush. The cup can then be set 
aside until wanted again, when more solu- 
tion can be poured in and so on until it is 
used up. The backing can be wiped off 
with a damp cloth. 

R. ,L. Wadhams, M. D., 
Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 



RECREATION. 



159 




'CI 

mm 



^ wk 

ut$rlrk 



4aw 










The Pack 
aa\d the Pictvire — 

A Very Simple Matter. 

Amateur photographers have received the new PREMO Film Pack with almost extrav- 
agant praises. It meets the conditions of the outdoor picture maker as nothing else 
has ever done. Whether you use a PREMO Plate Camera or a PREMO Film Camera, 
it opens the easy way to photography; — a working outfit that is unequalled for sim- 
plicity and convenience. 

The PREMO Film Pack 

DAYLIGHT LOADING 

As flat as a handkerchief in your pocket when not in use, as easy to load in daylight as 
shutting a book ; it is unequalled for effectiveness. Carrying twelve non-curling, ortho- 
chromatic films ; successive exposures are made by pulling out the numbered black 
paper tabs. The last tab seals the package light tight. Adapted to 3% x A% and 4x5 
Cameras, the PREMO Film Pack meets successfully every photographic condition. 
See it at your dealer's or write for particulars contained iri the Premo Year Book, free. 

ROCHESTER OPTICAL CO., DepL 209, Rochester, N. Y. 





l6o 



RECREATION. 



OBJECTS WELL CENTERED AND CORRECTLY FOCUSED 



The Focusing Weno 

awK= 





ye 

has the advantage 

over all cameras 

of a ground glass the size of picture, which works automatically and allows focusing 
when using film. The result is obvious — perfection of work — satisfaction to the user. 

No. 3 Focusing Weno HawK=Eye, with B. & I,. Automatic Shutter, 

and £xtra Rapid Rectilinear Lens. Pictures 3% x 4%, c = =$27.50 

No. 4 Focusing Weno HawK=Eye, same equipment. Pictures 4x5, 30.00 

Hawk-Eye Film can be developed in the Kodak Developing Machine. 
wnte /or Ha-wk-Eye Bookut. BLAIR CAMERA Co., Rochester, N. Y. 



Do you want 

A Folding Canvas Boat ? 

IF SO, SEND ME 

35 yearly subscriptions 

to RECREATION 

AND I WILL SEND YOU 

A 14 ft. King folding canvas 

boat listed at $48 

capable of carrying 2 men 
and an ordinary camp outfit. 
There are thousands of these 
boats in use, and nearly ev- 
ery man who is using one of 
them praises it on every oc- 
casion. 

Sample copies of Recrea- 
tion for use' in canvassing 
will be furnished on applica- 
tion. 

Address 23 W« 34th §K N? Y« 



The Best Yet: — To any person sending 
me $2, express or money order, for one 
year's subscription to Recreation, I will 
give free, one fine 3 joint bamboo rod, 7 to 
9 feet long, one nickel plated 60 yard 
multiplying reel, and 50 yards of water- 
proof silk line. This outfit, including 
Recreation, would cost $6. Or I will 
give the above outfit for 7 yearly sub- 
scriptions to Recreation. Or I will give 
the 50 yards of silk line, listed at $1, for 
one subscription and 25 cents extra. This 
line is a very fine outfit and would retail 
in any store at $1. 
C W. Jacobs, 339 N. 2nd St., Coshocton, O. 



Something Special — Playing Cards 
Free: — To each person sending me $1 for 
one year's subscription to Recreation, or 
sending it direct to be placed to my credit, 
I will forward, all charges prepaid, a pack 
of elegant gold edge playing cards. These 
are no cheap second quality cards but first 
quality, of extra selected stock, highly 
enameled and polished, fancy set pattern 
backs, each pack wrapped in handsome 
glazed wrapper and packed in strong tele- 
scope case. 

L. J. Tooley, 

141 Burr Oak St., Kalamazoo, Mich. 



Recreation is the best all around maga- 
zine in the country. 

jtti L Crayons. Fitt§bwrg ? Fa* x 



RECREATION, 



161 



SPOTTING OUT. 

The question often arises at what stage 
it is best to put hand work into a photo- 
graph to take out spots or blemishes, or 
to modify its tones or details. The larger 
alterations, of course, must depend on the 
circumstances in each case, but for the 
mere spotting, definite rules can be laid 
down. 

Pinholes may first be noted. The question 
whether or not they need to be removed 
must depend on their situation. If they are 
in the sky or in the high light of the pict- 
ure, they may be so conspicuous as to be 
objectionable; but in the half tones or 
shadows they are certain not to be noticed, 
and should be left alone. In the former 
case, use a fine camel's hair brush and a 
little India ink. The ink must be fairly 
thick and black, but only the merest trace 
of it should be on the point of the brush, 
which should then be lightly touched on 
the pinholes. They should at once disap- 
pear. Deal in exactly the same way with 
larger clear spots, except that they are sure 
to need it, while pinholes, even when con- 
spicuous on the negative, may often be left 
untouched. In like manner, scratches must 
be gone over. In each case the ink should 
be of sufficient strength for the spotting to 
show up quite white on the print. 

Black spots need nothing at this stage. 
After working up the negative as directed 
all its defects show up as white spots 01 
marks on the print, A white mark on the 
print can always be touched up with color 
so that it will match the tint of the parts 
around it; but a black spot on a print, such 
as is caused by clear glass on the negative, 
is a more difficult matter. 

The final spotting has to be carried out, 
therefore, on the print itself. This is 
where many fail, yet when once the method 
has been grasped the whole thing is sur- 
prisingly easy. With glossy, burnished 
prints, it should be done after mounting 
and before burnishing. With prints dried 
on ferrotype or glass, it must be done after 
they leave that support. In this case a little 
gum mixed with the color will be found 
helpful. A great many of the spots will be 
found unnoticeable on the print if this has 
a matt or rough surface. Platinotype and 
carbon prints are especially easy to spot, 
using in the former case ivory black water 
color and in the latter a pigment made by 
dissolving a little unexposed tissue in 
warm water. The secret of success is to 
use the pigment weak and the brush almost 
dry, so that it only makes a faint mark on 
a sheet of white paper, except, of course, 
when the spots to be removed appear in the 
deep shadows. — Photography. 



Sons of rich men all remind us 
Not to leave our sons a dime, 

Lest the sparks we leave behind us 
Burn our Rioney and |;heir time. 

—Exchange. 




All of the dark-room fuss 
and bother is removed from 
photography by the 

Kodak 

way of picture making. Better 
results than the old way too. 

Anybody can make good pic- 
tures, now that the Kodak 
Developing Machine has abol- 
ished the Dark-Room. 

KODAKS, $5.00 to $75.00. 
BROWNIES, $1.00 and $2.00. 

KODAK 

DEVELOPING MACHINES, 

$2.00 to $10.00. 

EASTMAN KODAK CO. 

ROCHESTER, N. Y„ 
Catalogue, free at the dealer's or by mail. 



l62 



RECREATION. 







Tjf f*<JniV.' 



-»*%.— 



.ley*'*-. .. 



^ 







AKES everything within half a circle, making a picture five inches high by twelve 
inches long ; or you can stop the revolving lens at different points and mase expos- 
ures either four inches long, or six inches, or ten, depending upon how much you 
want to get in the picture* No wasted film* The revolving lens moves at dif- 
ferent speeds, so you can gauge your exposure accurately* The exposure of the film is on the 
same principle as the focal plane shutter for pictures of moving objects* Our catalogue tells of 
Its many uses — free. 

MULTISCOPE & FILM CO., 136 Jefferson St., Burlington, Wis. 



RECREATION. 





CAMERA 




THE HEIGHT OF ART 

in camera work 

Perfection in photography, has been 
secured by the use of the Al-Vista 
Camera. It produces the entire pan- 
oramic view — from the limit of 
vision on the left to the extreme 
point on the right. The Al-Vista 
Camera is compact: easy to use, sure 
in action. It is sold on its merits: 
we demonstrate this by selling you 
one 

on easy payments 

Ask us for a catalog: select the 
camera you wish, fill up the blank 
we shall send you, and references be- 
ing satisfactory we will at once send 
you a camera — pay weekly or month- 
ly in sums to suit your purse. The 
camera is no longer a luxury: the 
demands of modern progress make a 
good camera a necessity; we make it 
easy for you to get the best, an 

Al-Vista. 

15he 

Multiscope & Film Co. 

136 Jefferson St. 

Burlington, Wis,, U. S. A. 



RECREATION. 



■ 'dill M* * 
.*jjf«*— -""Sty:::::; 




: 
Jljijijiiiii;:;::::: : :::: ; : 


:!;iij\ sin SI 




■I 


1 ^Tai^? > <*Mi: •■-;- : -: :: T yflfeUPr°''i(H 


UH # 


■ 









VE,LOX 

Liquid Developer 

Made especially for Velox by the Velox 

people — it makes Velox better than ever- 

and that is saying a great deal. 



Four-ounce bottle Concentrated Solution, 25 cents. 



ALL DEALERS. 



LOOK FOR 




THE LABEL. 



NEPERA DIVISION, 

EASTMAN KODAK CO. 

Rochester, N. Y. 



RECREATION. 



xvn 




" In your Catalogue I notice you 
mention very often 'Century Quality.' 
I would like to state that I have found 
the excellent qualities of the Century 
Camera to be all you claim. 

I have two Cameras besides the 
Century, but i would not exchange 
my Century for a dozen like the 
othertwo,and either one of the others 
cost as much as the Century." — Extract 
from a Recent Purchaser 's Letter. 



44 



>* 



THE SUPERIORITY OF 

Century 

Cameras 



Has won for them the highest praise from photographers everywhere. 



COMPARE Centurys with other Cameras, 
COMPARE the general design, 
COMPARE the workmanship, 
COMPARE optical and mechanical features, 
COMPARE the ease of manipulation, 
COMPARE our many exclusive adjustments, 
COMPARE results. 



Comparison makes the 
favorable comments regard- 
ing " Century Quality " 

still more numerous and 
emphatic. 

Our new Catalogue de- 
scribes Century Cameras in 
all styles, all sizes, at all 
prices. Ask your dealer 
for a copy or write the 
makers, 



Century Camera Co., Rochester, N. Y. 



o 



xvm 



RECREATION. 



From each dozen sheets 
of ROTOX developing 
photo paper you can 
surely obtain twelve per- 
fect prints. It prints from 
negatives too thin for other 
papers; iseasierto manip- 
ulate and has a range of 
latitude that is unequaled. 

PLATINUM BLACKS * 

Prices, per dozen, thick or 
thin, rough or smooth : 4x5, 
15 cents; 5x7, 30 cents; 
b%jR%, 55 cents; 8x10, 
70 cents. 

" ROTO GRAPH," the best bromide paper, same prices. 

Sample copy of the Photo Critic, containing, every 
month, articles on " The A to Z of Photography. * 
Of interest to amateur and professional, sent FREE. 

Subscription, $1.00 per pear. Write 

R0T0GRAPH, Dept. V, 101 5th Ave., New York City 



Do you want a Good, Reliable, 
Substantial, Well Made 

Single Barrel Slot Gi 

If so, send me 

JO YEARLY SUBSCRIPTIONS 

and I will send you such a 
Gun as a premium 

It is made by the DA VENPORT ARMS 
CO., and this means it is made of good 
material and that only good workmanship 
is put on it. 

This is one of the many remarkable op- 
portunities RECREATION is offering to 
men and boys to fit themselves out com- 
pletely for shooting and fishing. 

Sample Copies for Use In Canvassing 
Furnished on Application. 

Address 

RECREATION 

23 W. 24th St„ NewJYork City 



Something JVebv! 




PRESTO! CHANGE! 

Attachable Eyeglass Temples 

Every wearer of eyeglasses wishes occasionally that they 
were spectacles. Spectacles stay on, however violent one's 
exercise, however warm or stormy the weather. This little 
device can be readily attached or detached without injury to 
the lenses, thus in a second giving you the choice or either 
spectacle or eyeglass. Just the thing for outdoor sports. 
The Temple Attachment will fit any of your eyeglasses and 
can be carried in the same case with them. 

Send thickness of lens when ordering by mail. 

Price in Nickel, 50 cents a pair 

Price in Gilt, 75 cents sv, pair. 
Send for Circular. 

Our illustrated catalogue can be had /or the asking 
We carry everything in the Optical and Photographic line 
Eyeglasses, Spectacles, Cameras, Opera, Field or Marine 
Glasses, Thermometers. Barometers, Telescopes, Hygrom- 
ers, Sun-dials, etc. 

GALL «, LEMBKE, Department C. 
1 W. 42d Street 21 Union Sq„ New York 

Establishad 1842. 



OIL PORTRAITS ON APPROVAL. 

If you will send me a photo of your- 
self or a friend and state color of hair, 
eyes and complexion I will paint and 
send you on approval a miniature oil 
or pastel portrait. 



Canvas 6x8 or 8xio inches, 
Canvas 10x12 or 12x14 inches, 



; 10.00 
515.00 

Z. EMMONS, 58 West J04th St., New York. 

Reference : Mr. G. O. Shields. 

"Margaret, I think you cheapen yourself 
by going so much to the theater with Mr. 
Jones." 

"No, mother; on the contrary, I'm mak- 
ing myself very dear." — Harvard Lampoon. 

LANTERN SLIDES COLORED 

SKILLFULLY AND ARTISTICALLY 

FOR 

Lecturers, Teachers and others 



I refer by permission to the Editor of Recreation. 



MRS. C. B. SMITH 
303 W, 110th street, New York City 



RECREATION. 



xix 



ORELIANCEO 
• SHAMROCK f 

Have you picked the Winner? Then you'll want to 
see her win. We can help you, — with the peerless 

TURNER-REICH 

BINOCULAR 

When you pick your Winner among BINOCULARS, place your 
RELIANCE on the TURNER-REICH; it's no SHAM. . . . 



ITS ALL 
l IN THE 



w 



Write for Price List 



GUNDLACH-MANHATTAN OPTICAL CO. 
730 So. Clinton Ave., Rochester, N. Y. 







Size of yachts as seen with 
the unaided eye. 



Field of the bulky old style 
8-power Binocular 



As seen with the 8-power 
Turner-Reich Binocular 




KX 



RECREATION. 



GIVE THEM MARLINS. 

JEAN ALLISON. 

Sunday,- December 8, 1901, Ralph D., a 
Verde river rancher, and I made arrange- 
ments to put in the few remaining days of 
the open season for deer on the Mogollon 
mountains. Monday, the 9th, we left his 
place in a spring wagon and drove as near 
to the rim as possible. From there we had 
to pack, and at 8 o'clock we landed on top 
of Secret mountain. The old Howard cabin 
was in a bad state of repair and the water 
in the tanks was low, so our prospects 
were flattering for a dry camp. Tuesday 
we looked for water and fresh deer signs, 
but found little of either. We concluded to 
move camp, and the following morning 
found us early on our way to Kelsey 
springs, on Sycamore creek, 12 miles 
Northwest. At noon we were on the Mali- 
pai rim, overlooking Sycamore creek and 
the noted Kelsey, or Black and Vail's. D. 
K, ranch. Down the rough and slippery 
trail we went, and were glad when we 
reached the bottom and were on the little 
flat where the house, corral and long string 
of 12 water troughs are situated. 

We unpacked, watered our horses 
and hobbled them, found the key to the 
cabin, made ourselves comfortable, and soon 
had supper. By 8 o'clock we were dream- 
ing of bucks with horns like rocking chairs 
and of the choice, juicy steaks and liver 
we were to enjoy. 

By daylight Thursday we were wending 
our way over a frozen trail to Kastney 
mountain, about 2 miles distant. We had 
just crossed a little park and were round- 
ing a rocky point when a jack rabbit jump- 
ed up, ran probably 40 feet and stopped. 
My companion wanted to shoot it. but I 
said no. We had not gone 20 steps when 
I spied a 3 point blacktail buck standing 
behind a fallen pine. Up went my 45-90 
and down came the noble deer. After a 
number of hard trials we succeeded in 
hanging him high and dry. Cutting off his 
right ear as a trophy and tying up the liver 
we started for camp to get a pack horse 
to bring in our prize. When we reached 
from Maine, in a lumber camp near Wil- 
liams. They were camped on the rim, ^2 
mile distant, and were down after water. 
They told us one member of their party 
had the misfortune to have his right hand 
torn off by the explosion of a 30-30 Marlin 
the week before. 

When they had gone we looked for our 
horses and at sundown we cut their trail. 
They were heading up the slippery trail we 
came down the day before. The next 
morning we were out early and struck our 
horses' trail on top. We followed it a 
mile or so and then lost it. We made an- 
other circuit and Ralph jumped a spike buck 
and killed it. We hung the liver and heart 
on a twig and decided to go back that wav 
to take them in for supper. After a futile 
search for many hours we gave up the 
horse hunt for the day and started for 



home. When we came to our spike we 
found liver and heart gone and the tracks 
Of 3 men and a dog. We grew suspicious 
from our loss and decided to pack our deer 
into camp. Saturday we devoted strictlv 
to horse hunting. As we were nearing 
camp we decided to go to the place where 
we had packed our buck and lost the liver, 
to see if anything new had developed. Be- 
neath the little oak on the black, soft 
ground were shod horse tracks and the 3 
tracks of the liver thieves. Knowing our 
horses were lost they had thought we 
would leave the deer until we found them 
and that they would appropriate our spike. 
The loss of the liver to us was the loss of 
the deer to them. When we arrived in 
camp the party had gone,. 

Sunday morning, as we were rounding a 
cedar knoll, we ran on to a 4 year old bay 
mare, a 3-year old stallion and a 2-year old 
sorrel filly, all shot with 30-30 and 30-40 
Winchesters, as we found the empty shells 
of those calibers. The chills ran over us 
at the sight and we recalled having heard 
13 shots in that neighborhood Friday even- 
ing. 

We located our horses on a far away 
point and by 11 o'clock were back in camp. 
Throwing a pack saddle on one of the 
horses we were soon on our way to the 
little knoll where our 3 point prize buck 
was hanging. When we reached there all 
that remained to tell the tale of the buck 
was the gambol stick, the blood-stained 
grass and an X, afterward put on the tree. 

Brother hunters, think of the loss of the 
hot, juicy steaks we dreamed of. and do 
not blame me for registering a- vow that if 
I learn the names of those thieves thev will 
want no creme de menthe after I get 
through advertising them. The best way 
to get rid of such hunters would be to 
present each of them with a Paddy Marlin 
rifle and they could blow their bloomin' 
heads off. Then our bucks would hang 
where killed. 



In speaking on the negro question the 
other night, Oscar R. Hundley, for many 
years a member of the Alabama Legisla- 
ture, told a story to illustrate the workings 
of certain politicians. "I was out walking 
one spring," he said, "and saw sitting on 
the bank of a creek, fishing, an old, wizened 
negro and an uneasy little pickaninny. • I 
watched them, until finally the little fellow 
wriggled off his log, going to the bottom 
of the creek. The old negro tossed off his 
coat, and, diving, grabbed the child, and 
drew him out. I said to him, 'Uncle, that 
was surely a magnanimous act; you must 
think a lot of the boy.' 

" 'Oh, no ! mistah, you don't know 'Ras- 
tus. He's jes' the ornaries', triflines', 
shif'less little cuss that evah was; but he 
had all the bait in his pocket.' " — New York 
Tribune. 



IF YOU WOULD LIVE NEXT TO 
NATURE, READ RECREATION. 



RECREATION. 



/FAHRENHEIT 



W •■ . . ■■•,£ 



/ r*\ 



iSUMR 



1 HEAT 



TEMPE 



RATE 



iFREEZ! , 



I-U--H 



O' 



ri 2ER01 



' • 4i 






When It's Hot 

you can keep cool by regulating your diet. 
This for breakfast and luncheon : 

FRUIT 

A SAUCER OF CRAPE-NUTS, with Cream 

EGGS, Soft Boiled or Poached 

POSTUM FOOD COFFEE, Iced if you like 

ZWEIBACH or TOASTED BREAD 

Wonderful how much cooler and clearer and snappier 
you'll feel, full of energy and go, while your meat fed 
neighbor may be stupid, covered with prickly heat, and 
cross as a bear. 

Let up on the meats, go slow on the rich desserts and 
eat no fats or greasy foods at all during hot weather. 
Put your frying pan away. Sip a little cold water 
when thirsty. The Grape-Nuts will nourish and sus- 
tain you through the day and keep the blood healthy 
and normal. In the evening after the heat of the day 
is past eat your heartiest meal, but be moderate and 
select it with an eye to health. 

In this simple and pleasant way you can feed right and 
feel right and think right. You will be cooler, stronger, 
healthier and more vigorous mentally and physically. 
Easily proved by trial. 

Grape-Nuts 



XX11 



RECREATION. 




Densmore Typewriter 
Company 

309 Broadway New York 

WANT A REEL? 

You can get one for nothing. 

Or at least for a few hours' -work. 

Send me 

15 Yearly Subscriptions 

RECREATION 

and I will send you 

A TALBOT REEL 

Listed at $20.00 

Hade by W. H. Talbot, Nevada, Ho. 

This is one of the finest pieces of fishing 
tackle ever made. It is built like a gold 
watch. Equal to any Kentucky reel you 
ever saw. 

In Tournaments, Always a Victor 
Among the Angler's Treasures, Always the Chief 

I have but a few of these reels in stock 
and this offer will be withdrawn as soon as 
the present supply is exhausted. 

Sample copies of Recreation for use in canvassing 
furnished on application. 



Sent on Approval 

TO RESPONSIBLE PEOPLE 

Laughlin 

Fountain Pen 



Guaranteed Finest 

Grade 14k. 



SOLID GOLD PEN. 

To test the merits of 



RECREATION MB 



pJGH t a 
pUNTAlN/ 

lifrE*]!" 



$1.00 



as an advertising medium §p 
we make this grand spe- mi 
cial offer, your choice of SB 



These 
Two 

Popular ' 
Styles 
For Only 



iiiniii 






Postpaid 

to any 

Address 

(By Registered mail 8 cents extra) 

Holder is made of finest 
quality hard rubber, in four 
simple parts, fitted with 
very highest grade, large 
size 14k, geld pen, any flex- 
ibility desired — in feeding 
device perfect. 

Either Style— RICHLY 
GOLD flOUNTED for pre- 
sentation purposes, $1.00 
extra. 

Grand Special 
Offer 

You may try the pen a 
week ; if you do not find it 
as represented, fully as 
fine a value as you can 
secure for three times the 
price in any other makes, i 
if not satisfactory in every 
respect, return it and we 
will promptly refund your 
money. 

; Illustration on left is full 
size of Ladies' style; on 
right, Gentlemen's style. 
Lay this RECREATION Down 
and Write NOW. 

Safety Pocket Pen Hold-! 
er Sent free of charge with | 
^ach Pen. 

address : 



Laugh 1 in flfg. Co. 

424 Griswold St., DETROIT, MICH. 



RECREATION. 



xxm 




During the past five years, thousands of former* 
sufferers have through Orangeine found 

Immunity and Relief 

which they could not find at any Hay Fever resort. 
TRIAL POWDERS FREE. 

Orangeine Powders are sold by all progressive 
druggists, 25c. (6 powders) ; 50c (15 powders); $1 (35 
powders), Write us for sample, full information, 
composition, and far-reaching human results. 
Address "ORANGEINE, CHICAGO" 



Orangeine 

FOR HUMANITY 

Corrects "Bad Feeling"- -Prevents Sickness— Off- 
sets "Wear and Tear." 

Quicfity dispels {even chronic cases of) 

Hay Fever, Colds, Dyspepsia, 

Headache, Asthma, Indigestion 

Stomach Upsets, Blues, Neuralgia, 

and a host of common ills 

EVERY MAIL IS LIKE THIS 

Rev. F, W. Hamilton, Roxbury Station, Boston, Mass., writes: 
"Orangeine has become a household necessity. I am never without 
it. Thanks to its moderate, regular use, I have just passed through 
a prolonged period of labor and nervous strain, not only without 
undue fatigue, but feeling better after than before the experience.'* 

Mr. J. J. Cone, Canon City, Colo., writes: "After ten weeks of 
facia] neuralgia, I took two Orangeine powders per diem, in % cup 
of hot water. I am cured. Chronic asthma, which I have had for 
years, has been relieved, and at 68 I am in better health than 
for years." 

Mrs. L. C. Bragdon, Lockport, N. Y., writes: "Orangeine is a 
God-send to poor working women. When over tired, I take an 
Orangeine powder, and feel revived in ten minutes." 

"NO MOKE HEADACHE." 

Mrs. K. Odell, New City, N. Y., writes: "I enclose $1.00 for 
Orangeine. I would not be without it for worlds. When I was a 
little girl, I was overcome by heat (sun-stroke) and have suffered 
with headache, and never found anything to help me, until I found 
Orangeine. I can truthfully say, I have never felt so well in my 
life as since taking it. NO MORE HEADACHE. 

PpHVOn ■ The intelligent, timely use of Orangeine 
*■ ^f ypi * " secures good health and immunity from 
common and seasonable ailments. 



REAL BABY TALK. 

I am a baby, n months old, and nearly 
worn out already. Please let me alone. 

I am not a prodigy, except to the extent 
that, not having anything to say, I don't 
talk. Two big persons claim to be my 
parents. Why can't they let it go at that? 
I have never denied the charge. I haven't 
much data to go by, but I don't think I 
am either a magician, a learned pig or a 
virtuoso. I don't hanker for applause ; so 
it will be an appreciated favor if you won't 
put me through any parlor tricks. 

If I have my wealthy old Uncle Ezra's 
nose, congratulate Uncle Ezra; but don't 
blame me. I may be a kleptomaniac for all 
I know, but I can't help it. 

Don't rattle rattles at me ; they rattle me. 
Don't goo-goo and ootsie-kootsie at me. I 
can't understand it any better than I can 
the English language. 

The pain I have is not in my stomach, 
but in my neck. l t don't want to be enter- 
tained or mystified or medicated or ap- 
plauded ; and if you don't want me to 
grow up to be a hypochrondriac, a stamp 
collector, an awful example, a ping pong 
enthusiast, or a misanthrope, you just lemme 
be! — Smart Set. 



IF YOU WOULD LIVE NEXT TO 
NATURE, READ RECREATION. 



e®#$#9$*@$®$#$$# 




Her Marvelous 



2 Qrowth of Hair. 

• FREE TO ALL,, a trial package of a new and 
wonderful remedy mailed free to convince people it 
• actually grows hair, stops hair falling out, removes 
dandruff, and quickly restores luxuriant growth to 
shining scalps, eyebrows and eyelashes. Send your 
A name and address to the Altenheim Medical Dispen- i 
-!i" sary 8103 Foso Building, Cincinnati, Ohio, for a free ^0 

• trial package, enclosing a 2-cent stamp to cover ^k 
postage. Write to-day. ^0' 



XXIV 



RECREATION. 



■< 



PIANO 

They inol 
rell knowi 

FROM 



Do Toy Want • 
Genuine Bargain 

Hundred! of Upright Piano* 
returned from renting to b* 
disposed of at once. They include Steinwajrs, Kn»bes, Fiiehera, 
Sterlings and other well known makes. Many cannot be dis- 
tinguished from new sjsjsj ps» M^ fA B| ye* *U » r « offered at 
a great discount. I \Jk I ■ M|fl Uprights as low 

m $100. Also beau- ■■ B*S ■ ; I |S| *'f»' New Up- 
rights at $125,1135, S | I U |f f flSOand $165. A fin« 
instrument at $290, fully equal to many 

9400 pianos. Monthly payments aeeepted. Freight only about 
$5. Write for list and particulars. Tou make a great saving. 
Pianos warranted as represented. Illustrated Piano Book Pre*. 

LYON & HEALY 

3 9 Adams 8t.t CHICAGO. 

tufcl'i tMffjtt BKfM kousti •*!!§ ItorjtbiBg known In M flfjfe 



ON YOUR OUTING THIS SUMMER 
YOU WILL NEED A 

Fork 



Duplex: 




for handling- hot potatoes, ears of corn, boiled eggs, 
and other hot food, and you will find it indispensable 
for use with pickles, fish and meats that an ordinary 
fork will break. The forks are always open and ready 
for use, and with a slight pressure on the handle any- 
thing can be easily taken hold of without fear of break- 

in &- Postpaid, 23 Cents 

E. A. LYFORD, 3090 Gilbert Ave., Cincinnati, O. 

Mention Recreation. 



PAROID 
ROOFING 

"IT LASTS" 

Prevents leaky roofs 
and makes a satisfied 
owner. Contains no 
tar. Easy to apply 
with kit in each roll. 
Write for sample. 

Mention Recreation 

F. W. BIRD & SON 

MAKERS 

East Walpole, Mass., U.S.A. 
New York Chicago 



Those who mix their own developer 
should put no bromide in the stock solution 
during cold weather. Snow pictures made 
with bromide in the developer often are 
chalky, lacking any semblance of half tone 
in the snow ; if snapshots, they are almost 
sure to have this defect. Restraining can 
be effected easily by the proportions used 
of each component of the developer, or, if 
it comes to the worst, a tray of weak bro- 
mide solution can be used to dip a plate in 
if it is running away from over exposure, 
rinsing the plate of bromide before return- 
ing to the developer. 

For fixing, the use of 2 successive hypo 
baths can be confidently recommended. 
The first clears the coloring matter of the 
developer from the negative and becomes 
rapidly discolored. It should, therefore, 
be frequently renewed. The second bath 
need not be so frequently changed. For 
ordinary amateur work a dish holding one 
negative may be used for bath No. 1, and 
one holding 2 or 4 for bath No. 2. 

A good pasting tool is made by enclosing 
a tuft of cotton wool inside a piece of wash 
leather, the edges of which are gathered 
together, and tied with a string to form a han- 
dle. The contrivance will spread thick starch 
paste evenly and smoothly. For large work 
it will be found particularly useful, as thick 
paste is more adhesive than thin, and the 
print on which it is spread is easier to 
handle. 

A glossy blue printing paper may -be 
made by sensitizing carbon single transfer 
paper in the following solution mixed in 
equal quantities : 

Potassium ferricyanide 1 ounce 

Water 4 ounces 

Iron ammonia citrate 1 ounce 

Water 4 ounces 

To remove the film from a cracked nega- 
tive, immerse the negative in : 

Hydrofluoric acid 2 drams 

Glycerine 1 dram 

Alcohol 25 drams 

Water 25 drams 

As soon as the film begins to lift at the 
corners help it off with a camel hair brush, 
and transfer to a fresh piece of glass coated 
with gelatine. Then dry. 

The slipping of tripod legs may be en- 
tirely prevented by replacing the spikes 
with india-rubber shod walking stick fer- 
rules, which can be obtained at most um- 
brella shops. 

Do not dip the fingers in the solution 
until diluted with water after film floats 
off. The operation must be performed with 
care and a clear conscience. — Photo-Ameri- 
can. 

A developing dish may be improvised by 
flooding the bottom of a plate box, the size 
required, with melted beeswax. 

A highly glazed surface is obtained by 
drying finished prints on a ferrotype plate, 
as with ordinary p.o.p. 



RECREATION, 



XXV 



FFCC! Hunters, Sportsmen, Fl*£g| 

________ Campers Out, Etc. Etc. —_---— 

Fairly bristles with facts and information from start to finish. 
A complete up to-date volume, entirely covering the subject of 
•« Camping Out and Outfits.'* 

A Book of 136 Paiges 

Pronounced by the very best 

authorities the most practical 

work ever published on the 

subject. — A Hand some volume. 



Glitters with Pictvires 
from Cover to Cover 

136 PAGES. In aJl 
over 200 IllvistreUions 

Bound in Linen, 5 Col- 
or Covers 

Size, 6y£ x 4^ inches 
FREE! 




Brimfull of brainy 
facts exhaustively cover- 
ing every subject from A 
to Z, interesting and of 
instructive value and ser- 
vice to every sportsman 
and camper out, old or 
young. We have thou- 
sands of letters from all 
over the World (some 
from noted sportsmen), 
who congratulated us upon these books. Contains a thousand facts 
of value never before put in print, and there is scarcely a campaigner 
anywhere, no matter how old or experienced he may be, who cannot 
learn something from these books. They are better than some books 
sold at $ 1. 00 a copy, or your money refunded. 
1st edition of 50,000 copies nearly exhausted. 
They are Free to You on receipt of 10c, coin or stamps to 
cover cost of mailing them to you. Address 

"B\IZZa_COtt" Dept. A 
COMPLETE CAMP OUTFITTER 

Racine Junction, Wis. or Chicago, 111., V. S. A. 

Mention Recreation. 



If yovi be wise write a».t 
once for this book; 
It'll svirprise you 



XXVI 



RECREATION. 



HAY FEVER 

VANQUISHED 

THE WILSON HAY FEVER DISKS 

placed in the nasal passages give 
absolute protection against dust and 
pollen without impairing respiration. 
Invisible and perfectly comfortable. 

After wearing it a few minutes the hay feverite experi- 
ences the wonderful relief felt on an ocean voyage or in 
an "exempt" region. Price $1.50 per pair prepaid. 
B®= Money refunded if not satisfactory. =®a 
SEND FOR BOOKLET 
with statements of leading medical journals, physicians, 
officers of hay fever associations, and hosts of relieved 
sufferers. WILSON HAY FEVER DISK CO. 
41 STATE ST.. ROOM 61 CHICAGO, ILL, 




ENNEN'S 



BORATED 
TALCUM 




KPWDER 



PRICKLY HEAT, 
CHAFING, and 
SUNBURN, ^& L s £E UCTK,r * 

"A little higher in price, perhaps, than worthless substi* 
stitutes, but a reason for it." Removes all odor of perspi- 
ration. Delightful after Shaving. Sold everywhere, or mailed 
on receipt of 25c. Get Mennen's (the original). Sample Free- 
GERHARD MENNEN CO., Newark, N. J. 



EXTRAORDINARY OFFER. 

TO any person sending me $i for a year's 
subscription to Recreation, I will give free 
one of the following books: 6th and 7th 
Books of Moses. This is a great book. 
Every home should have one. Volumes 
I.-IL, bound together in one volume; reg- 
ular price is $1. 'The Almighty Dollar" is 
a new book just published, and is worth 
its weight in gold to any one. Can not be 
obtained for less than $1 anywhere. 

"Hunter's Guide and Trapper's Compan- 
ion." This is a book every hunter and 
trapper should have. Descriptions of these 
books will be sent for a stamp. This is the 
greatest offer ever made, and you should 
not let this pass. Old subscribers may avail 
of Hhis offer by sending 10 cents extra. 
Address Henry Nelson, Eckwoll, Minn* 




Tooth Soap 

the Inlefnationoi'Dentifrice 



Beautifies the teeth, hard- 
ens the gums, sweetens the 
breath. Preserves as well 
as beautifies the teeth, 
es in neat, handy metal 
boxes. No powder to 
scatter, no. liquid to 
or to stain gar- 
ments. 

25 Cents 
At all Druggists. 




C. II. STRONG & CO., Proprietors, 
Chicago, U. S. A. 



THEY REFUSE TO IMPROVE. 

Whenever I return to civilization, after 
an absence of some duration in the wilder- 
ness, the first break I make is for the book 
store to get Recreation, and where I'm 
known, they generally have it laid aside 
for me. No publication has a greater at- 
traction for me or pleases me more. I am 
a rifle and revolver crank and firmly be- 
lieve in following the ethics of true sports- 
manship in whatever branch of sport I en- 
gage in. 

Here we frequently see large numbers 
of men, women and boys on the streets, 
loaded down with ducks, which they sell 
at 5 cents each, or less than 2 cents Ameri- 
can money. Surely the wild hog, indigen- 
ous to this country, is entitled to more 
consideration at the hands of sportsmen 
than his human brother is. 

And now a word about the Marlin Co. 
They make a good rifle in some respects, 
but its extractor is decidedly faulty and 
unreliable, after a little use, and no one 
who hunts big game can afford to take 
chances on a rifle's clogging at a critical 
moment. I recently had an experience of 
that kind, on the Isthmus of Tehuantepec, 
when I was charged by some wild cattle, 
and while I escaped with no greater dam- 
age than some torn clothing and a bruised 
hip, I had such a close call it makes me 
shiver to think of it. 

Why the Marlin people don't remed)' 
this defect in their guns I can not compre- 
hend, for certainly they have had their at- 
tention called to it often enough. 
% I have a friend in Kansas City who is 
[one of the best and most skilful amateur 
mechanics I have ever known. He is a 
gun crank and so situated that he can de- 
vote all the time he wishes to indulging 
his hobby. His den is filled with ingenious 
appliances for sporting purposes, all of his 
own handiwork. 

While visiting him several months ago, 
he took down his Marlin rifle and, taking 
out the breech bolt, showed me a new ex- 
tractor, simple and strong, made of one 
piece, which he had fitted into the slotted 
groove which formerly held the combina- 
tion affair made at the factory. His extrac- 
tor worked as smoothly and easily as could 
be expected of one strong enough to grip 
the head without slipping off when a. shell 
happens to swell in the chamber. The Mar- 
lins know this man personally, and they 
take special pains in executing any order 
he may place with them for anything in the 
gun line; so he sent them the breech bolt, 
with his extractor fitted in for inspection, 
and generously offered them his idea, free, 
if they wished to embody the improvement 
in the construction of their rifles. But, no ; 
they returned it and declined to make use 
of it. 

What in the name of heaven is the cause 
of such perverseness? To me it is inex- 
plicable. 

^ Tehanmoc, Mexico City, Mex*; 



RECREATION. 



xxvi i 



A Prescription 

for all 

m. JT^m^ 1 1 1 




A prescription that 

for 6o years has been alleviating 

the sufferings of mankind as nothing else 

can. That has withstood all tests; conquered all 

imitators; overcome all substitutes. Pond's Extract 

is a prescription THAT CURES — stops all pain and starts the 

healing instantly. It does it with an efficacy no other remedy in 

the world possesses. There is nothing like it. It CURES because it 

contains the pure extract of the most valuable anodyne (pain relief) 

known in materia medica. 

If You Want a Cure 
That's Sate and Sure 

you want Pond's Extract — it CURES. Don't expect a substitute to 
cure. Water WON'T cure. That's why ordinary witch hazel is so cheap — 
ifs nearly all water — that's why it WON'T cure. 

For burns, scalds, wounds, inflammation, rheumatism, neuralgia; 
for cuts, bruises, lameness, soreness, strains, sprains, sunburn, 
chafing, insect bites and stings, irritation after shaving, get Pond's 
Extract. It fe the pure extract of Hamamelis Virginica y com- 
bined with other pain relieving ingredients — that's why 



I T CURES 



Sold only In sealed bottles, 
enclosed in bufC wrappers 



XXV111 



RECREATION. 




STIMULATION 



WITHOUT 



IRRITATION 



Will Make Hair Grow 

Evans Vacuum Ca»p 

This appliance will massage the scalp and force a free 
and healthful circulation. It will stop hair from falling out 
and restore a normal growth where live follicles exist. It 
is used about ten minutes twice a day. Price of outfit, 
complete, is $35.00. Money refunded in full if not satisfac- 
tory after 30 days' use. 

A traveling man writes under date of June 6th from the 
Essex Hotel, Boston : 

Gentlemen : — I purchased one of your Caps a few months 
ago and as I am certainly well pleased -with the results I am 
getting I "wish to recommend your method of treatment. 

My hair has been falling out over fifteen years, during 
•which time I had tried practically every supposed remedy with 
absolutely no results, {except injurious), but thanks to the 
' " stimulation "without irritation " method the fuzz on my head 
is developing into hair. 

A fac-simile of above letter bearing name and address, 
together with other convincing letters, will be sent on appli- 
cation to any one interested. 



EVANS VACUUM CAP CO. 

ST. LOUIS OFFICE N. Y. OFFICE 

Fullerton Bldg. Room 12, 1300 Brdwy 




Comfort and Convenience for either 

a short or long stay in Boston 

Beautifully located near Back Bay 

Stat' >n 

RATES ON A "LI CATION 



HOW OLD SPORT STOPPED THE GAME HOG'S LITTLE GAME, 




Ah ! A good day and a fine bag. Now I must get this stuff home somehow. 



RECREATION. 



DIAMOND/ 

ON CREDIT 



IF YOU are interested in Diamonds, you will want a copy of our NEW SUMMER 
CATALOGUE, for it shows the latest creations in artistic Diamond mountings, fine 
jewelry and watches. These new and fine goods you will not find illustrated in the 
catalogues of other houses until next fall, for we are the only house in the Diamond and 
ewelry business which issues a complete catalogue between seasons. Everything illus- 
trated is quoted at exceptionally low prices and sold on the POPULAR LOrTIS SYS- 
TEM of easy payments. Select any article that you like and it will be delivered at your 
door with all express charges paid. Only one-fifth of the price need be paid at first ; the 
balance being arranged in a series of small monthly payments extending over eight 
months. No security is required; no interest is charged and no publicity is 
created when you buy on our CONFIDENTIAL CHARGE ACCOUNT SYS- 
TEM, s. If you make a selection it will be upon the distinct understanding that 
your money will be promptly returned in case you decide not to purchase. We 
are the largest concern in the business and sell only the finest genuine goods, 
and at prices ranging from ten to twenty per cent below those of other houses. 
Every Diamond is sold under a written guarantee of quality and value and 
may be exchanged at any time in the future for other goods or a larger stone 
at the full original price. Our Confidential Credit System is open to all 
honest persons without regard to their financial worth ; but if you prefer to buy 
for spot cash we make the most startling and liberal offer ever made. It is no 
less than guaranteeing the return of all money paid at any time within one year 
— less ten per cent, the reasonable cost of doing business. We are 
one of the oldest houses in the trade (Est. 1858). We refer to any 
bank in America — for instance, ask your local banker to consult his 
Dun or Bradstreet book of commercial ratings and he will tell you 
that we stand at the top in credit, reliability and promptness. We 
have a number of attractive booklets that we will be glad to send 
you if you write promptly for our New Summer Catalogue. 

LOFTIS BROS. <a CO. 

Diamond Importers and Manufacturing Jewelers & 

Dept. H-82, 92 to 98 State St. rKirao'n ¥11 -^r 

Opposite Marshall Field & Company VII M.K*GLf£SJf A J A* <^fo 








This old trunk's the very thing, and a few coats on top will put the warden 
off the scent. 



XXX 



RECREATION. 




Varicocele 
Hydrocele 



Cured to Stay Cured in 5 Days* 
No Gutting or Pain? Guaranteed 
Gure or Money Refunded,, 

uwm DMg%f%f*grt JT Under my treatment this insidi- 
V/lnfvvvCUf ous disease rapidly disappears. 
Pain ceases almost instantly. The stagnant blood is driven 
from the dilated veins and all soreness and swelling sub- 
sides. Kvery indication of Varicocele vanishes and in its 
stead comes the pleasure of perfect health. Many ailments 
are reflex, originating from other diseases. For instance, 
innumerable blood and nervous diseases result from poison- 
ous taints in the system. Varicocele and Hydrocele, if neg- 
lected will undermine physical strength, depress the mental 
„.„,£, ,,, /'H 1 . , ' \}' n \t s « faculties, derange the nervous system, and ultimately pro- 

The Master Specialist of Chicago, who Cures Varicocele, duce. complicated results. In treating diseases of men I 
Hydrocele, and treats patients personally. always cure the effect as well as the cause. I desire that 

Established 1880. every person afflicted with these or allied diseases write me 

(Copyrighted) so j can explain my method of cure, which is safe and per- 

manent. My consultation will cost you nothing, and my charges for a perfect cure will be reasonable and 
not more than you will be willing to pay for the benefits conferred. 

fiof^Jirfl/v tvf Curt* is wnat y° u want. I give a legal guaranty to cure or refund your money. 
***** •*■■** »Jr %mm %01MM fc? "what I have done for others I can do for you. I can cure you at home 

Correspondence Confidential. g^^^^^^S^*^ 

dition fully, and you will receive in plain envelope a scientific and honest opinion of your case, Free of 
charge. My home treatment is successful. My books and lectures mailed free upon application. 

H. J.TILLOTSON, M.D.,140 Tillotson Bldg,84 Dearborn St., CHICAGO 



4 




How easy! Won't the boys laugh when I tell them. 



RECREATION. 



XXXI 



in 




TRISCUIT is unexcelled as a 
food for children, because it con- 
tains all the elements of Whole 
Wheat, which go to properly nour- 
ish the whole body. Wheat con- 
tains the properties to make bone, 
teeth, muscle, in fact every part 
of the body. 

TRISCUIT 

is 

NATURE'S FOOD 

BY 

NATURE'S PROCESS 




WITH CHEESE OR FRUIT PRESERVE 




TRISCUIT, the 

highest achievement 

known to the science 

of food production, 

is made possible by 

that other great 

achievement, the ap- as a bread or toast 

plication of electricity; for Triscult „;„.„„„- „- . „♦. 

! . , , . , ' ' . ^ . ., TRISCUIT is a neat compact 

is made and baked by electricity. , , „, . , L . , 

form of filamented wheat, its shape 

and size making it convenient to 
be carried wherever you may go, 
and to be used at any time. 
Triscuit is an all-day food for 
everybody, and contains the prop- 
erties for sound teeth, perfect di- 
gestion, and an entirely healthy 
Composed of the whole wheat body m accor d with Nature's 
berry, God's perfect gift to man. j 

Not touched by human hands 
during the process of manufacture. Triscuit can be used as a Bread, 
Cleaned, filamented, formed and Toast, Wafer or Cracker. Delicious 
baked by electricity. with Cheese, Fruit, Preserves, etc. 

Placing: Triscuit in warming: oven a 
a few moments will renew crispness. 

SEND FOR DESCRIPTIVE BOOKLET (FREE.) 

The Natural Food Company, 

Niagara Falls, N. Y. 




WITH COCOA OR OTHER DRINK 




What struck Old Sport ? There must be something in that trunk beside clothes. 



XXX11 



RECREATION. 






FREE OF 
f COST 






SOME RARE OPPORTUNITIES 

These goods are all new, and will be shipped 
direct from factory. Prices named are those at 
which manufacturers and dealers usually sell. 
Here is a good chance to get 

A Book, a Gun, a Camera 
A Sleeping Bag, a Fishing Rod 
A Reel, a Tent, 

Subscriptions need not all be sent at once. They 
may be sent in installments as taken and credit will 
be given on account. "When the required number 
is obtained the premium earned will be shipped. 

These Offers are subject to change 
without notice. 

TO ANY PERSON SENDING ME 

TWO yearly subscriptions to Recreation 
at $i each, I will send a copy of Hunt- 
ing in the Great West, cloth ; or a Zar 
Camera, listed at $i; or an Ingersoll Watch 
or Cyclometer, listed at $i; or a Recreation 
Waterproof Match Box, made by W. L. 
Marble and listed at $.1; or a Shakespeare 
Revolution Bait listed at 75 cents; or a 
Laughlin Fountain Pen ; or a dozen Trout 
Flies, assorted, listed at $1 ; or a pair of At- 
tachable Eyeglass Temples, goldUplated, 
made by Gall & Lembke; or one Rifle Wick 
Plug, made by Hemm & Woodward, Sidney, 
Ohio, 30 caliber to 50 caliber, or Shotgun 
Wick Plug, 20 gauge up to 10 gauge. 

THREE subscriptions at $1 each, a safety 
pocket ax, made by W. L. Marble and 
listed at $2.50 ; or a dozen Bass Flies, 
assorted, listed at $2 ; or a pair of chrome 
tanned horsehide hunting and driving gloves, 
listed at $1.50, made by J. P. Luther Glove 
Co. ; or a pair of Shotgun Wick Plugs made 
by Hemm & Woodward, Sidney, Ohio, 20 
gauge to 10 gauge. 

FOUR subscriptions at $1 each, an Ideal Hunt- 
ing Knife, made by W. L. Marble and 
listed at $2.50 ; or a .32 caliber Automatic 
Forehand Revolver, made by the Hopkins 
& Allen Arms Co. ; or a No. 822 Rifle 
made by the Hopkins & Allen Arms Co., 
listed at $4.50. 

FIVE subscriptions at $1 each, a copy of Cruis- 
ings in the Cascades, cloth ; or a set of Neh- 
ring's Convertible Ampliscopes, listed at 
$5.00; or an Ideal Hunting Knife made by 
W. L. Marble, and listed at $3 ; or a polished 
Buffalo Horn Gun Rack, made by E.W. Stiles ; 
or a Forehand Gun, made by the Hopkins & 
Allen Arms Co. , listed at $6 ; or a pair of lock 
lever skates, made by Barney & Berry, 
listed at $4,50; or a pair of gauntlets, for 
hunting and driving, ladies' size, listed at 
$2.50, made by J. P. Luther Glove Co., or a 
J C Hand trap made by the Mitchell Mfg. 
Co., listed at $4. 

SIX subscriptions at $1 each, a Haw key e Re- 
frigerating Basket made by the Burlington 
Basket Co., or one dozen Eureka golf balls 
listed at $4; or a Forehand Gun made by 
the Hopkins & Allen Arms Co., listed at $9. ; 
or a Pocket Poco B 3X x 4/^» made by the 
Rochester Optical- & Camera Co. listed at $9. 

SEVEN subscriptions at $1 each, a copy of 
The Big Game of North America, or of The 
A merican Book of the Dog, cloth, or one set 
Lakewood golf clubs, 5 in number, listing at $5 ; 
or a series nBor nDKoron a Camera, made 
by the Gundlach Optical Co., listed at $10. 

EIGHT subscriptions at $1 each, a 4 x 5 
Weno Hawk-Eye Camera, made by the 



Blair Camera Co. , and listed at $8. ; or a 
series 1, 4x5, Korona Camera, made by the 
Gundlach Optical Co., listed at$i2. ; or a 
pair of horsehide Hunting shoes, made by T. 
H. Guthrie, Newark, N. J., and listed at $8. 
NINE subscriptions at $1 each, an Acme 
single shot gun, made by the Davenport 
Arms Co., and listed at $8. 

TEN subscriptions at $1 each, a Cut- 
Glass Salad Bowl, made by Higgins & 
Seiter, and listed at $4.50; or aViwman 
& Erbe Automatic Reel, listed at $6 to $9; 
or a Bristol Steel Fishing Rod, listed at $6, 
or less; or a Waterproof Wall Tent 7x7, 
made by Abercrombie & Fitch, and listed 
at $8. ; or a pair of horsehide Hunting Boots, 
made by T. H. Guthrie, Newark, N, J., and 
listed at $10 ; or a Rough Rider rifle telescope, 
made by The Malcolm Rifle Sight Mfg. Co., 
and listed at $12. 

TWELVE subscriptions at $1 each, aPeabody 
Carbine valued at $12 ; or a Davenport Eject- 
or Gun, listed at $10., or a Cycle Poco N0.3, 
4x5, made by the Rochester Optical and 
Camera Co., listed at $15 ; or an 8 ft. folding 
canvas boat, made by the Life Saving Canvas 
Boat Co., listed at $29. 

FIFTEEN subscriptions at$i each, a Shakes- 
peare Reel, Silver Plated, listed at $15; or a 
set of rabbit plates made by Higgins & Seiter, 
and listed at $8, or a Field Glass made by 
Gall & Lembke; or a Kenwood Sleeping Bag, 
complete, with canvas cover, listed at $16; 
or a Bulls-Eye rifle telescope, made by The 
Malcolm Rifle Sight Mfg. Co. , and listed at $16 ; 
or a Pneumatic Camp Mattress, with pillow 
listed at $18; or a 10 ft. special canvas boat, 
made by the Life Saving Canvas Boat Co., 
and listed at $35. 

TWENTY subscriptions at $1 each, a 14-karat 
Gold Hunting-case Watch, with Waltham 
Movement, listed at $20; or an Elita single 
shot gun, made by the DavenportArms Co., 
and listed at $18. , or an Acme Foldin g Canvas 
Boat, No. 1, Grade, A listed at $27;or aMul- 
lins Duck Boat, listed at $20; or a Shattuck 
double hammerless shot gun listed at $25. 

TWENTY-FIVE subscriptions at $1 each, 
an 11-footKing Folding Canvas Boat, listed 
at $38; or a 4x5 Planatic lens, made by the 
Rochester Lens Co. , and listed at $25 ; or a 
Syracuse Grade OO, double hammerless Gun, 
made by the Syracuse Arms Co., and listed 
at $30. 

THIRTY subscriptions at $ 1 each, aWaterproof 
Tent, \\Yz x 17, made by Abercrombie & 
Fitch, and listed at $25 ;or an Ithaca, quality 
No. 1, plain, double barrel, hammerless 
breech loading shot gun, listed at" $40. ; or a 
Field Glass, made by C. P. Goerz. 

THIRTY-FIVE subscriptions at $1 each, a 14- 
foot King Folding Canvas boat, listed at $48. 

FORTY subscriptions at $1 each, a Savage 
.303 Repeating Rifle; or a No. 10 Gun Cab- 
inet, made by the West End Furniture Co., 
and listed at $32. 

FORTY-FIVE subscriptions at $1 each, a Royal 
Anastigmat Lens, 4x5, series I, made by 
Rochester Lens Co., and listed at $45. 

FIFTY subscriptions at $1 each, a No. 20 
Gun Cabinet, made by the West End 
Furniture Co., and listed at $38. 

TWO HUNDRED subscriptions at $1 each, a 
strictly first class upright piano, listed at $750. 

Address, Recreation &™ e Y s orl 4th st ' 



RECREATION. 



XXXlll 




IN CAMP 

Experience teaches that the success of a 
vacation in the woods depends fully as 
much upon a careful choice of food and 
drink as upon congenial companions. 

Sewar's Scotch 
Whisky 



i ♦ 



Special" anfc "mhitclabel" 

has helped to kindle good fellowship round 
many a well-remembered camp-fire. Be 
sure to include it in your supplies this year. 



THIS CAMPING PICTURE 

"IN CAMP" (copyright, 1903, by Frederick 
Glassup) is an original drawing by Ray Brown. 
It is printed in four colors on heavy plate paper, 
9 x 12, without advertisement of any kind. Sent 
to any address on receipt of 10 cents in silver. 
Suitable for framing in club-house or home. 
Next month, a yachting picture by the famous 
marine artist, Carlton T. Chapman. 

FREDERICK GLASSUP 

Sole Agent for John Dewar &• Sons, Ltd. 

126 Bleecker Street, New York 




We couldn't think of letting such a great hunter leave us this way. We'll go 
and talk it over with the judge. 



XXXIV 



RECREATION, 



Entrancing. The ED IS Or 

PHONOGRAPH 



R3- *« & 



,... ■■" 



Don't judge the Phonograph by what 
you have heard— the imitations or the 
old styles— but call at the nearest 
dealer's and hear the Phonograph with 
Mr. Edison's recent improvements. 

5000 DEALERS SELL PHONOGRAPHS 

NATIONAL PHONOGRAPH CO.. Orange. N.J. 

NEW YORK CHICAGO SAN FRANCISCO EUROPE: ANTWERP, BELGIUM 

'83 Chambers St. 304 Wabash Ave, 933 Market St. 82 Rempart Saint Georges 



Free: If you send your subscription to 
Recreation through me or direct to the 
office to be placed to my credit, I will send 
you free of charge, any one of the articles 
mentioned below: 

Shot gun bench crimper, sells for 75 cents, 
in 10-12-16-20 gauge. 

Shot gun cleaning rod, three attachments, 
sells for 50 cents, in 10-12-16 gauge. 

Micrometer powder and shot measure, 
adjustable, and for both black and smoke- 
less powder, sells for 65 cents. 

U. S. Government rifle cleaner, any cal- 
iber, with attachments, sells for 60 cents, 
packed in neat canvas bag. 

A duck, snipe or turkey call, sells for 75 
cents each, best made. 

A hand painted sporting picture, suitable 
for framing and just the thing for your den, 
worth $1.50. 

" Hunting in the Great West," by G. O, 
Shields. H. S. Hill, 815-uth Street. 
N. E., Washington, D. C. 



Here is Another! 

If you will send me 

30 Yearly Subscriptions 

RECREATION 

I will send you 

A No* JO GoerzTrieder- 
Binocular Field Glass 

Listed at $38.00 

Every well-informed man knows the great 
power of this modern prismatic field glass. 
It is indispensable to every hunter, and is 
one of the latest and best on the market. 

I have but a few of these instruments on 
hand and the offer will be withdrawn as 
soon as the supply is exhausted. There- 
fore, if you want one 

START IMMEDIATELY. 

Sample copies of Recreation for use in canvassing 
furnished on application. 



PATENTS 



promptly obtained OR NO FEE. Trade-Marks, 
Caveats, Copyrights and Labels registered. 
TWENTY YEARS' PRACTICE. Highest references. 
Send model, sketch or photo, for free report 
on patentability. All business confidential. 
HAND-BOOK FREE. Explains everything. Telia 
How to Obtain and Sell Patents, What Inventions 
Will Pay, How to Get a Partner, explains best 
mechanical movements, and contains 300 other 
subjects of importance to inventors. Address, 



H. B. WILLSON & GO. 



Patent 
Attorneys 
786 F Street, N. W., WASHINGTON, D. C. 



r*i 



My splendid premium, the hammerless 
Ithaca, is not only a beautiful gun, but a 
close, hard shooter. I thank you for your 
generosity and fair dealing. 

A. J. Johnston, Wilkinsburg, Pa. 




flusical Clock 



A skilled mechanic 
has invented lately a 
f which, besides keeping perfect time, running 8 days 
with one winding, striking the hours and halves, will 
also play favorite airs every half hour. As the cost 
is very low, many prefer buying the clock with the mu- 
sical attachment. Ask your jeweler for it or send to 
E. L. CUENDET, Mfr. f 7 Barclay Street, New York 



RECREATION. 



XXXV 



f Save Hall Your Cigar money 

We are making a great success of selling 
direi-t from factory to smoker exclusively, at 
half retail prices, the best possible cigars- 
all time tested, tried-out brands ; not one blend 
but many, to suit every possible taste. We 
have made a reputation for quality during the 
years we sold to dealers. Now we are making 
a reputation for saving in price as well, when 

we sell direct from factory to you. 

The saving in price does not come from out 
of the cigars — they are better than ever. It 
comes from saving you the jobbers', th 
wholesalers' and the retailers' profits 
— three profits in your pocket. The 
saving in price is clear to all. You can 
prove without risk, how we'll please/ 
you in quality and critically satisfy ( 
your taste, for if you don't get as good \ 
a cigar or a better one from us for less 
money than you pay now — if you are 
not altogether pleased, you get your 
money back. 




and Gei a Better Smoke 1 

Why throw away one half your cigar money 
on any "in between man" in the face of a 
"no risk" guarantee like this? 

We will at first send you assortments from 
which to make selections. For 60 CtS. an 
assortment of 12 cigars showing ten cent and 
two for a quarter values; for 35 CtS., 12 high 
grade fives; for $1.00, a trial box of 25 ci- 
gars, showing fifteen 10c. values and ten 
straight 5c. cigars; for $1.^5, an assort- 
ment of 25 ten cent and three-for-a-quarter 
values, each separately wrapped and de- 
scribed, showing you how two-for-a- 
quarter and ten cent cigars can be 
bought in boxes of 25 and 50 for from 4 
to 6 cts. each, others from 2 to 3 cts. 
each, all transportation charges 
prepaid, or let us send you our free 
illustrated booklet, "Rolled Reveries. 1 ' 



"Le Grande, Cal. — They are better 
than I could get here for twice the money." — Name supplied on request. 



JOHN B. ROGERS & CO., "The Pioneers." 



93 Jarvis Street, MNGHAMTON, N. Y. 



I once had a Marlin shot gun, which, but 
for 2 faults, would have been a desirable 
weapon. It overshot, and the extractor 
was so weak that if the shell swelled at all 
it remained in the barrel for me to get out 
as best I could. 

I still have a Marlin rifle that I bought 
several years ago to take on a deer hunt. 
When about ready to start, I discovered 
that the extractor was broken. I wrote 
the Marlin people for another, saying I 
would send money on receipt of bill, as I 
did not know the price. They replied that 
they did not care to open small accounts, 
but would send extractor when I sent the 
money. Having no time nor desire for 
further correspondence I hung their gun 
up and bought a Winchester. The Marlin 
still hangs, awaiting the coming of some 
one fool enough to buy it. 

Peters' old Victor shell, primed with 
black power and loaded with King's, was 
exceedingly unsatisfactory. Sometimes the 
primer would not explode, and the pene- 
tration was always poor. Now that they 
are putting out a better class of goods, they 
make a mistake in not advertising again in 
Recreation. It would double the sale of 
their goods. Subscriber, Topsham, Me. 



ILLUSTRATING is a Money=Making 

profession. We teach you by mail to become 
an Illustrator, Ad.-Writer, Journalist, 
Proofreader, Bookkeeper, Stenograph- 
er, Electrician, Electrical Engineer,etc. 
Write for Free illustrated book, "Struggles 
With the World," and mention the subject 
which interests you. Correspondence InstU 
tuteof America, Box 701, SCRANTON, PA. 




ATTENTION BASS FISHERMEN!! 

What It Is. A Bass lure combining all 
the good points of the old fashioned spinner 
baits with the construction of the modern 
wooden minnow. 

What It Will Do. This lure is construc- 
ted in a new manner with a new feature and 
will catch more bass than any other artifi- 
cial lure. 

How To Get It. Send one dollar tc 
Recreation for a year's subscription to be 
credited to my account aud I will mail you 
one postpaid. W. B. HAYNES, 274 Park 
Street, Akron, Ohio. 



pppp To anyone subscribing to Recreation. 
X 1V1- A-. through me I will give a cloth copy of one 
ot Cooper's, Dickens', Dumas', Thackeray's or Conap 
Doyle's books. Address, 

J. M. RUGEN, 2100 West Lake St., Chicago, III. 




48c. 




HERE IS A KNIFE Men Love So Much 
They Hate to Throw an Old Handle Awa v 

Was Teddy's Camp Knife ! 

No. 58. Cut is exact 
size ; ebony handle, 3 
blades, German Silver 
ends. The long blade is 
for rough or fine work ; 
the medium blade is as 
thin as a razor. Price, 
postpaid, $1, 6 for $5. 

Our JACK KJSIFE 

sells at 75c.; our special price is 48c, postpaid, 5 for 

All our blades file tested ; warranted ; 

replaced^ free if soft or flawy. 

' hollow ground Razor 

and Strop to suit, 

$1.33. Send for free 

80 page list and "How 

to Use a Razor. 

Maher & Grosh Co. 

744 Street 
Toledo Ohio 



XXXVI 



RECREATION. 



Paint Your House 

With Carrara 

And Have it Guaranteed to Look Better, Wear 

Longer, and Cost Less Than the Best 

White Lead Paints. 



We Send Name of Nearest Carrara Dealer, 50 Sample Colors and 

Illustrated Book, " How to Paint a House," Free to 

All Who Send Name and Address. 

There is but one "Carrara." It is made by the Carrara 

Paint Agency, 1007 Carrara Building, Cincinnati. O., and it 

is the only paint in the world that is absolutely guaranteed 

: not to fade, crack, chalk, 
peel, blister or scale. It 
is not affected by acids or 
gases, and it covers more 
surface gallon for gallon 
than the best white lead 
and oil and costslessthan 
the cheap mixed paints 
that injure more than they 
protect. 

Carrara is used by the 
Pennsylvania R. R. ; the 
Pullman Palace Car Co.; 
the Chicago Telephone 
Co.; the Field Museum, 
Chicago; the Kenwood 
Club, Chicago; the Cin- 
cinnati Southern R. R. ; 
the Chicago & Eastern 
Illinois R. R. ; the Denver 
& Rio Grande Railway and 

-,-■., ,.., thousands of others of the 

The Waldorf-Astoria, Mew j st and most ticu . 

York, One of the Most Magmfi- lar K users of paint F in the 

cent Hotels in the World, Has wor ]d. The famous Wal- 

Used Tons and Tons of the dorf-Astoria hotel, of 

World-Famous Carrara Paint. New York, one of the 

finest in the world, has used tons of Catrara because it is the 

best that can be found in the market today. 

For interior or exterior it has no equal. Smooth and clean, 

it has stood the rigid test of time and man. If you want to 

save half your paint bills send your name and address for 

nearest distributing depots, 50 sample colors and a beautiful 

illustrated book sent free, showing a large number of tine 

houses just as they have been painted with Carrara, and 

keep well in mind that Carrara is the only paint ever backed 

by a positive guarantee in every case. 

REVELL & CO. 

CHICAGO 





FURNITURE 
OFFICE DESKS 

THE LARGEST DISPLAY 
THE LOWEST PRICES 

ALEXANDER H: REVELL & CO. 

Wabash Ave- and Adams St., CHICAGO, ILL. 




Stallman's 
Dresser 



Have you seen one? It is 

up-to-date. Think of it, 

everything within reach. No 

heavy trays, but light, smooth 

drawers. Holds as much and costs 

no more than a good box trunk. 

IT* 1 Hand riveted, almost indestructible. 

■ "PllTlK Once tried, always recommended. 

* * H***X g ent q # o. D., privilege examination. 

ac. stamp for catalogue. Mention Recreation. 

^ F. A. STALLMAN. 
*ai W. SoriruJ St., Columbus, O. 




If so, why not get a good one ? 
And why not get it free of charge ? 
This is easy. 

Any old box will answer the purpose if it 
does not leak light; but you must have 
a fine lens to make a fine picture. 

You can get 



A Royal Anastigmat 
Lens, 4x5, Series No. 



1 



Made by the Rochester Lens Co., Rochester 
New York, 

And listed at $45, 

For 20 yearly subscrip= 

tions to RECREATION 

You can get any other lens made by this 
Company on a basis of one subscription 
to $2. of the list price of the lens. 

Sample copies of Recreation for use in 
soliciting furnished on application. 






RECREATION. 



XXXVll 



kl 



Alcohol, 
Opium, 
Tobacco 
Using/P 



Produce each a disease 
having definite patholo- 
gy. The disease yields 
easily to the Treatment 
as administered at the 
following Keeley Insti- 
tutes : 




WHAT THE v 

RT. REV. JOHN SHANLEY 
BISHOP OF NORTH DAKOTA, Says: 

It is because I know it does 
save them, because I know it is 
God's truth that I take the deep- 
est interest in the Keeley Cure, 
and so long as I live I shall raise 
my voice in advocating* its efficacy. 

Rt. Rev. JOHN SHANLEY, 

Bishop of North Dakota. 

Details of treatment and proofs of its success sent free on application. 



ALWAYS ADDRESS THE INSTITUTE NEAREST TO YOU. 
Birmingham, Ala. Des Moines, la. Omaha, Neb. Providence, R. I. 

Hot Springs, Ark. Crab Orchard, Ky. Cor. Leavenworth Columbia, S. C. 

Los Angeles, Cal. New Orleans, La., _ and 19th Streets Dallas, Tex., 



San Francisco, Cal., 1628-38 Felicity St. Buffalo, N. Y. 

1170 Market St. Portland, Me. White Plains, N. Y. 

West Haven, Conn. Lexington, Mass. Columbus, 0. 
Washington, D. C, Grand Rapids, Mich, Portland, Ore. 

211 N. Capitol St. St. Louis, Mo. Harrisburg, Pa. 

Augusta, Ga. Boulder, Mont. Philadelphia, Pa., 

Dwight, 111. Fargo, N. D. 812 N. Broad St. Winnipeg, Man. 

Charlestown, Ind. North Conway, N. H. Pittsburgh, Pa., London, Eng. 

Marion, Ind. 4246 Fifth Ave. Cape Town, S. A. 



Rgv.t. DeWitt Tannage's famous lecture, "Evils of Intemperance," mailed on application. 



Bellevue Place. 
Richmond, Va. 
Seattle, Wash. 
Huntington, W. Va. 
Waukesha, Wis. 
Toronto, Ont. 




Free — To each person sending me $i 
(post-office money order) for one year's 
subscription to Recreation, I will send 
choice of a Braided Leather Dog Whip, 
with a steel snap on end, on a Polished 
Steel Dog Chain, with swivels, snaps, etc., 
or one dozen assorted Trout Flies, silk 
bodies, good ones, or a Pocket Compass, one 
inch dial, open face, watch shape, with ring 
handle and bevel crystal. Also a special 
offer limited to the months of June, July, 
August and September of a nickel plated 
multiplying 40 yard raised pillar reel, bal- 
ance handle with click, drag and free run- 
ning for two subscriptions. For four sub- 
scriptions a genuine 6 strip Split Bamboo 
or Fly Rod, 4 pieces with grips, silk whip- 
ped, nickel plated mountings, solid metal 
reel seat, length about g J / 2 feet. 

Edward S. Adams, 
Box 536, Manchester, N. H. 



I have always thought the Marlin the 
neatest rifle on the market, and I like 
its side ejecting feature; but the action is 
defective. I bought a Marlin 22, model '97, 
about 18 months ago. It has been shot 
about 1,000 times. From the first it would 
occasionally clog so I could not close the 
action until it was taken apart. It has be- 
come so bad now it can not be used as a 
repeater at all. I think the magazine spring 
has become too weak to push the cartridge 
entirely out of the magazine, so the shell 
can not rise when the lever is drawn back. 

I can not understand why the Marlin Co. 
persists in sending out guns with such a de- 
fective action, when it could be so easily 
remedied by using an extracting hook sim- 
ilar to that in Winchester guns to draw the 
cartridges from the magazine. I like Rec- 
reation. It is doing good work. I know 
it has helped me, and I intend to do all I 
can for it in return. A. G. Bevan, 

Martinsburg, Ind. 




The " Victor" 



is the real talking machine; 

its sound is natural. Band 
playing, monologues, comic or religious songs, all are reproduced 
as clear as it the artist was present. When ordering, get the 
latest styles — we charge no more than others who offer you old 
styles. Get our full catalogue FREE. 

E. t. Cuendet, 7 Bar#lay St., New York, 



XXXV111 



RECREATION. 




WEBBER'S 

JERSEY COAT 

Costs no more than old-fashioned blouse to pull 
over the head. Designed for trap shooting in 
hot weather, but suitable for any purpose. 
Good thing for fishing, chicken shooting or office 
coat. Very light weight but strong and made 
to fit. Ask your dealer for it. If he does not 
have them, send me your size and price, $2, 
and I will send you one to fit, charges prepaid. 

GEORGE F. WEBBER, flFR. 

Station A, Detroit, nich. 




The Celebrated 

THOMPSON- 
QUIMBY 

Hunting 
Boots, 
Shoes and 
Mocca- 



i 

have 
on file 
m e a s 
urements 
of all who 
bought 
Boots and 
Shoes of the 
W.Fred Quimby 
Co., of New York 
for the past 20 
years, and I make 
the same grade of 
sportsmen's foot- 
wear as they made. 
I was s u p e r i n 
tendent of the 
shoe department 
of that firm and bought the 
right to make these boots and 
shoes. Get a pair now. They 
will last years and are the cheap, 
est in the end. I refer by permis 
sion to the Editor of Recreation 
Measurement blanks and prices c 
application. Mention Recreation 

T. H. GUTHRIE 

33 William Street, NEWARK, 




Guaran- 







The Marble safety axe you sent me as 
a premium was received in good order It 
is a necessity in every sportsman's outfit. 
J. D. Fulwood, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



The Wizard camera given me as a pre- 
mium for subscribers to your valuable mag- 
azine is a fine one. 

L. L. Loomis, Cleveland, O. 




flusic Boxes 



For the Home, it is com- 
pany at all times, will 
cheer you when you are 
sad; a veritable need when you are lonely; an accompaniment 
to your song, and play Dance music in perfect time. A boon 
to all music lovers. Our variety is great; prices to suit all. 
Our No. 20 costs only $2.50, while our No. 191 runs in the hun- 
dreds. Complete Catalogues FREE. 

E. L. CUENDET, 7 Barclay St., New York 




The Reason the LUTHER HAND-MADE GLOVE will not rip 




Machine sewing cuts itself 



Hand sewing cannot. 



A Practical HuntiQ s and 

===== Driving Glove 

Made for practical, comfortable, durability. No Oil. No 
Odor. No Animal Glue. Practically seamless. Cannot 
Rip. Unaffected by moisture of any kind. If soiled, may 
be washed with soap and hot water, without injury. The 
Luther Fastener is adjustable, fits any wrist and cannot get out of order 
Illustrated booklet, samples and self measurement rule on application. 
If you prefer jf , 308 Driving Glove postpaid anywhere $1 .50, made to measure $2 

to buy through Wo320Gaulltlet «f * 2 .50, " " 3 

jour dealer * * 

J. P. LUTHER GLOVE CO., 636 Pearl St.. Berlin, Wis. 




Bend us his 
Hams 



RECREATION. 



XXXIX 



In a recent issue of Recreation I read 
of the Marlin people refusing to send a 
spring to a man stranded in the woods. I 
wish to tell your readers of a courtesy ex- 
tended to me by another arms company. 
I wrote asking the price of a mainspring 
to replace one I had broken. For answer 
they sent me the spring and a bill for 
same and credited me 2 cents for the stamp 
I enclosed for reply. That is the differ- 
ence between dealing with a firm that tries 
to do the fair thing and one that does not. 
Have never owned a Marlin arm and do 
not wish to, as I never saw one that would 
work right. 

I have also a word of caution for users 
of Winchester shot guns. Do not put oil 
in the action in cold weather. I oiled 
mine freely and started out to hunt 
bunnies one cold day. When the first 
rabbit got up I snapped 2 shells at him. 
When examined the primers were not 
even dented. The firing pin was locked 
with frozen oil. On trial, my companion 
discovered that his pump was frozen, too. 
By snapping the hammer repeatedly I final- 
ly freed the pin, but my friend's gun would 
not work until warmed. The next day I 
took the action apart, wiped everything 
dry and since then have had no trouble. 
R. R. C, Rochelle, 111. 

Free : For I year's subscription of Rec- 
reation, through me, will give I Bromide 
enlargement, any size up to 11x14 inches, 
inclusive, from any negative not larger than 
4x5; or from photographs. Negatives and 
Photos are to be returned to the owner. 
Here is a rare chance to get a large Photo 
from your pet Negative, also Recreation 
for $1. A. F. Evarts, Meriden, Conn. 

White Mountain Views Free 

To any person sending me a Subscription to 
Recreation accompanied by $1. I will send two 
mounted photos, on velox paper taken among the 
White Mountains, size 6x8; one shows Mt. Wash- 
ington snow capped. To any one sending 2 sub- 
scriptions with $2 I will send a souvenir of the 
White Mountains, size ^ l / 2 x b l / 2 containing seven 
photos. Send P. O. Money Order. 

M. E. TVTTLE, Box 337 Dover, N. H. 

FREE BOOK, WEAK MEN 

My illustrated nature book on losses 
varicocele, impotency, lame back, free 
sealed, by mail. Much valuable advice 
and describes the new DR. SANDEN 
HERCULEX ELECTRIC BELT. 
Worn nights. No drugs. Currents 
soothing. Used by women also for 
rheumatic pains, etc. 5.000 cures 1902 
Established 30 years. Advice free. 
DR. G.B. SANDEN, 

1155 Broadway, N.Y- 




Rtfptt*re=Varicocele=Hydrocele 
Resulting Nervous Diseases 

New discoveries regarding: their scientific treat- 
ment are described and illustrated. The hook 
is sent sealed for ten cents. 

I>. I>. RICHARDSON, M. D. 
ySuite 622, 123 Michigan Avenue, CHICAGO 



ARE YOU GOING BLIND 

Or in Any Way Troubled 
With Your Eyes? 

Write to Dr. Oren Oneal, the Noted 
Oculist of Chicago 




Do not allow yourself to go blind. This well 
known specialist, by his absolutely new method 
of painless home treatment, known as the Oneal 
Dissolvent Method, is able to prevent blindness 
and to cure all diseases and defects of the eyes. 
His success is attested by thousands of cured 
cases in all parts of the world whose names are 
available to inquirers as personal reference. 

TEST YOUR EYES 

Do you see objects as through a haze ? 

Does the atmosphere seem smoky or foggy ? 

Do spots or specks dance before the eyes ? 

Do you see more clearly some days than 
others ? 

Do you see better sideways than straightfor- 
ward? 

Do you see better in the evening or just after 
sundown ? 

Does a candle or street lamp seem expanded 
into a large flame? 

Does a lamp or electric light seem to have a 
halo about it ? 

Do luminous objects like the moon seem to be 
double or multiplied ? 

Any one of the above symptoms indicate a 
grave affection of the eyes "which will result in 
blindness if not attended to very soon. 

Any case of blindness or any other eye trouble 
can be successfully treated by Dr. Oneal at 
patient's own home, quickly and at small ex- 
pense. 

Among Dr. Oneal's recent notable cures are the 
following: H. S. Davis, 211 Colchester St., Bur- 
lington, Vt., cataracts Mrs. A. P. Rifle, 78 Niag- 
ara St., Buffalo, N. Y., cataracts; Carlton Hughes, 
316 B St., S. W. Washington, D. C, cataracts; 
Mrs. H. Burdick, Richland Center, Wis., hem- 
orrhage of retina Mrs. C. H. Sweetland, 
Hamburg. la., paresis of the optic nerve. These 
people cured themselves at their own homes, as 
have thousands of others. 

Write for illustrated book which gives detailed 
information, references and testimonials. It is 
sent free to any one who is interested enough to 
ask for it. Dr. Oneal will also be pleased to give a 
written opinion on any case of eye disease. Address 

OREN ONEAL, M. D., 

Suite 839. 52 Dearborn St., Chicago, 111., U. S. A, 



&T 



RECREATION. 



RELICS OF A DISAPPEARING RACE 



Buffalo Skulls 

WITH POLISHED OR 
UNPOLISHED HORNS 

Also polished or unpolished horns in pairs or single. 
Polished horns tipped with incandescent electric lights ; 
polished hunting horns ; mirrors hung in polished horns, 
etc. These are decided novelties and are in great de- 
mand for sportsmen's dens, offices, club-rooms, halls, 
etc. Send for illustrated catalog. Mention Recrea- 
tion. 

> , E. W. STILES 
141 Washington St. Hartford, Conn. 




SPORTSMEN-Learn Taxidermy by Mail. 

No Sportsman is properly equipped to enjoy hunting and fishing unless he is able to 
mount his beautiful trophies. Our school has the hearty endorsement of leading sportsmen 
and naturalises everywhere. Everything included by the term Natural History, taught with 
entire success by correspondence. Just what you need and have always wanted. Best 
of methods. Tuition very reasonable. We want to tell you all about it. Write today for 
FREE Catalog, Mention Recreation. Our school was organized for your benefit. 

THE NORTHWESTERN SCHOOL OF TAXIDERMY 

411 A Bee Bldg, OMAHA, NEBR. 




High-Bred Pointers 

I have six high-bred, thoroughly well broken 
black and white pointers for sale, 

They are two years old and eligible to registra- 
tion—King of Kent strain, sired by Hal Pointer. 

They are staunch on point, tender retrievers, 
wide rangers, good bird finders, strong and 
healthy, of good disposition, and steady under 
the gun. Every dog guaranteed. 

Photograph and copy of pedigree furnished on 
receipt of 10c. to cover postage. 

Dr. W. A. Dorland 

Grand Rapids, Hich. 

For Want of Gash Must Sell Quick 

10 pair of Wood Ducks, 15 pair of Blue Wing Teal, 
10 pair of Green Wing Teal, 14 pair of Garganey 
Teal, 10 pair of Pintails, 5 pair of Shovellers, 10 pair 
Gadwalls, 20 pair Wild Mallards, 20 pair of Gray and 
White Calls, 5 pair of Black Ducks, Trio of Brant, 
3 pair white Swans (European) $30; 50 Mongolian, 
Ringneck, Chinese Hybrid. Silver and Golden Pheas- 
ants: 1,000 pair of Imported Homers for Squab 
breeding; so Imported Runts, 20 pairs imported 
Peafowls. Book on Pheasant keeping and Squab 
raising. Send 2 stamps for my booklet that tells 
"HOW TO MAKE MONEY" breeding Squabs, 
Pheasants and Quail. I want t« buy all kinds of 
Live Animals, Wild Ducks, etc. 

GENEI DeGUARDINER, Natick, Mass. 

Sq/ucJZr fiaxfk fA»&> 

Squabs are raised in 1 month, bring big 
prices. Eager market. Astonishing 
profits. Easy for women and invalids. 
Use your spare time profitably. Small 
space and capital. Here is something 
worth looking into. Facts given in our 
FREE BOOK, " How to make money 
with Squabs'' PLYMOUTH ROCK 
SQUAB CO., 11 Friend St., Boston, Mass. 




Taxidermists' G fe»5ra& 

ana Animals 
Oologists' and m/f - • - 1 

iSppu;L oglst8 ' Materials 

Send 5c. in stamps for catalogue 

FBED. KAEMPFER, **<££*£&?■' 

Taxidermy work done in all its branches 

Mention Recreation 

For Sale. The largest collection of Game 
Heads, Horns, and Antlers in America. A 
total of TWO HUNDRED AND FIFTY 
SPECIMENS, including many record heads 
and exceptional freaks and rarities. Full 
information and catalogue on application. 
A. E. COLBURN, 
Bond Building, Washington, D. C. 

FLORIDA BIRDS. 

I have on hand a fair assortment of our Native Bird 
Skins, suitable for schools, museums or private collec- 
tions. 

During the season of 1903 I will collect any birds or 
mammals to order. 

Finest mounted work a specialty. 

R. D. HOYT, Taxidermist, 

SEVEN OAKS, FLA. 



Cavies or Guinea Pigs 

Peruvian, Abyssinian or 
English Long or Short 
Haired. All colors. 400 
to select from. 

T. RACKHAM, 

East Orange, New Jersey. 



MNE MOUNTED GAME HEADS, 

1 BIRDS, ETC.. for sale at unheard-of prices. 

Send 10 cents for photos. 
JOH> T CLAYTON, Taxidermist, Lincoln, Maiuo 




RECREATION. 



xli 



I see that the article I wrote for Recrea- 
tion in May, 1901, in regard to Peters 
shells not working properly in a Winches- 
ter repeating shot gun, fore arm action, has 
provoked a controversy. Some condemn 
me and say I do not know what I am talk- 
ing about, but I am pleased to note that the 
majority of sportsmen are with me. 

I repeat my assertion that the Peters 
shells are not practicable for use in the 
above mentioned arm. I have tried them 
repeatedly, only to have 2 shells enter the 
magazine at once, thereby blocking the 
action. The U. M. C. cartridges are good 
enough for me. In fact they are the best 
I have ever found. As long as the Peters 
people act in the present childish manner 
towards you and Recreation, I don't want 
their cartridges 

C, S. Radcliff, Cincinnati, O. 



The Best Offer Yet.— To any person who 
will subscribe to Recreation for one year 
through me I will send free a small water 
color landscape, hand painted, suitable for 
framing ; or a hand painted silk bookmark. 
For two subscriptions I will send a fine 
Mexican opal scarf pin worth ordinarily 
from $1 to $1.50. 

Don M. Harris, 308 Crawford Road, 

Cleveland, Ohio. 



The Buffalo Is Well Nigh Extinct 

And every nature lover wants a relic 
of him. Here is a chance to get it : 
I have in stock a limited number of 
buffalo horns, highly polished and 
fitted with nickel plated flanges at 
the base, so that they can be 
screwed on the wall, thus forming 

A Novel and 
Effective Gun Rack 

So long as the supply lasts I will 
give a pair of these horns for 

3 Yearly Subscriptions to RECREATION 

Sample copies for use in canvassing 
furnished on request. Address 

Recreation, 23 W. 24th St., New York 




Dress 

for 
Comfort 



Because of their construction 

PRESIDENT 
SUSPENDERS 

give most 

Comfort & Service 

Guaranteed "All breaks made good" 
*« President'' on buckle means 

'♦Cannot rust* 50c. and $1.00 

Any shop or by mail prepaid 
<Ihe C. A. Edgarton Mfg. Co. 
Box 219 O.Shirley Mass 
Send 6c. for Catalogue 



SQUIRES' SIBERIAN MOOSE 
HUNTING BOOTS & SHOES 

Made only by HENRY C. SQUIRES <S. SON 
20 Cortlandt St., New York 
The leather is waterproof, fine grained, 
tough and pliable. The 
linings are russet calf- 
skin. The soles are 
best waterproof anhy- 
drous oak I eat her, 
stitching of silk, Eng- 
lish back stays, bulldog 
toes, extra heavy eye- 
lets, Pratt fasteners 
and hand made 
throughout. Price 
$7.50 net. Short Boots 
$8.50, Knee Boots 
$10, Cavalry Style 
Boots $12. 
Special circular 
giving detailed 
information 
free for the 
asking. 




Mention Recreation. 



xlii RECREATION. 



STILL ANOTHER GREAT OFFER 

A Grade 00 Syracuse Gun 



Listed at $30 . 



FOR 



25 Yearly Subscriptions 



TO 



Recreation 



If yon Want one of the Guns get a move on yon 

Sample copies for use in canvassing 
furnished on application 



RECREATION, 23 W. 24th Street, New York 



RECREATION. 



xliii 



^0mtmm,; *;..*. . maul* 



: 



|t™ "BRISTOL"! 

STEEL FISHING RODS 

| HAVE BECOME A STAPLE NECESSITY. 



As they are made in twenty- 
five different styles and sizes 
weighing from 6% to 1 1 ^ 
ounces, there is a wide range 
of choice. Fisher -men — 
and women, too — are de- 
lighted with their action, 
and are pleased to recom- 
mend them. Send for our 1 
Free Catalogue, and | 
le 

buy 
will do. Address 



irt' 



tt 



w 



■■m 



■ : , 



'ree Catalogue, and m 
^arn what it tells — then 15 
uy a rod and see what it | 






m 



Sh. 



'Svl 



■:. A 



m 



TheHortonMfg.Co. 

No,?3Horton Street, 
Bristol, Conn. 



iE 



ii^::S' 



■ 






K|0 |5S^ 



3 j% 



§*'¥* 'jlf <** 



f''" 



•>■- 



,m 









■ 







:;;;;;:;,,;;■;;:;; 



xliv 



RECREATION. 




^^^m^MMMM^M^^^MM^SM!M!SMS^^S!^S 



This is "PeLrdrver" 

and the 15 lb. Rainbow trout caught by " Pardner's " partner, " El 
Comancho," in the Skykomish River, Wash., on May 14th, last, 

Landed tvith a 

"Y 5 E w AUTOMATIC REEL 

The only Automatic Reel with free running feature, and therefore the 

only perfect reel for fly-and-bait-casting. Special prize of $20.00. 

wiil be given for biggest Rainbow trout caught during 1903. 

Are you in ? Write to-day for 
contest blank showing five other 
money prizes and handsome cat- 
alogue 299 R. 



Si 



l& 




Little 
Finger 
does it^T= 



YAWMAN & ERBE 



MFG. CO. 

ROCHESTER, N. 



Y. 



,v 

t 



•-> 




•ffPWMppaiBpp^^ 



mm 



Small Profits— Quick Sales 




for trial — senfl us 



■i tZ(+ fp r an assorted sample doz. 



Regular price, 24 cents. 

for an assorted sampl 
Regular price, 60 cents. 



^f\r* f° r an assorted sample doz. 

• f\r» for an assorted sample doz. 
OUv Regular price, 84 cents. 

• (\f» for an assorted dozen 
Ovt Regular price 84 cents. 



Quality A Flies 
Quality B Flies 
Quality C Flies 
Bass Flies 



SPLIT BAMBOO RODS 



Fly Rods 



10 feet, 6 ounces 



57 cents 



Bait Rods 

9 feet, 8 ounces 



With cork grip and extra tip, in wood form 



Try our new Braided Silk Enameled Waterproof 

METAL CENTER LINE 

Size No. 5, 4% cents per yard. Size No. 4, 5% cents per yard 
Put up in 10-yard lengths connected. 

THE H H. KIFFE CO. 

523 Broadway, New York City 

Catalogs of any of above goods free on application. 
Mention Recreation. 



Do you enjoy big game hunting ? 
Or Trout Fishing? 

Or flountain Climbing? 
If so, write vs and we can accommodate you. 

We keep 65 head of horses. We employ a full corps 
of experienced guides, packers, and cooks. 

We have a complete outfit of riding saddles, pack 
saddles, tents, stoves, cooking utensils, tableware, and 
everything necessary for touring and camping in the 
Mountains. 

We live at Banff. The Eastern gateway of the 
Canadian Rockies. 

And can send you anywhere you may wish to go from 
this point 

North j East, South or West. 

Address: BREWSTER BROS. 

Banff, Alberta, Canada. 



T,oAduer~ 
tiser ; 



A DOLLAR RATE BOOK FREE 

We will send postpaid, entirely without charge, to any business 
house that is interested in the subject of advertising, a copy of a 
bound volume we have recently issued entitled " Current Rates of 
Live Publications," giving: list of leading towns throughout U. S., 
populations, principal papers, circulations and publishers' rates for 
advertising space on small and large contracts. Regular price of 
this volume is $1 — We will send free upon receipt of ten cents in 
stamps to cover postage. 

FULFORI). PAINTER & TOBEY, Inc., Advertising Agents 
N. W. Cor. Wabash Ave. and Randolph St. CHICACO, ILL. 



A Hunting Knife Free. To any person 
sending me three yearly subscriptions to 
Recreation and $3, I will send a pocket 
hunting knife with handle 5^ inches long 
and blade 5 inches long. Fine steel, excel- 
lent workmanship. Your name and address 
and your L.A.S. number if desired inserted, 
on a plate in the handle. 

Geo. W. Mains, McKeespQrt, Pa, 









RECREATION. 



xlv 



Arc You an Amatcvr 
Photographer ? 




It' so, would you like a Camera 
that will photograph 

whole range of mountains 
whole sweep of river 
whole army 
whole fleet of ships 
whole city 

Or any other stretch of scenery or moving' 
objects. THE SWING LENS DOES IT 



A 



The 



Al Vista 



Is the thing. It Lists at $30 

One of the greatest inventions of the age. 
Given as apremium for 12 subscriptions. 



For Particulars Address 

RECREATION, 23 W. 24th St., N. Y. 



REMARKABLE OFFERS 

To every person who will send Recrea- 
tion $i for i year's subscription to be 
placed to my credit I will give as a premium 
a choice of a Nickel Plated Match Safe, or 
a Gilt Metal Match Safe, or a Hard Rubber 
Water Proof Match Safe, each listed at 
40 cents ; or a Nickel Dog Whistle and 
pocket drinking cup, listed at 50 cents ; 
or a Nail Clipper, with file and Nail 
Clipper attached, listed at 40 cents ; or 
a 25 yard Single Action Reel, listed at 40 
cents; or a 25 yard Water Proof Silk Line/ 
listed at 50 cents. 

For 2 subscriptions a Hunting Knife, 
Stag Handle, Blade s J A inches long, listed 
at $1. 

For 3 subscriptions a Patent Double Min- 
now Bucket, listed at $2 ; or a 60 yard 
Multiplying Reel, listed at $2; or a 3-piece 
Bamboo Rod, 7 or 9 feet long, listed at $2; 
or a Heavy Silk Watch Fob, listed at $1.50. 

For 5 subscriptions a fancy striped Ham- 
mock, listed at $3 ; or a Hunting Knife, 
listed at $3 ; or a Tackle Box, listed at $3. 

For 9 subscriptions a field glass listed at 
$6. 

Only a limited number of subscriptions 
can be accepted on these offers. 

E. W. Jacobs, Coshocton, Ohio. 



IN ANSWERING ADS 
MENTION RECREATION, 



PLEASE 



&3KH0TAI* 



BLUE FLAME 



-'-& 




A 



y 



■* ^yilala 



THE Khotal Blue Flame Oil Stove is the 
best stove for any one indulging in the 
pleasures of outdoor life. Absolutely 
non-explosive. Light and portable, requires 
little attention, and does not smoke, smell, or 
soot. No wicks. Produces any temperature 
of heat; simple in operation, and with ordinary 
care will last for years. Indispensable to 
yachtsmen and campers. Made in different 
sizes at prices from $3. 75 up. Send for our 
illustrated catalogue, quoting sizes and prices. 

KHOTAL BURNER COMPANY 

197 Fulton Street, New York 



IT NEVER FAILS 

The S. & W. Artificial Bait 

Is the most successful 
bait made. 

When in motion it re- 
sembles a minnow so 
closely that it never fails 
to delude the fish. 
Its construction makes 
it almost impossible for 
a fish to strike and not 
get caught 

A GREAT SELLER 

Do you fish? Buy one. 
You will never be with- 
out one afterward. 
Why? It will catch fish. 
Can be used with rod or 
hand line. 

Dealers send for illustrated 
booklet and get our prices. 

If your dealer cannot supply you, send 50c. 
at once for one (post paid) to 

STARK & WECKESSER 

57 S. Main St. : : : DAYTON, OHIO, U. S. A. 




xlvi 



RECREATION. 



Fisk's Aerating 
Minnow Pa.il 




e only 
Minnow Pail 
in which Min- 
nows can be 
kept alive in- 
definitely. 

Has an air 
chamber at 
the bottom 
holding 260CU- 
bic inches of 
condensed air 
forced in by 
the Air Pump 
attached, and 
by a simple 
rubberattach- 
menttheairis 
allowed to es- 
cape into the 
water gradu- 
ally supply- 
ing the fish 

with the oxygen consumed by them. One pumping 

is sufficient for ten hours. 

Height, 1 foot; diameter, 10 inches; weight, 7% 

lbs.; water, 2% gallons; keeps 50 to 150 minnows, 

according to their size. 

IT KEEPS THEM ALIVE 

Send for circular Mention Recreation 

J. M. KENYON & CO. 

214 Twelfth St., Toledo, Ohio, V. S. A. 



SLEEP 

IS TIRED NATURE'S 
SWEET RESTORER 

After a hard day's tramp, you 
must have 

A GOOD NIGHT'S REST 

in order to fit you for the next 

day's work. 

Better to sleep on a good bed 

without your dinner, than sip at 

a banquet and then sleep on the 

cold, hard, wet ground. 

You can get 

A Recreation 

Camp Mattress 

of rubber, with valve for inflat- 
ing, made by the Pneumatic 
Mattress Co. and listed at $18 

For J 5 Yearly Subscriptions 

to RECREATION 

Send /or Sample Copies 

Address BECB1ATI0N, 23 TT. 2i%h Stmt, Nw lorfc 



THE BRISTOL AS A SALT WATER 
ROD. 

There are 2 articles advertised in Rec- 
reation that I should like to say a word 
about: the Shakespeare Revolution bait and 
the Bristol rod. The rod, a No. n Hen- 
shall, I have used the last 2 seasons, and 
want no better. When I first appeared 
with this rod on a fishing trip to waters 
near the Gulf of Mexico, a friend, an an- 
gler of experience, said there was no bet- 
ter rod made, but that several he had 
used in that particular locality had rusted 
inside and broken. Acting on this hint, I 
cleaned my rod thoroughly by means of a 
cleaning wire prepared for the purpose, and 
then coated the interior with a gun grease 
that I knew from experience would prevent 
rust. Then I fitted plugs in the open ends, 
and pushed them down into the rod until 
there was just enough room to receive the 
ferrules where the rod was jointed. By care 
I have kept all rust from the exposed por- 
tion in the ferrule seats. These seats are 
cleaned after every day's fishing. 

So much for the interior. I scraped all 
the enamel off the outside of the rod, as I 
found it could be chipped in use. A fresh 
coat of enamel was then applied, and when 
this had dried sufficiently to become sticky, 
fine silk thread was wound the whole 
length of the rod. This was readily ac- 
complished by placing the spool of silk on 
a sewing machine, drawing the silk through 
the tension, and after starting the winding, 
completing the job by rotating the rod in 
my fingers, so as to wind the silk evenly. 
An alcohol flame carefully applied to the 
silk burned off the fuzz or nap, when a coat 
of enamel was laid on smoothly. Of 
course, care was taken not to scorch the 
silk. 

The appearance of the rod is just the 
same as before, the weight has not been 
increased a quarter of an ounce, and the 
rod is good for any kind of exposure. I 
use mine in salt water without having any 
trouble with rusting. 

The Revolution bait also can not be 
praised too highly. In order to see how it 
worked mechanically, I threw it out from 
shore about 10 feet and slowly drew it in. 
The result so startled me that I jerked the 
bait out of water and over my shoulder, as 
a bass struck at it with a tremendous 
splash. A second cast immediately hooked 
my fish. My experience since that first trial 
convinces me that if a bass is in sight of 
the bait he will strike at it. It is just right 
in weight for casting with the Bristol rod. 
R. R. Raymond, Montgomery, Ala. 



INDIAN 

CURIOS 

'Wholesale & Retail 
Curio Dealers' 
Supply Depot. 
Bead Work, Baskets. Elk Teeth, Mexican 
Goods, Fossils, Minerals, Arrow- Heads, 
Pottery, Alaska Ivories, Shells, Agates, 
Photos, Great stock, Big Cata. 5c, stamps. 
Mention Recreation. If a dealer, say so . 
L. W. STILWELL 

PMWQQD , , , t §0,PARQT£ 





RECREATION. 



xlvii 




LATEST, SAFEST AND BEST CANVAS BOAT 




Is what we ofler you. A Boat built on modern lines that will 
prove a pleasure to own and use. Selected materials used 
throughout, and it comes to you guaranteed the best. A handy 
and safe boat for fishing and shooting. Send 4 cents in stamps 
for catalogue and reliable testimonials. 

Mention Recreation. 

LIFE SAVING FOLDING CANVAS BOAT CO. 

Kalamazoo, Mich* 




Latest patent and improved Canvas Folding Boat on the 
Market. Puncture proof. Tempered steel frame. No bolts 
to remove. Folds most compact of any boat made. 




THE HILDEBRANDT SPINNER 

For Fly Fishermen. A 
spinner which spins, and 
also catches fish. Strictly 
hand-made and of the 
best material. No swivel 
required. Made with 
all kinds of Feather and 
Buck-tail flies. For sale by dealers. Sent on receipt of 25c. 

J. J. HILDEBRANDT, Logansport, Ind. 



For Sale: Smith & Wesson revolver, 44 
Russian caliber, 6 inch barrel. 

4x5 Pony Premo, No. 5. Both good as 
new. For particulars write J. P. Allen, Jr., 
Greencastle, Ind. 



f Points on AnOlmg 



More complete than ever before 

The Habits and 
Haunts of 

GAME FISH 

and How to Catch Them 

Mailed free on application 

THE SPECIALTY riFQ. COHPANY 
Box 62a, Goshen, Indiana 



flARINE GAS ENGINES 

Experts for years have ranked our engines with the highest 
grade, and it is now being copied by other builders. We al- 
ways endeavor to be on top and for 1903 offer an engine built 
from brand new patterns, with .NEW and ORIGINAL 
features — just what other engines will have five years hence. 

If you want to be in the lead send for catalog fully describ- 
ing all parts, and then buy a " Rochester " . 

ROCHESTER GAS ENGINE CO. 

700 Driving Park Aye. Rochester, N. Y., U. S. A. 



Wanted — Close range photos of wild 
birds, mammals and reptiles in Nature (the 
commonest species of the Eastern U. S. ex- 
cluded). Good prices for satisfactory pic- 
tures. Abbott H. Thayer, Monadnock, N. H. 




Here is what vou need. A powerful, compact 
Electric Flashlight to carry in the pocket. 

The hardest storm cannot blow out this light. 

Just press the button and you have it instantly 
without noise or delay. Brilliantly lights up 
hollow tree, burrow or cave. 

Safe in the stable or hay loft where lamp or 
candle would be dangerous. Never out of order. 

Price, $2.00. Good for 5,000 flashes; then a 
new battery for 30 cents. Send for Catalogue. 

American Electrical Novelty and Mfg. Co« 

»ept. A— Hudson & Spring Sts., NEW VORK 

Dept. H— Masonic Temple, CHICAGO 



xlviii 



RECREATION. 



Mullins' Metal Boats 





ILLARD STEEL LAUNCHES, 



"Get There" Duck Boat in use. Be sure and order 
one for your Fall shoot. Approved by sportsmen wherever 
used. Send for catalogue } with prices, etc. 

Mention Recreation. 



AND PLEASURE BOATS, 
ARE EVERLASTING! 

Safer than wood; have greater carrying capacity i 
always dry; no bolts or nails to rust. 




Boat Liveries equipped with the Bullard Steel Boats. 
Always have dry boats, that last a lifetime. 

STEEL BOATS CHEAPER THAN WOOD* 




"PRINCE.'' 14 ft., square stern model. Especially 
adapted for family and livery use. 

$30 crated on cars, Salem. 

W. H. MULLINS 

228 Depot St. Salem, Ohio 

For Sale : — Winchester 'Repeating 
Rifle, Model '94, 30-30, with Lyman sights, 
and complete reloading set Ideal tools, for 
30-30 Short-range, Kephart bullet. Out- 
fit in fine condition. Thos. Branch, Jr., 
Pine Grove Furnace, Cumb. Co., Pa. 




THE OSGOOD FOLDING CANVAS BOATS 



Original Canvas Boat; made for 30 years. Sold all 
over the world; used by U. S. Government; best Fish- 
ing and Hunting is where there are no boats, take one 
with you in trunk or bag. Non-puncturable. Folded 
or extended in one minute. 

Send for catalogue illustrating all improved pop- 
ular designs of Steel, Wood, and Canvas Boats, and 
Marine Engines. 

MICHIGAN CONSOLIDATED BOAT GO., LTD. 
55 Main St., Battle Creek, Mich. 



For Sale: New 30-30 Winchester car- 
bine. Half magazine, shot gun, butt stock. 
Perfect condition, with cleaning tools, 40 
cartridges. $12. No trades. Charles T. 
Campbell, Englevale, North Dakota. 




THE above cut shows our INDEPENDENT EVEN SPOOLING DEVICE that level winds your 
line on the spool of the reel, and also shows our SPRING LOCK HOOK SHIELD that muzzles and 
locks to the pole that dangling hook when not in use. We also make the Lightning Fish Scaler. Our prices 
are quoted in April, May and June numbers of Recreation. 

Descriptive Catalog free on request. Mention Recreation. 



A. W. BISHOP & SON, 



Racine, Wis. 




ACME FOLDING BOAT CO., MIAMlSBCltU. O. 



Send, for catalogue of our full line of Folding 
Canvas Boats and Canoes, which have been 
adopted by Governments of United States, 
Canada and. England. Just filled an order for 
Received medal and award at Chicago World's 

Mention Recreation. 



U. S. Government who prefer our boats. 

Fair. ^If you investigate we will get your order. 

Acme Folding Boat Company, Miamisb\irg, O 



TUTTLE 



STREET CANASTOTA. 



[Break spark GASOLINE ENGINES &i-AUNGHES.J UMP spark 



RECREATION. 



xlix 




li=foot Special 
Folding Canvas Boats were not satisfactory 
until the King was produced. It's a revelation 

in boat construction Nothing like it ever made. 
Nonsinkable. Can't tip over. Puncture^ 
proof. Wear longer than a wooden boat- No 
repairs. No cost for storage. Always ready. 

Folds into a small neat package, — carry by hand. 

Used by the U. S. Navy. They are simply won- 
derful. A thoroughly patented article. Beware of 
imitation. Made only by ourselves. 

A catalogue of 70 engravings and 350 testimonials 
sent on receipt of 6 cents. 
Mention Recreation. 

King Folding Canvas Boat Co. 

Kalamazoo. Mich., U. 5. A. 



To 

Amateur 
Photographers 

Here is a Chance to Get a 
FINE CAMERA EASILY 

A 4x5 Tourist Hawk-eye film camera listing 
at $8, for 5 yearly subscriptions to RECREATION. 
A No. 3 folding Weno Hawk-eye film camera, 
listed at $15, for 10 yearly subscriptions to 
RECREATION. - 

These are both neat, compact, well made and 
handsomely finished cameras, capable of doing 
high-class work. 

Sample copies for use in canvas- 
sing furnished on request. 

Address RECREATION, 
23 West 24th St. New Yotk City. 



RUSHTON 
CANOES 



Cannot be Beat 







Indian Girl r ^ m i5 » I6 ' 17 » lS 
Model %km^ Fe©t 

Northern White Cedar, Canvas Cov- 
ered. $30 to $43 

"There is a pleasure in the pathless woods" — 
but it is second, in the minds of many men, to 
that found on the smooth surface of lake and 
river, when fishing, hunting or idling in a 
staunch, swift, graceful Rushton-built canoe. 

29 years' experience goes into every one that 
I turn out, and guarantees the quality. 

Have you secured one for your vacation? 

Write for my complete catalogue of pleasure 
boats, canoes and fittings — sent FREE. 

J. H. RUSHTON, 817 Water St., Canton, N.Y. 





Motors & 

Launches 

Operated by 

Gasoline Vapor 

Motors Wz to 25 H.P, 



THE Fay & Bowen Marine Motor is a revela- 
tion to those who have used others. Reli- 
able, safe, durable and easy to operate. 
Remarkable speed control. Best of all, it starts 
when you start it. No handle or crank is used. 
Our patent igniter is absolutely unique and al- 
ways instant and positive in action. It is really 
the only perfect and satisfactory igniter. 

Motors complete from x% to 25 H. P. ready 
for installation. We also build handsome 
launches with motors installed and ready to run 
Sendfor Catalogue. 

Fay & Bowen, 

28 Mill Street, Auburn, N. Y. 



RECREATION. 




Yankee Cork Puller 



Yanks the cork from any bottle as quick as you can move your 
hand up and down. Leaves the bottle clean and free from broken 
bits of cork. Never breaks the bottle. Don't let your wife or servant 
run the risk of blood poisoning by cutting their hands on a bottle 
broken with an ordinary corkscrew. The Yankee lasts a lifetime, 
fastens against the refrigerator, door jamb or any upright surface, 
and is always in place, and costs but 

$1.25 Nickel Placed ¥* XI -«r OnP Mnw 
$3,50 Silver Plated -D^Y V/Iie i^OW 

May be returned after thirty days trial and money back if not 
)leased. If your Hardware Dealer hasn't it, write us. 

THE GILCHRIST CO., 125 Lafayette Street, Newark, N. J. 




To Recreation Readers : I am or- 
ganizing a club of subscribers for Recrea- 
tion, with a view to securing a premium, 
and I submit this offer; to each person 
sending me $i for yearly subscription to 
Recreation, I will send a 25c. Dominion 
of Canada bank note. There are but a few 
of these in circulation and I have suc- 
ceeded in collecting a number of them. 
These are interesting souvenirs and are 
especially valuable to persons who are 
making collections of coins or other curios. 
Walter Legare, 518 John St., Quebec, Can. 



One 



DURYEA 



No bewildering array of levers, gauges or other intricacies- 
one hand does it all. A twist of the wrist not only steers it, 
but accelerates or retards the pace from a position of luxuri- 
ousease. THE DURYEA PHAETON is the acme of 
motor carriage perfection. Its long springs and large wheels 
obviate all jar and give greatest possible comfort. No ma- 
chinery in front to annoy passengers by odor, or in sight to 
mar appearance. The result of twelve years' experience of 
the oldest motor vehicle builders in America. Triple Gaso- 
lene Motors. Speed up to 40 miles per hour. Fuel for 100 
mile run. Large bronze bearings. 

Duryea vehicles are most durable and economical in fuel 
and tires of any built. lVo pumps, no trouble. 

Puryea's excel under all conditions. 

Fastest American gasolene carriage, Nelson HilF, 
1901; won Chicago 
Times -Herald 50 
mile race through 
more than a foot 
ofsnow,andother 
races in Europe 
and America. 
They lead the 
way today. 

Send for cata- 
logue of the eight, 
styles— also book- 
lets. They will 
interest you. 

DURYEA POWER CO., 314 Hockley St., Reading, Pa. 




m 



[ Another Good Offer : To the first person 
'sending me five subscriptions to Recrea- 
tion and five dollars, before April 1st, I 
will give a 2 by 3J4 printing press, and 
type to go with it. To any person send- 
ing me two subscriptions and two dollars 
I will give a silver-plated napkin ring. To 
any person sending one subscription, I will 
give a sterling silver ring. All persons 
sending me one subscription, please send 
finger measurement. A. J. Brodhead, 

42 Sayre St., Elizabeth, N. J. 



El Paso, Texas. 
The Peters Cartridge Co., 

Cincinnati, Ohio : 

Dear Sirs : — I see in May Recreation 
that you have canceled your ad in that 
magazine. You have done wrong. Mr. 
Shields should not be held responsible 
for the opinion of his contributors. I 
have heard experienced sportsmen say 
that the Winchester rifle is inferior to 
others, and so on, but people will continue 
to have their choice in such matters and 
buy the guns and ammunition that suit 
them best. 

All true sportsmen love Mr. Shields for 
the great missionary work he is doing for 
game protection, without which there would 
soon be no use for cartridges, and you 
would have to go out of business. For this 
reason, if for no other, all sportsmen, will 
stay with him, to the financial hurt of you 
or anyone else who makes a fight on him, 
on so flimsy a pretext. I have used your 
cartridges and like them, but there are 
others ; hence I feel it my duty to use 
goods made by men who do not see fit to 
withdraw their ad each time someone criti- 
cises their goods. 

Dr. I. J. Bush. 



Burglar (throwing up his hands) — All 
right, boss, I'll go to th' p'leece station 
wit' ye. 

Suburban Resident — No, you won't ! 
you'll stay and visit with us, We haven't 
had a caller for a month, 



RECREATION. 




Be sure 

steri 



its an 



/• 




fSS^^S 







NGENIOUS imitations of our trade mark abound. Do not 
tolerate the 'just as good" cry of a fraudulent dealer. It's 
not 'felt" if it's not an Ostermoor, so — be sure it's an 
Ostermoor, Our name and trade mark label on the end of every 
genuine mattress. Why not learn about the Ostermoor, even if 
you don't want a mattress now. We have spent thousands of 
dollars to issue our handsome 96-page book, "The Test of Time/' 
handsomely illustrated, which 

We Will Send You Free. 

Each copy costs us 25 cts. to print and 5 cts. in stamps to mail — 
it is yours for your name on a postal. Send to-day. The Ostermoor 
is the best mattress ever made — a glance at the letters in our book 
will prove it — but this guarantee should suffice : 

THIRTY NIGHTS' FREE TRIAL. 

You can have an Ostermoor Mattress, sleep on 
it thirty nights, and if it is not better than any- 
other Mattress you have ever used — if it is not all 
you even HOPED for, return it at our expense and 
your money will be immediately refunded without 
question. What more can we do to convince you ? 

Ostermoor & Co., 114 Elizabeth Street, New York. 

Canadian Agency; The Alaska Feather and Down Co,, Ltd., Montreal. 



STANDARD SIZES AND 


prices : 




2 feet 6 inches -wide, 25 lbs., 


_ _ _ 


$ 8.35 


3 feet wide, - 30 lbs., 
3 feet 6 inches -wide, 35 lbs., 


_ . _ 


10.00 


- 


11.70 


4 feet -wide, - 40 lbs., 
4 feet 6 inches wide, 45 lbs., 


_ 


13.35 


_ 


15.00 


All 6 feet 3 inches long. 




In two parts 50c. extra. Special sizes, special prices. 


Express charges prepaid to 


any place. 





Ill 



RECREATION. 



For Shot Guns 



USE: 



* 



o 



X> 



\ n /£ 



o 



o 



9> 



IT LEADS THEM ALL 




SMOKELESS 

Fair and impartial comparative tests will convince 
you of these facts. Write for Powder Facts. 
Mention Recreation. 

The Robin Hood Powder Co. 

Swanton, Vt. 

TOO STRAIGHT 

Amateurs as well as Experts make 
and break records with 

DuPonf Smokeless 

At Baltimore, Md., June 3d, Mr. 
Howard D. Jackson won the county 
amateur championship of Mary- 
land. He broke 100 straight, using 
38 grains of DuPont Smokeless, 
\% oz. iYz chilled shot. 

IOO STRAIGHT 



KOENIG'S SHELL EXTRACTOR. 

Every shooter should 

have one — carry it in a 

vest pocket. Fits any 

gauge shell. Koenig's 

lOCts. Postpaid Gun Catalogue, Free. 

E.G.KOENIG, NEW JERSTy's LARGEST GUN HOUSE 
SOUTH BROAD ST., NEWARK, IN J, 




THE BRADLEY SHOT GUN SIGHT 

Wing Shooting is 
made easy and cer- 
tain by using this gun 
sight. Scores at trap 
and in field greatly 
increased by its use. 
Right and left birds 
are bagefed as easily 
as straight-awav birds. Price SO Cents, Postpaid. 
% C. L. BRADLEY Inventor, Clarksville, Tenn. 




bOME GOOD GUIDES. 
Following are names and addresses of guides 
who have been recommended to me, by men 
who have employed them; together with data 
as to the species of game and fish which these 
guides undertake to find for sportsmen. 

If anyone who may employ one of these 
guides should find him incompetent or un- 
satisfactory, I will be grateful if he will report 
the lact to me. 

ALASKA. 
Edwin Edelmann, Kenai, Cook's Inlet, moose, 
bear, caribou, mountain sheep, ducks, grouse 
and trout. 

FLORIDA. 
Carson Bros., Frostproof, bear, deer, turkeys, quail, 

snipe. 
C. H. Stokes, Mohawk, deer, alligators, turkey, 
quail, and snipe. 

IDAHO. 
John Ching, Kilgore, elk, bear, deer, antelope, 

mountain sheep, trout and grouse. 
Chas. Petty's, Kilgore, ditto. 

MAINE. 
H. R. Horton, Flagstaff, deer, bear, moose, cari- 
bou, fox, grouse and trout. 
W. C. Holt, Hanover, mocse. caribou, deer, grouse and 
trout. 

MONTANA. 

A. R. Hague, Fridley, elk, deer, mountain sheep, 
bear, grouse and trout. 

Chas. Marble, Chestnut, ditto. 
NEW YORK. 
Le Roy Still, Bayport, Long Island, ducks, quails, 
rabbits and grouse. 

WASHINGTON. 
Munro Wyckoff, Port Townsend, deer, bear and 
grouse, 

WYOMING. 
S. N. Leek, Jackson, elk, bear, deer, mountain 

sheep, antelope, grouse and trout. 
James L. McLaughlin, Valley, elk, bear, deer, 
mountain sheep, antelope, grouse and trout. 
CANADA. 
VVm. S. Andrews, Lillooet, B. C, deer, bear, 

mountain sheep, goats, grouse and trout. 
B. Norrad, Boiestown, N. B., moose, caribou, 

grouse and trout. 
Carl Bersing, Newcastle, N. B., moose, caribou, 
deer, bear and grouse. 

NEWFOUNDLAND. 
John C. LeMoine, Birchy Cove, Bay of Islands, caribou 
salmon and trout. 

Big Ga>me Hunters 

FISHING AND OUTING PARTIES 

Before planning trips other than in New Brunswi. k, 
should apply to 

The New Brunswick Guides Association 

Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada, 

for information. The Association comprises the leading 
and most reliable guides in the Province. 

Hunting Map of New Brunswick 

Showing rivers, lakes, portage roads, car- 
ries, etc. Scale, \y z miles to the inch, and 
folded to suit pocket. Mailed to any address 
on receipt of price, $1.50. Checks accepted. 
FRANK WHITEHEAD, 
Fredericton, New Brunswick, 
P.O.Box 30^ Canada. 

Dealer in Fancy Gro- 
ceries, etc. Sportsmen's 
== Provisions a specialty. 
Only the best quality goods kept in stock. Prices on 
application. Public Square, Newcastle on the 
Miramichi, NEW BRUNSWICK. 

For Exchange : Side Companion Bi- 
cycle ; far superior to tandem. Fine order; 
Frost gear cases ; cost $160; exchange for 
light hammerless gun. 

W. P. CORBETT, 
302 Park Place, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



George Stables 



RECREATION. 



llll 



; Tlie Busy Man's Train." 



Appropriate in its Name, 

Appropriate in its Route, . 

Appropriate in its Character 



n 



The 20th Century Limited," 



This is The century of all the ages. 

The New York Central's 20-hour 
train between New York and Chicago 
(the two great commercial centers of 
America) is The train of the century, 
and is appropriately named 



"The 20th Century Limited. 



if 



A copy of "America's Summer Resorts," will be sent 
free, postpaid on receipt of a postage stamp by George 
H. Daniels, General Passenger Agent, New York Cen- 
tral & Hudson River Railroad, Grand Central Station, 
New York. 



Saratoga Springs, Lake George, Lake 
Champlain, the Adirondack Moun- 
tains, At* Sable Chasm, Sharon 
Springs 

and many other cool, healthful Summer resorts in the 
elevated region of Northern New York, are described and 
illustrated in 

"A SUMMER PARADISE" 

a handbook of the Northern Tour just issued by the 

DELAWARE & HUDSON RAILROAD, the Shortest, 

Quickest and Best line between New York and Montreal. 

Mailed to any address on receipt of 4 cents postage. 

J. W. BURDICK, Cxen. Pass. Agt., 

Albany, N. Y. 



Do You Want a Drinking Cup Free- 

Send me $1 for a new subscription to Rec- 
reation and I will send you a fine nickel- 
plated folding drinking cup. For to cents 
extra will send by registered mail. Mrs. 
Thomas H. Walker, 295 Merrimac Street, 
Manchester, N. H. 




4 ~ SEND 

J OC- FOR 
IT 

"Haunts of the Hunted" 

Published by the 

r & HraostooK 1. s. 



Entirely new Guide book for 7003, 
descriptive of Northern Maine. 
Book of 200 pages, finely illust- 
rated by more than too half-tone 
cuts and with two full pages 
in colors. Write to Dept. H 
and enclose 10 cents in stamps. 



GEO. M. HOUGHTON, 

Traffic Manager 
BANGOR, ME. 



ADIRONDACKS 
Camp Mohawk and Cottages 

Fourth Lake of the Fulton Chain Patronized largely by 
families and parties of friends. Two handsome new cot 
tages have been added this spring, which have very large 
rooms, fireplaces and baths. Write for booklet. Mention 
Recreation. 

HRS. H. H. LONGSTAFF, Old Forge, N.Y. 

IN THE ADIRONDACKS 

Indian Lsike House 

Hountain View, N. Y. 

C.C. Mprgan, Prop. All the Year 

All passenger trains on A. & Sf. L. R . R. will be met by boat 
aud 'bus. Passengers conveyed direct! y to the bouse. 



Rates. $2 per Day. 



Special Rates to Parties 



Best DEER HUNTING and TROUT FISHING to be found 
in the Ajiiondacks 

I would like to correspond with a few 

Sportsmen relative to unexplored regions. 

Beautiful undisturbed Nature, pure air, 

pure water, big game, big fish, trout and 

muskalonge. One day's paddle from 

railroad. E. C. TRIPP, 

Atikokan, Ontario, Canada, Seine River Dist. 



BEST FISHING At OUTLET HOUSE 

AND 



FINE HUNTING 



(Formerly Moosehead House), MOOSEHEAD, ME. 11 miles from Green- 
ville by C. P. R. R. or by Steamer. 

CHARLES. E. WILSON = Propr. 

New steamboatj ust bought to accommodate our guests. 
Earliest and latest Moosehead lake fishing is had here; also plenty of big game. House has been entirely refurnished ; 
rooms have hot and cold water and baths. Grounds nicely graded, tennis court, croquet grounds and many fine 
woods roads laid out. Fishermen can avoid expense of guide by coming here, although we furnish guides, boats and 
canoes when desired. Several camps in our " string," all snug and attractive. Rates $2.00 to $2.50 per day. De- 
scriptive Booklet sent ree. 



liv RECREATION. 



ANOTHER GREAT OFFER 

TO AMATEUR 
PHOTOGRAPHE 



A 4x5 SERIES 1 KORONA CAMERA 

LISTED AT $ia, FOR 8 YEARLY SUBSCRIPTIONS TO RECREATION; 

A 5x7 SERIES 1 KORONA CAMERA 

LISTED AT $16, FOR 12 YEARLY SUBSCRIPTIONS; 

A 4x5 SERIES 2 KORONA CAMERA 

LISTED AT $18, FOR 14 YEARLY SUBSCRIPTIONS; 

A 4x5 SERIES 3 KORONA CAMERA 

LISTED AT $22, FOR 18 YEARLY SUBSCRIPTIONS; 

A 4x5 SERIES 4 KORONA CAMERA 

LISTED AT $25, FOR 20 YEARLY SUBSCRIPTIONS; 

A 4x5 SERIES 5 KORONA CAMERA 

LISTED AT $35, FOR 30 YEARLY SUBSCRIPTIONS. 

SAMPLE COPIES, FOR USE IN CANVASSING, 
FURNISHED FREE. 

ADDRESS 

RECRE ATION 

23 WEST 24.TH STREET, NEW YORK CITY 



RECREATION. 



Iv 



There is ECONOMY and PLEASURE 

in Loading and Re-Loading your own 
Shot Gun Shells if you have the proper 
implements. There is an entire line of 

NEW TOOLS UP TO DATE 

for this purpose Now Ready. Full descrip- 
tion and prices of all will be found in our new 
booklet entitled "Hints on Loading and 
Reloading Shot Gun Shells/' which will 
be sent to any address upon application to 
IDEAL MANUF'6 CO., 12 U St., New Haven, Conn., U. S. A. 

THE PHIL. B. BEKEART CO., of San Francisco, Cal., Agents for Pacific Coast. 

When you write please mention Recreation. 





Free : To anyone sending, through me, 
$i for yearly subscription to Recreation, I 
will send free a No. i Sportsman's Medicine 
Case ; for 2 subscriptions a Physician's 
Pocket Medicine Case; for 10 subscriptions 
1,000 12-gauge primed paper shot shells. 
This offer is not open to old subscribers who 
formerly have sent in their subscriptions to 
the office of Recreation, but to all others. 
Walter Lusson, Ardmore, Pa. 



MEXICAN OPAL AND SOMBRERO 
FREE WITH EACH SUBSCRIP- 
TION TO RECREATION. 

To anyone subscribing to Recreation 
through me, I will send free a beautiful 
genuine Mexican Opal as large as a pea, 
together with a miniature Mexican Som- 
brero, /nade of silver and horsehair beau- 
tifully dyed. Arthur Thomson, Box 332, 
San Antonio, Texas. 



WANTED 

Every owner of a shot gun to learn all about our handy little 

Target Trap. 

A Card Brings the Information 



Mention Recreation. 



THE MITCHELL MFG. CO., London, Ohio 



lvi 



RECREATION. 



-ITHACA CUNS" 

CROSS BOLTED 



X 



THE DOUBLE THICK 
IMITRO BREECH. 




THE NARROW SKELETON RIB 

TAPERING GRACEFULLY 

TO TH t MUZZLE. 



> 




O 

c 



16 GRADES $19.50 TO $300 



c 



ITHACA GUN CO., ithho, new vobk 

CftlTHACA CUNSo) 





Newhouse Traps 




THE STANDARD FOR OVER FIFTY YEARS 

Used by all professional hunters and trappers, 
who find that 

The Best Trap is the Cheapest 

Complete illustrated catalogue on 
application. 

ONEIDA COMMUNITY, LTD., Kenwood, N. Y. 



Waterproof 

LEATHER 

DRESSING 

-■'/ 'AND' ■ 

RUST 

PREVENTER 



Dept, 



"Collan-Oil" 

preserves leather and 
renders shoes and 
harness positively 

WATERPROOF 

Used by the U. S. 
the Army and Navy, 
and National Guard. 

Send 25c. for trial can. 
AGENTS WANTED 
Write for terms and circulars 

J. R. BUCKELEW 
A - \\\ Chambers St., N. Y. 



THE BAKER 



THE GUN 
THAT'S SAFE 



SO DURABLE TOO 

IT LA5TS A 

LIFETIME 




If you want to be right up in the front rank of style and efficiency shoot one of our 
Special Paragons with Whit-worth or Krupp fluid steel barrels. We have other patterns 
also that would please you. Our "Quarterly" tells about them and other matters that 
would interest you. We will send it to you free a year if you want it. 

BAKER QUN & FORQINQ CO., 42 Liberty Street, Batavia, N, Y. 



RECREATION. 



lvii 



ALIGHT? 



G 



Every sportsman knows the value of dry 
matches. They're always a comfort; 
sometimes they save lives. 

THE DECDEATION 
WATEBPBOOF MATCHBOX 

is the only waterproof matchbox ever offered 
sportsmen which is worth pocket room. 

It is substantially made from brass, heavily 
nickeled, and holds enough matches to keep a 
man in smokes and fires for several days. 

■ riCC Ovl CerllSa everywhere, or 

Marble Safety Axe Co., Gladstone, Mich. 



Marble's Safety Pocket Axes. 
Marble 's Automatic Gaff Hook. 
Marble's Compass and Bracket. 
Marble's Ideal Hunting Knife. 



Send for 
Catalogue A 

FREE 



«iw^Wfflff glT^r lglp! ^g 



Shows 
box ' 

:losed 



Eg* E.KOTEQBP-CWICA0QI 



Practical Common Sense 
in 6 Sizes. 



CAMP 
STOVE 

Either with or 
without oven. The 
lightest, strongest, 
most compact, prac- 
tical stove made. 
Cast combination 
sheet steel top, 
smooth outside, 
heavy lining in fire 
Dox and around oven, holds its shape, telescopic pipe 
carried inside the stove. Burns lareer wood and keeps 
are longer than any other. Used by over 9,000 campers 
and only one stove letumed. 

For catalogue giving lull particulars, mention Rec- 
reation and address, 

D. W. CREE, Manufacturer, Griggsville, III. 









«■' 



A few days ago the newspapers told the story of the 
discovery of the skeleton of a man— evidently a hunter— 
who perished in a hand to hand fight with a bear because 
his hunting knife broke. 

Marble's Safety Pocket Knife 

cannot break. It is hand forged from the best selected 
steel. Folds when not in use, yet locks perfectly rigid when 
open— not a toy, but a knife to stake a life on. Price $4.00 
from all dealers or direct from the manufacturers. 
Send for catalogue A. 
MARBLE SAFETY AXE CO., GLADSTONE, MICH. 




T902 Model 

LEATHER -COVERED Pneu- 
matic Recoil Pad is now per- 
fect. No pump, no valve, no 
recoil, no flinch, no headache, 
no bruised shoulders, no 
money if not satisfactory and 
returned at once. PRICE$2. 

J. R. WINTERS 
Clinton, Mo. 



THE 



PARKER 

AUTOMATIC 
EJECTOR 




The Latest attachment to 

The "OLD 
RELIABLE" 



New York Salesroom, Send for Catalogue. PARKER BROS., 
32 WARREN ST, Mention Recreation. Meriden, Conn. 



lviii 



RECREATION. 



H. <& R. 

"Bicycle 

Hammerless" 

Revolver 




Description 

32 Caliber, 5 shot. 2 Inch Barrel. Weight, 12 ounces. 
C. F., S. & W. Cartridge. Finish, Nickel or Blue. 

IMPOSSIBLE TO CATCH on the pocket and discharge accidentally. 
ABSOLUTELY SAFE. Although designed for cyclists, this revolver 
is equeJly adapted to all causes where a small, light weight, effective 
and handy pocket weapon is desired* It has small frame and auto= 
mafic ejector. Sold direct where dealers will not supply. 



HADDINGTON & RICHARDSON ADMS CO. 

Makers of H. & R. SINGLE GUNS 

WORCESTER., MASS. 



■ Dept R 



Charles Daly Rifle \ Shotgun 




\bbi 



Responding to an increased demand for a Combined Rifle and Shotgun of a 
finer quality than is usually offered, we have decided to place on the market a 
Charles Daly Rifle and Shotgun. This gun is made with the same care 
and of the same quality as all our Daly guns, and the sportsman buying one of 
them can feel that he has the best that money can buy of this particular kind 
of firearm. The gun has graceful lines and is beautifully balanced. It has top- 
snap action, rebounding bar locks, matted doll's head extension rib, Krupp's steel 
barrels, properly sighted for absolutely perfect rifle shooting and the shotgun 
is bored for field and game shooting. 

No. 50 — 12 gauge shotgun barrel, 30/30 or 38/55 rifle barrel, 28 inches long, 
weight 7^ to 8 pounds. PRICE, $50. 

SCHOVERLING, DALY & GALES 

302=304 Broadway, New York 






RECREATION. 



Hx 



" HOPKINS & ALLEN " 

Single Barrel Shot Guns 

(Made for any powder and good for any shot.) 




Our " Lever Action " has more friends than any single gun made, has stood the 
test of fifteen years' continued approval. Simple, durable and reliable, 
12 and 16 gauge blued steel barrel $8.00 




Our new model top snap action, combining all up-to-date features of a modern 
gun, including patent compensating snap fore end. Automatic shell 
ejector, F\ill Choke Bored. 12, 16 and 20 gauge decarbonized 

steel barrel $9.00 

B 12 and 16 gauge Stubbs twist steel barrel $10.00 

I We will ship, all charges prepaid, on receipt of remittance 

1 _ 



The Hopkins & Allen Arms Co., 

NORWICH, CONN., U. S. A. 



k 



RECREATION. 




SALE 



500 Guns At Reduced Prices 



GREAT 



Bargains in Fine Guns 

By a fire in our Warerooms on June 9th a part of our stock of Fine Guns 
and Sportsmen's Goods was partially damaged by water, and we shall close 
them out at greatly reduced prices to make quick sale. 

W. C. Scott & Sons, Premier and other grades — Greener, Langs, 
Parkers, Remington, Ithaca, and all the leading makes. 

Also other articles in Sportsmen's Goods, Athletic Goods, Bicycles, 
Cutlery, etc. 

Hi^Send two stamps for List of Guns, showing sizes, etc. 

fgg^ The Chance of the Year ^^$ 

ILLIAM READ & SONS 



107 Washington St., Boston, flass. 



ESTABLISHED 1826 



I had ? delightful trip down the Kissim- 
mee last winter, thanks in no small degree 
to you. The Mullins galvanized steel canoe 
and Get There boat, used by a friend and 
me, were so good that I recommend them 
to anyone in search of light, dry boats 
which will stand hard usage. Anyone who 
contemplates a camping trip will be doing 
himself an injury if he should fail to corre- 
spond with Abercrombie & Fitch. We 
used one of their special waterproof tents, 
folding aluminum bakers, knockdown fry 
pans, and last but not least, one of their 
waterproof canvas buckets, which is one of 
the handiest things a camper ever got his 



claws on. You can leave it filled with 
water a week, and it refuses to leak. At 
the mouth of the Hole in the Wall, on the 
Kissimmee river, we met 2 New York men, 
in the most beautiful canoe I ever saw. It 
was built by Rushton, another of Recrea- 
tion's patrons. I must also shout a few 
in praise of the Bristol steel rod. With 
the one you gave me I captured a catfish 
S3 inches long. I was fast to him nearly 
an hour, and in that time learned to love 
the little rod. I advise anyone seeking cat- 
fish to hie him to the Kissimmee. 

C. O. Moseley, Lytle, Ga. 



We make a specialty of Featherweights 

and Trap Guns with our new 

SINGLE TRIGGER 




Mention Recreation 

D. M. LEFEVER SONS & 

Manufacturers of the "NEW LEFEVER" 
Not connected with Lefever Arms Co. SYRACUSE, N« Y. 



Guaranteed 
Perfect 

Our New 
Perfect 
Gun Cleaner 
By Mail, 
30 Cents 



RECREATION. 



T\x\ 



Guaranteed to Shoot ANY Nitro Powder and 



Any 
One of the 



NOT GET LOOSE 



9 



ii 



SYRACUSE 

Built for Business. 



JJ 



Whether Grade ** OO " 

listing at $30.00 

or 

Grade " D » 

listing at $475.00. 



A Masterpiece 

by 

Master Craftsmen 




ARE BUILT 

10 GAUGE BARRELS on a 10 GAUGE FRAME 
12 GAUGE BARRELS on a 12 GAUGE FRAME 
16 GAUGE BARRELS on a 16 GAUGE FRAME 
20 GAUGE BARRELS on a 20 GAUGE FRAME 

Bray Wheels and Sulky Body Z^tlt ^oTr m a b t a T^ 



V. 



SYRACUSE CATS 

TELL 

THE 

STORY. 

TgMpBMHU l semaaas**Kxr*MM 



SYRACUSE 
ARMS CO. 



SYRACUSE. N. Y. 



Mention Recreation. 



Ixii 



RECREATION. 



THE 
WORLDS 
h^T/INDARD 




Putman Boots 




Go on like a glove^^fit all over 



^S> 



For a Quarter of a Century Putman Boots have been the Stand- 
ard among Western Hunters, Prospectors, Ranchmen and Engineers (who 
demand the best) and we have learned through our personal contact 
with them how to make a perfect boot. 

Putman Boots are in use in nearly every civilized country in the 
World. They are Genuine Hand Sewed, Water proof, Made to measure, 
Delivery charges prepaid, and cost no more than others. Send for Cat- 
alogue of over 30 different styles of boots. Also Indian Tanned 
Moosehide Moccasins. We send with catalogue Order Blanks show- 
ing how to measure your foot. We have in our files thousands of letters similar to the following. 

Gentlemen: — Please send me another cat- 
alogue. We are all wearing Putman Boots and 
find them far superior to any other boot. I have 
ordered about 20 pairs for friends here during 
the past three years, and every pair has given 
perfect satisfaction, and I feel that I have done 
a man a favor when I have recommended your 
goods to him. Respectfully, 

W. H. Fluker, Gen. Mgr, 

(Columbia Mining Co.) 

Tatham, Ga. 

Gentlemen: — I have just returned from a 
duck hunt in Colleton Co. this state, and though 
I tramped through the marshes for six days and 
a part of the nights , sinking in mud and water 
nearly to the tops of the shoes I got from you, 
my feet kept dry throughout the trip and the 
shoes were as soft at the wind-up as at the be- 
gining. I can cheerfully recommend yourshoes 
to all sportsmen. Yours respectfully, 
C. F. Dill, 

Greenville, S. C. 

Gentlemen :— Was fishing through the 
ice on the Flathead River this week stand- 
ing for hours in wet snow and slush and 
tramping through the mountains, and I 
found the boots you built for me in De- 
cember to be thoroughly water and snow 
proof, and quite warm. Yours truly. 

L. R. Fogle, Great falls, Mont. 

Illustration shows 
No. 900, 14 inch 
Boot, made to mea- 
sure and delivered 
in U. S. for 




H. J. PUTMAN & CO., 



3« HENNEPIN 
AVE. 



$7.50. 



Minneapolis. Minn. 






I 



^^ 






% % A f J"^f\ 



§gp« 






Summer 

Time 

Satisfaction 

When cooking is a drudgery and the 
appetite craves cool, refreshing dishes 
— dainty, toothsome foods — at home or 
for picnic outings — you will find 

Libby's (Natural Flavor) Food Products 

^^ftdelicious meats to serve on any occasion. For picnic luncheons 
Libby's Melrose Pate, Veal Loaf, Peerless Dried Belf, Ox Ton™ 
Chicken and Luncheon Loaf stand supreme tongue, 

The fcooUet, «^ow to Ma.e Good TMn, to Eat" sent free. Send fiTe * ata.ps for Ub^M B ig At.as of the World 

Libby, McNeill & Libby 

CHicago 



CHARLES FRANCiS PRESS, NEW YORK 






o 

> 



o 




RIFLES 



HE new high power 25-35, 32-40 and 
38-55 calibers have recently been added 
to the famous 303 or 3030 Model 1899 Re- 
peater. If you hunt large or small game 
these sizes will interest you. 

Catalog G on Request. 



Savage Arms Company 
Utica, N. Y., U. S. A. 

BAKER & HAMILTON, Pacific Coast 
Age?its, San Francisco and Sacramento, Cal. 



KITCHEN MONEY 

$7,500.00 Donated 

To Be Divided Among 
Family Cooks 

Great numbers of ladies have requested 
an extension of time on this contest. It 
has been granted; full particulars by mail. 
See below. 

The sum of $7,500.00 will be distributed 
between now and fall among family cooks, 
in 735 prizes, ranging from $200.00 to $5.00. 

This is done to stimulate better cooking 
in the family kitchen. The contest is open 
to paid cooks (drop the name "hired girl," 
call them cooks if they deserve it) or to the 
mistress of the household if she does the 
cooking. The rules ior contest are plain 
and simple. Each of the 735 winners of 
money prizes will als^ ^receive an engraved 
certificate of merit J. ' diploma as a cook. 
The diplomas bear the big gilt seal and sig- 
nature of the most famous food company in 
the world, the Postum Cereal Co., Ltd., of 
Battle Creek, Mich., the well-known makers 
of Postum Coffee and Grape-Nuts. Write 
them and address Cookery Department, No. 
119, for full particulars. 

Great sums of money devoted to such en- 
terprises always result in putting humanity 
further along on the road to civilization, 

U health, comfort and happiness. 



Club 
Cocktails 



Famous the world 
over for purity. 
They never vary. 
The secret of their 
perfect blend is that 
they are kept six 
months before being 
drawn off and bot- 
tled. Be sure you 
have them in your 
camp, on the yacht, 
and on your outing 
trips wherever you 
go. Tney are ready and require no 
mixing. Simply pour over cracked ice. 

For Sale by all Fancy Grocers and Dealers 

Q. F. HEUBLEIN & BRO. 

29 BROADWAY, W. Y. HARTFORD, CONN. 




vose 



PIANOS 



have been established over 50 YEARS. By our IfJ 

tern of payments every family in moderate circ| 
stances can own a VOSE piano. We take old insl 

ments in exchange and deliver the new piano in your home free of expwl 

Write for catalogue D and explanations. 

VOSE & SONS PIANO CO., 160 Boylston St., Boston, Mf| 



VOLUME XVt. 
NUnBER 3 



SEPTEMBER, 1903 



$1.00 A YEAR 
10c. A COPY 




HUNTING ELK IN A WINDFALL; 

By E. B. SHANKS, with lull page drawings by CARL RUNOIUS and H. D. NICHOLS. 



There comes a time in the life of every 
individual when the use of a stimulant 
is not only advisable but necessary 



AS you approach the calm and mellow evening of your life you 
have doubtless learned the value of a pure and wholesome 
cereal stimulant to sweeten solitude and keep off the blues. 

When choosing a stimulant for medicinal use or purpose of good 
cheer endeavor to obtain a mild soothing amiable fluid that does not 
inflame or excite, but gently stirs and quickens the life current. 

REGISTERED AND SPECIAE BRANDS 



Per Gal. 

Holiday Pure Rye - 4.00 

(Eleven Years Old) 

Hermitage Rock & Rye 4.00 

Superior 

Five pounds of rock candy crystals 
to each gallon of seven year old 
Hermitage Rye whiskey, is used in 
the preparation of our Celebrated 
Rock and Rye. 

Bon Ton Cocktails - 4.00 

Martini, Manhattan, Vermouth, 
Whiskey, Tom Gin and Holland 
Gin. Carefully prepared from the 
choicest materials, perfectly blended. 

Ruthven Sherry - 4.00 

From Duff, Gordon & Co. Warranted 
twenty years in the wood before 
bottling. Rich and fruity. 



Per Gal. 

Old Gold Bourbon - $4.00 

(Eleven Years Old) 

Jewel Port - 4.00 

From Silva & Cosens, Oporto. A 
choice product of the grape. 

Rainbow Brandy V.0. 4.00 

The product of one of the best Ameri- 
can Vineyards, with all the medici- 
nal qualities of French Brandy. 

Jupiter Gin - 4.00 

From the Swan Distillery, Schiedam, 
Holland,, where Good Gin comes 
from. Tastes differ. Many people 
appreciate Good Gin. Jupiter is the 
best the world affords. 

Medford Old Rum - 4.00 

From Daniel Lawrence & Sons, Med- 
ford, Mass. 



On receipt of your order with $6.00, we will ship 6 full quarts 

assorted to suit, transportation charges prepaid, to any railroad point 
in the United States where the charges for transportation do not 
exceed $2.00. You cannot afford to let this chance go by. You 
never before had as good an offer. 

If you accept our offer you will surely receive the BEST and the 
HOST for your money that ever came to you from any similar propo- 
sition. 

Remit cash in registered letter or by express company or P. O. 
money order. 

References; Any bank in Boston. Any mercantile agency or 
any distiller of importance in the United States. 

W. H. JONES & CO^Tosm" SS SB " 

ESTABLISHED 185* 



RECREATION 

Copyright, December, 1902, by G. O. Shields 



A Monthly Magazine Devoted to Everything the Name Implies 



:$i.oo A Year. 

10 Cents a Copy. 



G. O. SHIELDS (COQUINA), 
Editor and Manager. 



23 West 24TH Street, 

New York 



CONTENTS OF THIS NUMBER 



PAGE 



He Was Uttering His Weird Call in Tones as Inspiring and as Musical as the Notes 

of a Flute Frontispiece 

Hunting Elk in a Windfall. Illustrated E. B. Shanks 167 

Some Feathered Folk. Illustrated Martha M. Williams 

A Deer Hunt in Mexioo J. K. Eichhorn 

Rafting- on the St. Joe. Illustrated Geo. H. Root 

Catching a Catfish. Illustrated F. D. Greene 

Boh White. Poem Ira Sweet 

Quail Shooting in Kentucky A. S. Atkinson 

A Leaf from the Log of the Rosamond. Illustrated • Chas. Van Brunt, Jr. 

Among the Sandhills John McNeil 

Hadn't Lost Any Bear Boyd C. Packer 



Jock o' the Gun. Poem Dorothy H. Barron 



A Florida Kid on a Camp Hunt. XII 

Our Trophies 

From the Game Fields 197 

Fish and Fishing 206 

Guns and Ammunition 211 

Natural History 217 

The League of Amerioan Sportsmen 223 

Forestry 226 

Entered as Second-Class Matter at New York Post-Office, Oct, 17, 1894. 



171 

175 
177 

181 
18a 
183 
185 
187 
191 
^2 
193 
i95 



Charley Apopka 

G. A. Mack 

Pure and Impure Foods 229 

Book Notices 231 

Publisher's Notes 233 

Editor's Corner 234 

Amateur Photography 238 



YOV CAN'T LOSE 'EM 

WITH 

WASHBURNE'S Kv T ED 

FASTENER and K£Y CHAIN 

Your keys are always with you. Yon cannot lay them down or 
ieave thera anywhere but in your pocket. At your dealers or 
sent on receipt of price— Key Rings and Chain, 25c; Cuff 
Holders, aoc. a pair; Scarf Holders, 10c. Send for illustrated 
catalog. 

AMERICAN RING CO., Dept. 44, Waterbary, Conn. 



Skin Diseases 

Eczema, Salt Rheum, Pimples, Ring- 
worm, Itch, Ivy Poison, Acne or other 
skin troubles, can be promptly cured by 

Hydrozone 

Hydrozone is endorsed by leading phy- 
sicians. It is absolutely harmless, yet 
most powerful healing agent, that cures 
by destroying the parasites which cause 
these diseases. 

Cures sunburn in 24 hours. In cases of 
Prickly Heat and Hives it will stop itch- 
ing at once, also will relieve mosquito 
bites instantly. Take no substitute and 
see that every bottle bears my signature. 

TriaJ Size, 25 Cents. 

At Druggists or by mai.il, from 



J^ojuJGuJ^ 




-«2-*<J> 



F— 59 Prince St., New York. 



free: 



/Booklet on the rational treat* 
\ment of diseases sent free. 



11 



RECREATION. 



a 



NOTHING SO RARE AS RESTING ON AIR." 




TAKING MINE EASE. 
The only article in your outing outfit that you can use during the whole year is a 

Pneumatic Mattres 

OR CUSHION 



THE EVER PRESENT ROOT 

in the bed of boughs is a thing of the past if you 
use a Pneumatic Mattress. A mattress for 
home use that you can deflate, pack in your 
grip and take with you into camp. 




SPRUCE BOUGHS 

may make a fine bed. But the genuine Sports- 
man prefers a Pneumatic Mattress because he 
knows he can do three times the tramping the 
day following a night's good sleep. 




Sportsman's Cushion 

A Yoke to save your shoulders 

A Swimming Collar for those 
who can't swim. 

A Life Preserver in case of 
accident. 

A Cushion while waiting for 
Moose. 

A Cushion or Head Rest while 
waiting for Duck. 

A Protection for your shoulder 
if the gun is heavy. 

A Cushion for CAMP, BOAT, 
OFFICE or HOME. 




PRICE $2.00 
Carry it in your Pocket, it weighs just One Pound. 

Swimming Collar. 

Worn around the neck, leaving the arms 
free for action. Will support a full-grown 
man. Just the thing when learning to swim # 
Price, Small Size, $1.50 Large Size, $2.00 

Pneumatic Mattress 6 Cushion Company, 
2 R South Street, New York City. 




Swimming Collar. 



RECREATION. 




in postage stamps will bring the biggest catch an angler, camber or 
sportsman can land — Abercrombie and Fitch's catalogue R, 160 pages, 
cuts and prices. 

We guarantee to furnish a more satisfactory fisherman's outfit than can 
be obtained elsewhere. 

Complete outfits for explorers, campers and prospectors. Camp outfits 
from the most modest and practical to the most complete and luxurious. 

Compare our prices on tents, clothing, cooking outfits, folding buckets, camp packs, cots, chairs, food bags folding 
shelves, guns, boots, moccasins, sleeping bags, pack saddles, stoves, pneumatic beds, cushions, duffle bags pack 'harness 
folding bakers, folding lanterns, rolling tables, fishing tackle, shoes, covers, &c. ' 

314=316 BR04DWAY, NEW YOPK CITY 



iv RECREATION. 



Decorate Your Den 

With a set of the most beautiful 

Hunting and Fishing Pictures 

ever made. 
15 Plates. Size for Framing, 18x24 inches 



SUBJECTS : 

ELK HUNTING SALMON FISHING 

MOOSE HUNTING TROUT FISHING 



I HY. SANDHAM 



MALLARD SHOOTING — BLACK BASS FISHING — c. e. denton 



TARPON FISHING — BLUE FISHING — fred s. cozzens 



ANTELOPE HUNTING — GOOSE SHOOTING — fred remington 



GROUSE SHOOTING — WILD TURKEY HUNTING— R. F. ZOGBAUM 



MUSKALONGE FISHING — f. h. taylor 



DEER HUNTING — a. b. frost 



ROCKY MOUNTAIN SHEEP HUNTING — e. knobel 



These 15 plates are lithographed in true colors of nature and altogether make 
one of the finest series of pictures of outdoor sports ever published. 

ORIGINALLY ISSUED AT $50 A SET 

I have bought the last of them and can furnish a complete set for 15 yearly 
subscriptions to Recreation, 

Or will Sell at $10 a Set 



I also have enlargements of the following photographs: 

ROCKY MOUNTAIN GOATS 

Published on pages 90, 91, 92, and 93 of the February issue of Recreation, 

$5 a set. 

WOOD DUCK SHOOTING 

Published on page 95 of the February issue of Recreation, $'.50 each. 



Address : RECREATION, 23 West 24th Street, New Yof k City 



RECREATION. 



Canadian Pacific Ry. 

* * THE, MOOSE HUNT. # * 




Stands for canoe, 
Which all must agree 
Floats rather too deeply 
To stand any sea. 




Just means the packs, 
In which we have stored 
All dunnage that's needed 
For sport, bed or board* 






. : , .: ,;. .... . . . . 




*£•♦£♦♦£♦*£•♦-*-*♦£♦♦£♦•£♦*£* 



Was the rover, 
Full sixteen hands tall, 
Whofce antlers are gracing 
Our snug, study's walL 



For further particulars apply to 

ROBERT KERR, Passenger Traffic Manager, MONTREAL. 



VI 



RECREATION. 




No Picture 

can show you the good qualities of the Kenwood 
Sleeping Bag. You must see a complete combina- 
tion bag to understand how perfectly it is adapted to 
the use of every man who sleeps out of doors or in a 
tent, under all conditions of climate and weather. 

If your dealer does not have the Kenwood Sleep- 
ing Bag, write us for samples, prices and full informa- 
tion, then decide which quality you want and order it 
on approval. If it does not suit you in every way return 
it. We pay charges both ways. Don't buy any other 
sleeping bag or blankets before you have seen the 
Kenwood. 

THE KENWOOD MILLS 

ALBANY, N. Y. 



RECREATION. 



vn 




tt£ 






TYPICAL SCENE. MUSK OKA LAKES 



s£^-^~ 



<c^> 



|1USK§KA , ' c rt|TEL j ,MUSK§KA LAKE£ 

We cuisine iri(i(?nificpht ^ e5ort region in ArnericM 
Aboc/P '^o'5°'iL°°flJ eei Hav Fpuer- assured. 



/ 



^ 




Forfull hdrlieul^r5,Tllustr^ted dej&Wrtive lit erdtq re, rates, m&fvS. 

6r>d dli infafm^ffcn, o^ly to 
.G.T\ BElrCGehl^'RjaSr^ndT^t.Ageftt.- 

NK .RAILWAY 3Y ST£ f*1 y > .^MONTREAL , QU 

"5KOKA NAVIGATION CO^Lt d m ••^air 

■^— ,- : — ' — rr ,V 



\ 




«Sf 




^SllSz 



ROYAL MVSKOKA HOTEL 





Vlll 



RECREATION. 



SPRATT'S PATENT 

Cat Food 



A LL breeders of high-class or exhibition cats have 
come to the conclusion from practical experience 
that an excessive meat diet, raw or cooked, is in" 
jurious to cats that are kept in confinement. It is also 
bad for the coat and it is difficult with unsystematic feed- 
ing to keep the animal in exhibition form. 

C«—»4«><. lY.ff.t has revolutionized the old method 

aprati s Patent ,«-..-,,-, A A 

r of Feeding Cats and prepared an 

easily digestible cooked food, composed of the different 
meals, flour, vegetables, etc., and containing only the 
necessary quantity of meat, together with other ingre- 
dients calculated to keep the cat in good health and ex- 
hibition form. 

ft has been used for many years at the National Cat 
Shows held in the English Crystal Palace; also at the 
American National Cat Show in Madison Square Garden 
and at most large exhibitions, besides which it is in 
constant use at the leading catteries. The increasing 
demand for it is the best proof of its virtues and value. 

Price:— $4.00 per 50 lbs.; $2.25 per 25 lbs;; $1.00 per 10 
lbs.; Carton, 25c. Sample box, 5c. Postage (6c. extra. ) 

Write for our Catalogue, "Dog Culture," (with a chap- 
ter on Cats) and practical chapters on the feeding, kenneling 
and management of dogs, post free. 

SPRATT'S PATENT (AM.) Ltd. 

450 Market St., Newark, N. J. 

714 S. Fourth St., St. Louis, Mo. 

1324 Valencia St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Manufacturers of all kinds of Dog Foods and Medicines 



" The groves were God's first temples." 



SEPTEMBER 
IN THE 
ADIRONDACKS 



No finer place in September can 
be found than the Adirondacks. 
The air is cool and bracing, the 
fishing fine, the scenery beautiful, 
and they can be reached in a night 
from Boston, New York or Niagara 
Falls. All parts of the Adiron- 
dacks are reached by the 

NEW YORK CENTRAL LINES 



A copy of No. 20 of the "Four-Track Series." 
"The Adirondacks and How to Reach Them," 
will be sent free on receipt of a 2-cent stamp by- 
George H. Daniels, General Passenger Agent, 
New York Central R. R., Grand Central Station, 
New York. 



TALES OF 
ADVENTURE. 

Bare Hunting ail Hun Stories. 

I have a few sets of Volume 3 of 
Recreation, July to December, in- 
clusive, 1895. These are handsomely 
bound in cloth, with leather backs 
and corners. 

Here are the titles of a few of the 
choice stories in the book. 

Woodcock on the Islands. 

Illustrated* F. W. G. Johnson. 
The' Gordon Setter. 

Illustrated. Dr. J. Whitaker 
Salmon Fishing in Labrador. 

Illustrated. Col. Charles E. Fuller- 
Coursing with the Greyhound 

Illustrated. L. F. Bartels 
A Bald-Faced Grizzly in Camp. 

Illustrated. M. W. Miner 
Where Leaps the Ouananiche. 

(Poem.) Dr. E. L. Tiffany 

Fly Fishing Dr. M. G. Ellzey 

A Hali Hour With the Quail. 

Dr. E. P. Kremer (Juvenis) 
A Deer Drive with Spokane Indians. 

Illustrated. Lieut. W. R. Abercrombie 
An Indian Horse Race. 

Maj. F. M. Bernard 
The Old Kentucky .Rifle. (Poem.) 

Illustrated. Capt. J. W. Crawford 
A Mystery of the Tetons. 

Illustrated. Ed. H. Trafton 
Pheasant Shooting. 

Illustrated. Thomas G. Farrell 
Sitting Bull's Last Medicine. 

Illustrated. Margaret Gray Brooks- 
Crossing the Plains 30 Years Ago. 

Illustrated. Gen. John Gibbon, U. S. A. 
A Mountain Lion Hunt by Night. 

Illustrated. Robert Meade Smith, M.D. 
Trouting on Clark's Fork. 

Illustrated. Gen. F.W. Benteen,U. S. A. 
Ducking off Machipongo. 

Illustrated. W. J. Bogert 
A Youthful Guide and a Prize Bighorn. 

Illustrated. Hon. 1. N. Hibbs 
A Wild Goose Chase. 

Illustrated. A. E. McKenzie 
A Tempestuous Cruise. 

Illustrated. Commodore Chas. Pryer 
Hans the Wolf Hunter. 

(Poem.) Illustrated. S. N. McAdoo 
How Some Women Went Shooting. 

Illustrated. Julia C. Welles 

These books will be sold at $2.00 
each, and when the present supply is ex- 
hausted there will never be any more. If 
you want a copy remit at once. Address, 

RECREATION, & 2 « 



RECREATION. 



IX 



-5v\ 



IF 

you want 



7, 



LV 



r ;c 



TO GET VIM 

and elasticity in a pup 
troubled with worms, get rid 
of the worms. If you want lus- 
trous eyes and jolly companionship 
in a dog who has worms, kill the worms. 
There is in every business some standard of 
excellence that all strive to gain all claim they 
have it yet still keep striving. We believe we have 
in "SURE SHOT" the standard vermifuge because it is 
compounded by a scientific, practical and experienced man 
who has owned and studied the well dog and the sick dog in home 
and in field pretty much all his life. At any rate we do not try to 
better it for we know it can't be improved upon, and the formula is our 
sole property. 

You've known all along what worms will do to a dog as a puppy or adult. 
Now you know the best remedy for ridding a dog of worms. 

SERGEANT'S "SURE SHOT" 

is a remedy with a string of successful years behind it, because it is 
thoroughly safe and reliable. No harm can follow its use even if worms 
are not the trouble, and it will give puppies a strong, healthy constitu- 
tion that will fight victoriously the ravages of disease later in life. No 
first-class kennel manager or private owner ever thought of being with- 
out it, once he used it. 

Lock Box 103, Holly Springs, Miss. 
" I consider "SURE SHOT" the best medicine I have ever used for worms in 
puppies, and the least trouble to administer. Mrs. ROBERT HASTIN GS. 

SERGEANTS "SURE SHOT" per bottle 50c. Sold by Druggists or 
Sporting Goods Dealers everywhere or mailed (prepaid) from 

POLK MILLER DRUG CO., 

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA, BOX 217. 

There isn't anywhere a dog lover or owner who wouldn't 
like to have our 48 page Treatise on 
Dogs. We will send it and a Ped- 
igree Blank to any address for 
3 cents in stamps, which 
go to pay the postage. 



^S- 



Q^— -^ 



POi-KMlLLER 



& 



RECREATION. 



STILL ANOTffER GREAT OFFER 

A Grade 00 Syracuse Gun 



Listed at $30 . 



FOR 



25 Yearly Subscriptions 



TO 



Recreation 



If you Want one of the Guns get a move on you 

Sample copies for use in canvassing 
furnished on application 



RECREATION. 23 W. 24th Street New York 



RECREATION. 



XI 



THt 
WORLDS 
\STANDARD 



THEYRE MADE TO MEASURE 

Putman Boots 

Goon like a glove'***fit all over. 



■"O 



For a Quarter of a Century Putman Boots have been the Stand- 
ard among Western Hunters, Prospectors, Ranchmen and Engineers (who 
demand the best) and we have learned through our personal contact 
with them how to make a perfect boot. 

Putman Boots are in use in nearly every civilized country in the 
World. They are Genuine Hand Sewed, Water proof, Made to measure, 
Delivery charges prepaid, and cost no more than others. Send for Cat- 
alogue of over 30 different styles of boots. Also Indian Tanned 
Moosehide Moccasins. We send with catalogue Order Blanks show- 
ing how to measure your foot. We have in our files thousands of letters similar to the following. 

Gentlemen: — Please send me another cat- 
alogue. We are all wearing Putman Boots and 
find them far superior to any other boot. I have 
ordered about 20 pairs for friends here during 
the past three years, and every pair has given 
perfect satisfaction, and I feel that I have done 
a man a favor when I have recommended your 
goods to him. Respectfully, 

W. H. Fluker, Gen. Mgr, 

(Columbia Mining Co.) 

Tatham, Ga. 

Gentlemen: — I have just returned from a 
duck hunt in Colleton Co. this state, and though 
I tramped through the marshes for six days and 
a part of the nights , sinking in mud and water 
nearly to the tops of the shoes I got from you, 
my feet kept dry throughout the trip and the 
shoes were as soft at the wind-up as at the be- 
gining. I can cheerfully recommend yourshoes 
to all sportsmen. Yours respectfully, 
C. F. Dill, 

Greenville, S. C. 

Gentlemen:— Was fishing through the 
ice on the Flathead River this week stand- 
ing for hours in wet snow and slush and 
tramping through the mountains, and I 
found the boots you built for me in De- 
cember to be thoroughly water and snow 
proof, and quite warm. Yours truly. 

L. R. Fogle, Great falls, Mont. 

Illustration shows 
No. 900, 14 inch 
Boot, made to mea- 
sure and delivered 
in U. S. for 

$7.50. 




Minneapolis. Minn. 



xii RECREATION. 



ANOTHER GREAT OFFER 

TO AMATEUR 
PHOTOGRAPHERS 



A 4x5 SERIES 1 KORONA CAMERA 

LISTED AT f 12, FOR 8 YEARLY SUBSCRIPTIONS TO RECREATION; 

A 5x7 SERIES 1 KORONA CAMERA 

LISTED AT $16, FOR 12 YEARLY SUBSCRIPTIONS; 

A 4x5 SERIES 2 KORONA CAMERA 

LISTED AT $i&, FOR 14 YEARLY SUBSCRIPTIONS; 

A 4x5 SERIES 3 KORONA CAMERA 

LISTED AT $22, FOR 18 YEARLY SUBSCRIPTIONS; 

A 4x5 SERIES 4 KORONA CAMERA 

LISTED AT $25, FOR 20 YEARLY SUBSCRIPTIONS; 

A 4x5 SERIES 5 KORONA CAMERA 

LISTED AT #35, FOR 30 YEARLY SUBSCRIPTIONS. 

SAMPLE COPIES, FOR USE IN CANVASSING, 
BURNISHED FREE. 

ADDRESS 

RECREATION 

23 WEST 24TH STREET, NEW YORK CITY 



RECREATION. 



Xlli 



Ever been 
there Friend? 

If so you know 

that you 

can't 

get through 

without an axe. 

Marble's 

Safety 

Pocket 

Axe 

is the way out 

of difficulties. 

Large enough to fell a tree, build a camp 
or quarter a deer. Small enough to go in 
the pocket. Send for Catalogue. *A 

SOLD BY DEALERS OR DIRECT FROM THE 

MARBLE SAFETY AXE CO., 

GLADSTONE, MICH. 






Cut % actual 
Size. 



WISE men don't go 
hunting, or fish- 
ing, or camping, 
or yachting* or pros- 
pecting, without a 
compass. 

MARBLE'S 

HANDY 

COMPASS 

attaches to outside of coat or 
Test. Always in sight. Can- 
not be lost, cannot be demag- 
netized. Thoroughly reliable. 
Price with revolving card and 
jeweled needle, $1.50. With 
plain jeweled needle, $1.25. 
Send for Catalogue, A 
For Sale By Dealer*, or 
MARBLE SAFETY AXE CO. 

6LADSTONE, MICH. 




Delightful 



Comfort 



Nowhere can a person secure more real, de- 
lightful comfort on a railway journey than on the 
great trains over the Lake Shore and Michigan 
Southern Ry. 

And this is due to the equipment — always the 
best — excellence of road bed and nicety of 
track adjustment, features wherein it excels 
all others, and which make every mile one 
of comfort and pleasure. 
When you have occasion to 
travel between Chicago and 
Cleveland, Buffalo, New 
York and Boston, by using 
i the Lake Shore you will se- 

cure absolutely the best in 
travel that money can buy. 
For "Book of Trains" or 
' ' travel information, address 

A. J. SMITH, General Pass, and Ticket 
Agent, Cleveland, Ohio. 



i\m.' .' 



XIV 



RECREATION. 



"FOR 34 YEARS A STANDARD PIANO." 

The Wing Piano 



VHT T IMFF H "TT-JT^ "ROOTT IF YOU intend to buy a piano, a book 

I \J\J 1N.LVCL/ I 1 11<J DVJVJ1\ —not a catalogue— that gives you all the informa- 
tion possessed by experts. It makes the selection of a piano easy. If read carefully, it will make you 
a judge of tone, action, workmanship and finish ; will tell you how to know good from bad. It de- 
scribes the materials used ; gives pictures of all the different parts, and tells how they should be made 
and put together. It is the only book of its kind ever published. It contains 116 large pages, and is 
named "The Book of Complete Information About Pianos." We send it free to anyone wishing 
to buy a piano. Write for it. 

QAT7TJ T7L>rMl7T ^tnn TO <t">fin We make the WING PIANO and sell it our- 
jnVH riXXJ 1V1 .pUJU 1 \J q)^UU selves. It goes direct from our factory to 
your home. We do not employ any agents or salesmen. When you buy the WING PIANO you pay 
the actual cost of construction and our small wholesale profit. This profit is small because we sell 
thousands of pianos yearly. Most retail stores sell no more than twelve to twenty pianos yearly, and 
must charge from fioo to I200 profit on each. They can't help it. 




A Wing style — 45 other styles to select from. 

CCfVPT* rMVT TDT A T WE PAY FREIGHT. NO MONEY IN ADVANCE. We will 
OHIN 1 KJV* 1 rvlr\i^ send any WING PIANO to any part of the United States on 
trial. We pay freight in advance and do not ask for any advance payment or deposit. It the piano is 
not satisfactory after twenty days' trial in your home, ive take it back entirely at our expense. You pay 
us nothing unless you keep the piano. There is absolutely no risk or expense to you. 

Old instruments taken in exchange. EASY MONTHLY PAYHENTS. 

INSTRUMENTAL ATTACHMENT &Ef£SS£ ™f 

the tones of the mandolin, guitar, harp, zither and banjo. 

IN 34 YEARS 33,000 PIANOS Z^^&SSSgg&wB, 

PIANOS are guaranteed for twelve years against any defect in tone, action, workmanship or material. 

"Vr/TNIf {"YDf" 1 A rVT^ Are J ust as carefully made as Wing Pianos. They have a sweet, 
W UN VJ WlvvxrVlN O powerful, lasting tone, easy action, very handsome appearance, need 
no tuning. Wing Organs are sold direct from the factory, sent on trial are-'sodl; on easy monthly 
payments. For catalogue and prices write to 



WING & SON, 



432 and 434 West 13th. St„ 
NEw* YORK. 
J868— 35th Year-J903. 



RECREATION. 



xv 



Sent on Approval 

TO RESPONSIBLE PEOPLE 

Laughlin 

Fountain Pen 



Guaranteed Finest 

Grade 14k. 
SOLID GOLD PEN. 

To test the merits of 



WNttlijj 

6"*E» 



RECREATION 

as an advertising medium 
we make this grand spe- 
cial offer, your choice of 




These 
Two 
Popular 
Styles 
For Only 



$ 



1 




Postpaid 

to any 

Address 



(By Registered mail 8 cents extra) 

Holder is made of finest 
quality hard rubber, in four 
simple parts, fitted with 
very highest grade, large 
size 14k, gold pen, any flex- 
ibility desired — in feeding 
device perfect. 

Either Style— RICHLY 
GOLD HOUNTED for pre- 
sentation purposes, $1.00 
extra. 

Grand Special 
Offer 

You may try the pen a 
week ; if you do not find it 
as represented, fully as 
fine a value as you can 
secure for three times the 
price in any other makes, 
if not satisfactory in every 
respect, return it and we 
will promptly refund your 
money. 

Illustration on left is full 
size of Ladies' style; on 
right, Gentlemen's style. 
Lay this RECREATION Down 
and Write NOW. 

Safety Pocket Pen Hold- 
er sent free of charge with 
each Pen. 

address ; 



Laughlin Flfg. Co. 

424 Griswold St., DETROIT, MICH. 




The Best 

of Good Company 

is always at your command if you've a Combination 
Table in your home. A handsome library or dining 
table changed to billiards or pool by removing top.The 

Indianapolis Combination Table 

Library— Dining— Billiard— Pool. 

is the equal of the finest standard table except in size 
which is suited to the home. Vermont slate bed, sensi- 
tive rubber cushions, imported French billiard cloth, 
genuine ivory billiard balls, balanced cues. Nine 
styles. %,%y s standard billiard table sizes.The correct 
table for your library or dining room is among them. 

Write for our new illustrated catalogue and full information. 

Combination Billiard Mfg. Co., 33-43 iugaiis street, Indianapolis, Inl 




$ Have you seen one? It is 
^ up-to-date. Think of it, 
everything within reach. No 
heavy trays, but light, smooth 
drawers. Holds as much and costs 
no more than a good box trunk. 
Hand riveted, almost indestructible.. 
Once tried, always recommended. 
Sent C. O. I)., privilege examination* 
ac. stamp for catalogue. Mention Recreation. 

F. A. STALLMAN. 
67 W. 45j»rii\tf St.* Columbus, O* 



Trunk 



XVI 



RECREATION. 




s 

s 

I 

S 

S 
I 
S 



WHI 




We are willing to lose money to get you to try HAYNER WHISKEY, for we know if you 
only try it you will always buy it, just as our half-a-million satisfied customers are now doing. 
Remember, we have one of the largest distilleries in the world. We are the largest bottlers 
of whiskey in the world. We have more whiskey in our eight Bonded Warehouses than any 
other distiller in the world. There is more HAYNER WHISKEY sold than any other brand of whis- 
key in the world. We have been in business over 37 years and have a capital of $500,000.00 
paid in full, so you run no risk when you deal with us. Your money back at once if you are 
not satisfied. Don't forget that HAYNER WHISKEY goes direct from our own distillery to YOU, 
with all its original strength, richness and flavor, thus assuring you of perfect purity and sav- 
ing you the enormous profits of the dealers. You cannot buy anything purer, better or 
more satisfactory than HAYNER WHISKEY no matter how much you pay. Don't forget that a 
HAYNER quart is an honest quart of 32 ounces, 4 to the gallon. All other high grade whiskies 
are sold in so-called "quart" bottles that require 5 to the gallon. We give give you one 
fourth more whiskey in every bottle, really reducing our price just that much. We give you 
both QUALITY and QUANTITY. There is nothing cheap about HAYNER WHISKEY except the price. 

I QUART $1.00 
4 QUARTS $3.20 

WE PAY EXPRESS CHARGES IN EITHER CASE. 



Send us $1.00 for ONE QUART or $3.20 for FOUR QUARTS of HAYNER SEVEN-YEAR-OLD 

RYE, and we will ship in a plain sealed package, with no marks to even suggest 
contents. We will pay the express charges. When the whiskey reaches your 
home, try it, sample it thoroughly. Then, if you don't find it all right, perfectly sat- 
isfactory in every way and better than you ever had before or can buy from any- 
body else AT ANY PRICE, ship it back to us at our expense and your 
money will be promptly refunded. Isn't that fair? We stand all the expense if you 
don't wish to keep the whiskey. YOU risk nothing. We ship one quart on your 
first or trial order only. All subsequent orders must be for at least 4 quarts at 80 
cents a quart. The packing and express charges are almost as much on one 
quart as on four and even at$i.oo for one quart we lose money, but we want you 
to try it. WE PREFER TO HAVE YOU ORDER FOUR QUARTS FOR $3.20 RIGHT NOW FOR THEN 
WE WILL MAKE A LITTLE PROFIT AND YOU WILL ALSO SAVE MONEY. But take your 
choice. $1.00 for 1 quart or $3.20 for 4 quarts, express prepaid. Your money back 
if you're not satisfied. Write our nearest office TO-DAY. 

Trial orders for Ariz., Cal., Col., Idaho, Mont., Nev., N. Mex., Ore., Utah, Wash., or Wyo., 
must be 1 Quart for $1.25 by EXPRESS PREPAID. Subsequent orders on the basis of 4 QUARTS for 
$4.00 by EXPRESS PREPAID or 20 Quarts for $16.00 by FREIGHT PREPAID. 



i 
s 

1 
t 




ESTABLISHED 
1866. 



HiOTNER'S 

SEVEN YEAH OLD 




THE HAYNER DISTILLING COMPANY, 



DISTILLERY 
TROY, OHIO. 



iJJSTILLERSir I 



DAYTOH, OHIO. ST. LOUIS, MO., ST. PAUL, MINN., ATLANTA, GA., 

£30? *30? £30?te0?£30?te0?*30? 130? $&? £30? 8 





HE WAS UTTERING HIS WEIRD CALL IN TONES AS INSPIRING AND AS MUSICAL AS 

THE NOTES OF A FLUTE. 



166 



Volume XIX. 



RECREATION 

SEPTEMBER, J903 
G. 0. SHIELDS, (COQUINA) Editor and Manager 



Number 3 



HUNTING ELK IN A WINDFALL. 



E. B. SHANKS. 



It was a warm afternoon late in 
September when we left the trail and 
plunged into the hills, looking for a 
desirable camping spot. We finally 
unpacked well up among the ridges 
West of the Buffalo fork of the Snake 
river, in Western Wyoming. 

We had lived on salt side for some 
time, and were hungry for fresh meat. 
My friend Parker, of Galesville, Wis- 
consin, was anxious to at least see a 
band of elk at home in their mountain 
range. All the other boys had either 
secured game or had had the oppor- 
tunity and had sinned away the mo- 
ment of grace before fully realizing 
what they were doing. We had made 
a long trip and were anxious to get 
back home, but I sympathized with 
Parker. I proposed that we start 
early the next morning for a timbered 
gulch 5 miles to the Northeast of 
camp, right up in the mountains. We 
busied ourselves the rest of the after- 
noon making camp comfortable and 
getting ready for the hunt. Sunrise 
found us on the way. By 3 p. m. we 
reached the head of the stream where 
the water came trickling down over 
the rim rock from the heavy drifts of 
snow and banks of ice that seem eter- 
nal there. 

It' was an ideal place for game, and 
I cautioned Parker to be prepared to 
meet a grizzly face to face and to be 
ready with his rifle to shoot quickly 
and with his nerve to shoot steadily. 
We advanced a few steps at a time, 
then paused and closely scrutinized 
everything about us. I was a few 
feet in advance. Looking about, I 
became suddenly aware that we were 



167 



in the midst of a splendid band of elk, 
quietly feeding. I had previously de- 
termined to do no shooting. I threw 
myself flat on the ground and at a 
sign Parker did likewise. I then di- 
rected him to advance a few paces to 
a large boulder from behind which 
I felt sure he would be screened 
from sight and at the same time have 
a better view of the band. Parker was 
a true sportsman and had determined 
to shoot at nothing unless it wore ant- 
lers. As I crawled to his side he said 
deliberately, 

"There is not a bull among them." 

I could not believe this, as the band 
numbered about 30. 

"Yes, there is, too !" he exclaimed, 
jumping to his feet. He raised his 
Savage and fired. 

"I missed him, sure," was his next 
remark. He was shooting at a sleek, 
fat, 2-year-old bull that had deliber- 
ately crossed through between some 
evergreens in front of us. The bull 
soon emerged into view again, a little 
farther away, apparently not even 
startled. 

"There he is !" from Parker, fol- 
lowed by the crack of his rifle again. 

"I have missed him again !" he ex- 
claimed, as the* buck again disap- 
peared, only to reappear a little far- 
ther on^ to receive another broadside 
and to disappear again. 

The band was startled, but had 
made no effort to run away, as they 
had neither seen us nor winded us. 
Cows and calves were all about us, 
sleek and fat, but they were safe. We 
had not come after them. 

I was intently watching them and 



i68 



RECREATION. 



the other details of our surroundings, 
drawing inspiration at every breath 
from the beautiful scene, when I was 
surprised at a shrill peal from the sil- 
very bugle of the "lord of the band." 
Looking to the left, up close to the 
lake where an opening in the forest al- 
lowed the sunshine to stream down 
about him, I saw an immense bull, 
with a set of magnificent antlers. 
With his head thrown well up, he was 
uttering his call in tones as inspiring 
and musical as the notes of a flute. 

Those of the band near him made 
toward him, and turning, with steps 
as proud as an emperor's and without 
even breaking his walk, he strode off 
down the gulch, followed by the band. 
They never saw us. Retreating lei- 
surely and falling in behind the others, 
all followed their gallant leader and 
disappeared from view in the forest 
below. 

We walked slowly after them, Par- 
ker bewailing the fate that had lost 
him the spike bull and had deprived 
the camp of fresh meat. We care- 
fully examined the ground his target 
had so leisurely passed over, for some 
traces of his bombardment. We 
found where some of the bullets had 
struck, but farther than that we could 
find nothing. 

"He was just about to disappear 
behind those evergreens this side of 
that big log as I took my last shot at 
him," said Parker as we turned down 
the gulch. 

"Better look the other side of the 
log," I suggested. "You will prob- 
ably find him there." Parker looked 
at me incredulously, but started for 
the log. As he reached it he wheeled 
about, jerked his hat from his head, 
waved it and joyously exclaimed, 

"He's here !" 

This was good news, as it meant 
meat, in addition to the royal sport we 
were having. 

We prepared the buck for trans- 
portation to camp and resumed our 
homeward journey. We had scarcely 
gone ioo yards when we made the 



discovery that we were surrounded, 
actually hemmed in, by a covey of 
mountain grouse. We enjoyed a few 
moments of rare sport, shooting off 
heads with our rifles, as they swayed 
and bobbed unsteadily among the 
branches of the evergreens. 

We left them after Securing a brace 
apieCe* Parker was carrying the liver 
of the elk just killed. We followed 
down the gulch, picking our way over 
so much down timber that we were 
doubtful about reaching the game we 
had killed, with the pack horses. We 
emerged from the timber on open 
ground just as the sun was setting. 

Sitting down on the last log crossed, 
we rested and were enjoying the scene 
before us, when a band of 8 cow elk 
came over a hill between us and the 
river, half a mile away. The band 
was about 300 yards away, coming 
straight toward us up the mountain. 

They had advanced into sight but a 
short distance when we observed, a 
little to the left and nearly parallel 
with them, a large bull coming lei- 
surely in our direction. 

"Had I better shoot at that fel- 
low ?" said Parker, looking intently at 
the bull, which was then about 225 
yards away. 

I was undecided what to say. It 
was probable we could never get a 
pack horse up to where he had killed 
the other elk. Here was a chance for 
him to get a set of horns and at the 
same time get meat that there would 
be no trouble in packing into camp. 

"Yes, let him have it." 

Parker dropped on one knee and 
fired quickly. The bull turned and 
walked toward the cows, picking his 
way as if his feet were sore. 

At the second shot he humped his 
back slightly. The third shot was 
fired as he was nearly out of sight in 
a slight depression in the ground. 
Parker was terribly chagrined, think- 
ing he had scored a series of misses. 

After the bull's body had disap- 
peared from sight his horns were still 
visible. They suddenly disappeared, 




IN THE WINDFALL, 
169 



170 



RECREATION. 



and in their place I felt certain I had 
seen his heels. I consoled Parker by 
telling him I was sure he had killed 
his game. 

We found the bull lying as nearly 
on his back as it was possible for him 
to lie, with 3 bullet holes through 



him, any one of which would have 
killed him. 

Next day the meat was packed in. 
We saved nearly all of it, Parker and 
Paterson packing most of the first elk 
on their backs down to where we 
could reach it with the horses. 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY R. H. BEEBE. 



YOUNG YELLOW WARBLERS. 
One of the 18th Prize Winners in Recreation's 7th Annual Photo Competition. 



SONG OF THE HUNTER. 



F. D. A. 

Away to the hills and the wooded dell, 
Where woodcock, grouse and squirrels 

dwell ; 
To the haunts of the fox, who from his lair 
Steals on the unsuspecting hare. 
Where stately trees their shadows cast 
On crystal stream that, rippling past, 
Hides deep within its rushing tide, 
The speckled trout, the sportsman's pride. 



WALKER. 

Away to the forest old and grand, 
Where ancient oaks and maples stand, 
On cragged steep and mountain drear, 
Where lives in peace the timid deer. 
O'er reedy marsh and quaking bog, 
By quiet lake, with gun and dog, 
To hunt the water fowls so shy, 
That all your skill and patience try. 



Then come with me, bring dog and gun, 
For the hunting time has now begun; 
And when the morning's early light, 
Steals through the darkness of the night, 
We'll start for the hills and the wooded 

dell, 
Where woodcock, grouse and squirrels 

dwell ; 
To the haunts of the fox who from his 

lair, 
Steals on the unsuspecting hare. 



SOME FEATHERED FOLK. 



MARTHA M. WILLIAMS. 



Tom Coffin was the most engaging of 
, hem all, a cardinal, trapped in time of 
miow, and as full of fight as any real car- 
dinal that ever ruffed it in the red robe. 
It was his fighting quality indeed which 
darned him his name. Cooper's Tom Cof- 
(in never fought more gamely. The red 
l)ird bit his captor's fingers almost to the 
|)one before he suffered himself to be 



to think they would be the finest sort of 
eating if only he could manage to get 
them loose. When his cage was set open 
he would fly out, and across the room, to 
perch on her finger, where he would ruffle 
his red throat and twitter loudly, if she 
said, "Tom, tell me good morning." 

A water bucket sat, always open, in the 
back hall, some little way off the room 




taken from 

the trap and after 

he was caged, would ruffle his 

feathers, drop his wings, make 

a loud, scowling noise, and 

try to peck the eyes of any 

head which came incautiously 

near the bars. 

A week of kindness changed all that. 
He quit scolding when approached, twit- 
tering a welcome instead, the while drop- 
ping his wings in gentle deprecation. By 
and by he grew so tame he was given the 
freedom of the whole house. It was pretty 
then to see him fly upon the head of his 
mistress, gently tweak her hair, then make 
a fluttering hop to her shoulder and peck 
at her earrings. The earrings were tiny 
golden half moons, and Tom Coffin seemed 



TOM'S ORCHARD NEMESIS 



where his cage 
hung- Tom often 
hopped upon the 
bucket's rim and 
balanced there daint- 
ily a minute; but 
never tried to touch 
the water even when 
the bucket was so full he might easily 
have sipped it. But as certainly as 
water was left standing in a shallow 
basin on the table beside the bucket, 
Tom plunged into it, splashing and 
spluttering to his heart's content, seeming 
to prefer it infinitely to his own bath in- 
side the cage. When he came out of the 
water he hopped laboriously upon the ba- 
sin rim, stood still a minute, then ruffled 
every feather and gave himself a tremen- 



171 



172 



RECREATION. 



dous shake. As the weather grew warm he 
flew in and out at will. Horses grazed 
sometimes in the yard, and left deep, cuppy 
tracks in the turf. When the spring rains 
made of those tracks little clear pools Tom 
Coffin made a point of bathing in every 
pool. He sank his little red body clear 
under water, spread his wings, lay down, 
now on this side, now on that, wallowing 
as a fowl wallows in dust, but always keep- 
ing his head out, and whirling round and 
round so as to look on every side of him. 

Tom would have been perfectly happy 
in captivity but for the fact that he had a 
skulking enemy, a pestilent fellow who 
lived behind something white and clear 
and hard, who mimicked every motion 
Tom made, even to rushing at him with 
lowered wings, ruffled crest and open bill. 
Notwithstanding, Tom could never get at 
him. After a dozen ineffectual rushes, the 
first time he discovered this mocker, Tom 
walked first to one side, then the other, 
of the hard, white, shining thing that kept 
them apart, peeped behind it several 
times, then turned away puzzled, only to 
find as he walked back in front of the 
white thing that the bird he could not find 
was there again. After 2 or 3 further in- 
effectual rushes, Tom withdrew a little 
way, scolding loudly. He saw the other 
bird also scolding, raising and lowering 
his crest, his throat pulsing in a loud clut- 
tering skirl. Tom turned his back con- 
temptuously on the coward, flew off to 
his cage, hopped upon the highest perch 
there, and sang his loudest and most tri- 
umphant song, stopping every little 
while to hear if the other bird was also 
singing. At length, however, he be- 
came satisfied that the other fellow was 
out of it, and though he never failed to 
fight a bit when the 2 came face to face, 
it was evidently not a real battle; only a 
sham one to save the situation. After a 
dash or 2 Tom flew away, to a tree out- 
side, or to the top of a tall window, seem- 
ing to say in song, "Really, that fellow is 
beyond endurance, but you see I have 
punished him as he deserves." 

A red winged blackbird made himself 
exceedingly conspicuous about the house, 
and more especially in the marsh below the 
orchard, during a part of Tom's sojourn in 
the family. He seemed to take delight in 
bantering and teasing Tom, though he may 
not have meant his visits in that way. His 
call seemed discordant and defiant, what- 
ever his meaning may have been. Tom was 
always ready to accept the challenge, if it 
were such, and that no battle was really 
fought was due to the fact that this red 
winged visitor seemed to believe in the old 
adage that the bird that calls and flies away 
may live to call another day. 

Tom's courtship was high comedy with 
a tragic ending. In April his cage was 



swung in a damson tree some little way 
from the front porch and the door was 
propped open. Tom slept in the cage every 
night, though by daylight he ranged the 
whole orchard, garden and hedge row. 




FLIRTING. 



The second day outside his mistress found 
him flirting with a small, very shy. 
browny red person, who flitted out of 
sight almost the minute she was seen. 




A BED OF ROSE LEAVES. 



But she came almost to the cage with 
Tom when he sought his perch, and 
answered his sleepy love calls in plaintive 



SOME FEATHERED FOLK. 



*73 



tremolo. Still it took him a week to coax 
her inside the cage, and once there she 
shot out when somebody laughed on the 
porch. The next day she fluttered all 
around, but would not go in, though Tom 
was hopping in and out, carrying bits of 
bark and sticks, in sign that he thought 
it high time nest making was begun. All 
the while he called to her and was an- 
swered. Toward sundown another cardinal 
began calling love to the little browny red 
thing. She set her head doubtfully 
on one side and piped a weak answer. 
Tom heard it, dashed out of the cage 
and at the intruder, who was flying to- 
ward the damson tree. At once the 2 
clinched, tussling so fiercely they fell to 
the ground. A big stray cat, gaunt and 
white, darted from the ambush of the 
garden fence, tried to catch both birds, 
did catch poor Tom, and before he could 
be forced to drop his prey so mangled 
Tom Coffin that the bird died in 5 
minutes. 

Of course, Tom had a fine funeral. His 
mistress wrapped him in a linen napkin 
and laid him away in a cigar box, cush- 
ioned with pink rose leaves. The grave 
was at the foot of a big rose bush, and 




LITTLE DORRITT AND PIER LORD. 

every year drifts of the same pink petals 
lie heaped above it. 

Little Dorritt was a hedge sparrow, the 
meekest, mildest creature that ever was 
victimized by a hectoring, peevish mate. 
She had a dreadful time building her nest. 
It was begun first in a gooseberry bush, 



handily low, yet well fenced about with 
thorny stalks. She worked there half a 
day, carrying in grass and fine roots and 
industriously weaving them together. 
Her lord, meantime, after fetching a sin- 
gle stick, sat scolding and raising his 
feathers amid the raspberry bushes just 
beyond. Toward afternoon he made a 
dash at the nest, plumped down in it, 
and with beak and wings wrecked it com- 
pletely. Then, with his mouth full of 
fragments, he flew out and away to a 
stubby swinging syringa bough, flung 
down the nest stuff insecurely in a small 
crotch of it, and set up a hoarse twitter- 
ing, full of command. 

Little Dorritt followed him meekly, 
bringing with her other fragments of her 
ruined nest. When she dropped them in 
the nest crotch and began whirling around 
to weave them in place, her mate pecked 
her and sent her flying, then hopped into 
the new nest and began aranging it to 
suit himself. He kept this up until it was 
finished, never letting poor little Dor- 
ritt set one twig or hair to please herself. 
There is no denying he was a good archi- 
tect. The finished nest was round and 
firm as a cup, beautifully smooth inside, 
and lined with the softest, finest hairs. 
But it would have been hard on the little 
wife if those watching the family's estab- 
lishment had not pitied her to the degree 
of putting much nest stuff, fine curving 
grass stems, roots, hairs and soft string 
where she could lay beak on them without 
flying more than 20 yards. 

Possibly she grew wonted to the watch- 
ers in the flying, or it may be she felt 
the helpful impulse of strength so much 
greater than her own. Certain it is, that 
as she brooded her 4 greeny blue eggs 
she never resented a friendly presence, 
but sat on the nest to be looked at, and 
would take worms or cherries from the 
hand if it approached her over her shoul- 
der. Then she lifted her beak, opened it 
and twittered faint thanks. But if the of- 
ferings came facing her she drew her 
head back, tucked it down even with the 
edge of the nest and sat shivering all 
through. She grew to like having her 
back stroked gently with one finger. 
Whole cherries she could not swallow. 
They had to be Seeded and pulled in 2. 
Even then she ate them under protest, 
but slugs and cut worms were her 
delight. She swallowed 7 big cut worms, 
3 slugs and a dozen flies once within 
half an hour. At least, her human friends 
gave her that number at short intervals, 
and her cantankerous mate, no more can- 
tankerous, but most anxious and lover 
like, fed her others between times. As 
his was not the temperament of self de- 
nial, the people in watch decided that a 
pair of active sparrows must consume 




THE CACHE. 



every day about twice their own weight 
in insects, not to name grass and weed 
seed. 

Belial was a thief; whether from nature 
or environment is uncertain. He was also 
a jay, and further, a popinjay, with an 
abnormally developed taste for gauds and 
gewgaws. Red things, shiny things, ap- 
pealed to him irresistibly. He was 
hatched, and lived all his life, among 
some tall oaks in the back yard of a 
bachelor's establishment. The bachelor 
was somewhat a sportsman, also some- 
what rheumatic. As a consequence he 
wore red woolen next his skin. When 
the garments hung drying on the line 
Belial flew down to peck at them, and 
sometimes, if they were worn a bit, to 
tear them and fly triumphantly away with 
a red strip fluttering in his beak. He also 
carried off buttons, empty cartridge shells, 
fragments of looking glass, bits of tin, 
and silver spoons if he could get them. 
That happened not infrequently until the 
black housekeeper learned his habits. She 
was given to washing dishes out in the 
shade of the oaks, always took her time 



over the work, and sometimes also took 
naps. Belial darted down then, snatched 
a spoon, dropped it if he found it too 
heavy and picked a lighter one. For long 
nobody in the least suspected him. He 
might never have been suspected, indeed, 
if he had not been caught in the act of 
trying to fly away with a child's toy tin 
cup. 

Then the trees, all his haunts indeed, 
were searched for stolen goods. Nothing 
whatever was found. What became of his 
pilferings threatened to be a standing 
mystery, but was solved in the end by a 
lucky accident. There was a dead tree 
full of woodpecker holes in the edge 
of the woods ioo yards away. It blew 
down, split partly open in falling, and 
there, plain to view, in one of the holes, 
was a mass of gay colored bits, tangled 
up with other bits that shone. There, too 
was Belial, fluttering above the fallen 
trunk, shouting with each wag of the tail, 
"Ja-ay Raa-ait! Jaa-ay Raa-a-ait!" as 
who should say, "Things are at a pretty 
pass when an honest fellow must lose his 
small accumulations this way." 



Mrs. Muggins — Did you hear about your 
neighbor? She was overcome by coal gas. 

Mrs. Buggins — That's just like them. I 
suppose they were afraid people wouldn't 
know they had coal. — Philadelphia Record. 
174 



A DEER HUNT IN MEXICO. 



J. K. EICHHORN. 



I have been an ardent hunter from boy- 
hood. I was born and raised in Germany, 
where a possible inherent destructiveness 
of the young huntsman meets its first check 
by the law, if from ethical reasons he feels 
not constrained to keep from brutalizing 
himself. The game laws are enforced and 
executed, as all German laws are, with 
promptness and precision. I am thoroughly 
in accord with the spirit of Recreation, 
of which I have been a reader for years. 

In the main range of the Sierra Madre 
mountains, in Mexico, deer and turkeys are 
abundant. The deer there are all white- 
tails, Cariacus virginianus, though only 
a little farther to the North and still in 
this State, as in Sonora and Coahuila, the 
blacktail or mule deer, Cariacus macrotis, 
"veiiados burros/' as the natives call them, 
may frequently be found. 

The wild turkey in these latitudes 
grows, I am told, to a size unusually large. 
My friend, Boon Barker, a hunter who 
has his superior nowhere, and not many 
equals, and who never deviates from the 
truth in a hunting story — yes, quite right, 
Mr. Shields ; a remarkable fellow — has 
stated to me that a year or 2 ago he saw a 
gobbler, dressed, shipped through here by 
express and marked 18 kilos (about 39^2 
pounds) as his weight. On a hunting 
trip which I took with Boon Barker 2 years 
ago I shot the first and only turkey I have 
ever bagged, and he weighed not less than 
35 pounds, dressed. His home and harem 
lay in the beautiful Sierra Banderas, i 1 /^ 
days' horseback ride West of Guatimape, a 
station about 3 hours' ride by rail from 
Durango. If this statement of weight be 
throwing a bone of contention among my 
brother Nimrods, all I would say to them 
is, "Come down here and do likewise !" 

Occasionally bears, black, cinnamon and 
silvertip, are encountered. On the above 
mentioned hunt, lasting 32 days, Barker 
shot a 3 year old cinnamon she bear, fur in 
fair condition, in the Sierra Candela, a 2 
days' horseback ride Northeast from San- 
tiago Papasquiaro. He saw 8 bears during 
that trip, including a black bear with 4 
cubs. After the elusive turkey, bear cer- 
tainly is the shyest game on foot. 

August 20, 1902, I laid low with the first 
shot ever fired from the new barrel on my 
45-90 single shot Winchester a fine 3 year 
old buck, and by way of initiating the ex- 
cellent Marble hunting knife you gave me, 
plunged it into his sticking place. I have 
dubbed the 45-90 single a gentleman's rifle 
par excellence, because it does not even 
suggest wholesale slaughter of game, which 



your rapid fire, smokeless, high power mag- 
azine guns certainly do ; and this 45-90 
serves well all legitimate, pleasurable pur- 
poses of hunting. I had followed this deer, 
in territory about 6 miles from here, 2 
consecutive days over an area of probably 
3 square miles, which he inhabited as the 
only one of his tribe, and had seen him 5 
times before he gave me a shot. The sixth 
time he stood less than 100 yards away, 
looking at me from behind a huge Span- 
ish dagger plant, his fine head, only, ex- 
posed, with horns in the velvet. I thought I 
was close enough to detect fright, but above 
all, utter amazement in his large, express- 
ive eyes, over this sixth reappearance of 
that 2 legged creature, his arch enemy, 
whom he had probably concluded an ap- 
parition. 

I sank down on my right knee, aimed 
where I thought his throat or his brisket 
must be, and let fly. I had a hollow point 
cartridge in the chamber, the efficiency of 
which I wished to try on game. At the 
roar of my rifle, the buck wheeled like a 
flash and disappeared with a few bounds, 
flag down and head stretched in line with 
his body, over a slight rise of the ground. 
That flag staying down and a certain heavi- 
ness in his locomotion assured me that my 
aim had been true. I went over the rise, 
and 40 steps from where he stood when I 
fired lay my noble quarry, in such a pose as 
famous sculptors might have gloated over. 
His handsome head faced his last tracks, 
and he rested, slightly inclined, gracefully 
against the sturdy trunk of the plant, as if 
in sleep. I confess I have never shot one 
of these beautiful creatures without, when 
'twas done, feeling remorse ; yet I have 
earned all the deer I have ever killed if 
hard, persistent tramping and other exer- 
tions count for aught. 

A big pool of blood had scarcely dis- 
colored the dark, rusty red sand under the 
buck's black, delicate nostrils. The bullet 
hole was about 3 inches back of the right 
shoulder and ranging almost straight to 
the opposite side. ' The ball had pierced the 
upper part of the heart and a lobe of the 
lungs, making its exit apparently in 2 
parts ; as 2 holes, % of an inch apart and 
each of the size of that made by the enter- 
ing bullet, indicated. The skin, when taken 
off, proved much bloodshot, from back of 
the ears to within 10 inches of the root of 
the tail. There was also an undiscolored 
stripe, 6 inches wide, from the brisket back 
to the end. The knife brought not over 
an ounce or 2 of blood. 

Yes, my shot was a chance one. 



175 



I?0 



RECREATION. 



The less pleasant aftermath over, and no 
trees being near, I covered my venison 
well with brush, after having pried open 
the breastbone and inserted a stick to ad- 
mit as much air as possible into the carcass. 
Then came a pipe, over which I was caught 
by dusk. 



Darkness has a habit, in these parts, 
of following close on the heels of twi- 
light. It was pitch dark when I mount- 
ed my horse. I gave him the reins and 
he showed much sagacity in taking me 
to the home of my friend Barker, which I 
reached about 9 p. m. 




AMATEUR PHOTO Br A. BURRITT. 



A REMARKABLE REFLECTION. 
Bridge over Mahoning river, Lowellville, Ohio. Taken just before sunrise. 



SEPTEMBER. 



L. C. ELERICK. 



There's a dreamy haze o'er valley and hill; 

There's a hush in the ambient air; 
There's a quieter tone to the rollicking rill, 

And a peacefulness everywhere. 

On the forest leaves is a touch of gold, 
And the red and the crimson show 

That another summer is growing old, 
And calmly preparing to go. 



The song of the wish-ton-wish no more 
Is heard 'neath the aging trees; 

The oriole passes a continent o'er 
And sings by the Southern seas. 

The swallow has gone, and the bluebird 
demure, 
And the finch with bright red breast; 
And with happiness, quiet and holy and. 
pure, 
All nature is sinking to rest. 



RAFTING ON THE ST. JOE. 



GEO. H. ROOT. 

Photos by the Author. 



I had been often told that a trip down 
the St. Joe was a perilous undertaking and 
that few who made it cared to repeat the 
experience. But the love of adventure, and 
a desire to be out of doors got the best of 
me. Early in September, 1901, I, with F,. J. 



Our first day out was uneventful. It 
began to rain as we started. On top of 
the divide between Placer and Slate creeks, 
we ran into a stiff snow storm, but the 
trail led most of the way through heavy 
timber which protected us. That night we 




THE START. 



Martin and Geo. T.Atteberry, left Wallace, 
Idaho, to cross the Bitter Root and strike 
the St. Joe river about 60 miles above 
where it empties into Lake Cceur D'Alene. 
We engaged Ralph Sebastian, an experi- 
enced packer, to carry our outfit to the 
river. For company on the return trip, 
Ralph took along a chum of his, named 
Kemp, as gritty a boy as I ever met. 



camped on the divide between Placer and 
Slate creeks. The next morning being 
clear and bright we went on. 

About 4 miles down the creek, the trail 
zig-zags up a steep mountain. There it 
was that Martin decided to follow the 
creek to the river, which we supposed was 
distant about 7 miles, George and Kemp 
went with him, while Ralph and I, with 



177 



i;8 



RECREATION. 



the pack horse, essayed the climb of what 
seemed to me the highest and steepest 
mountain on earth. When about half way 
up, it began raining; by the time we 
reached the summit it was dark and the 
rain had turned to snow and sleet, which, 
driven by the wind, penetrated our mackin- 
toshes as if they were cheesecloth. But 
we had promised to meet the boys at the 



appearance on arrival at our camp next 
day, the boys must have spent as unpleas- 
ant a night as Ralph and I had. 

It seems that the place where we sepa- 
rated was fully 14 miles from the mouth 
of Slate creek; but thinking they had 
plenty of time, the boys took it easy and 
night overtook them half wav to the river. 
There the canyon becomes narrow and 










LARGEST CATCH ON THE TRIP. 



mouth of Slate creek. We got out some 
candles and 2 small tin pails, which, with 
holes punched in the sides to stick the 
candles through, made good enough lan- 
terns to travel by. With their light we 
made the descent. Reaching the St. Joe 
about midnight, we signaled for our com- 
panions several times by firing a shot gun. 
As we heard no reply we stretched our 
tarpaulin and turned in. 
m Meantime, according to Martin's ver- 
sion and judging from their dilapidated 



the creek rapid; and having no light the 
boys were compelled to camp under the 
sheltering boughs of a cedar. They were 
wet to the skin, from the rain and from 
crossing the creek many times during the 
afternoon. One had a Recreation water- 
proof matchbox, so they were able to make 
a fire, or a smoke, as Kemp called it. And 
there on a bed of rocks, just at the- edge 
of the roaring stream, they passed the 
night. 
Next morning they washed their smoke- 



RAFTING ON THE ST. JOE. 



179 



grimed faces, lit their pipes in lien of break- 
fast, and started for the St. Joe. They 
reached our camp about 11 o'clock, just 
in time to help empty a kettleful of bacon 
and beans that I had prepared. 

The afternoon we spent building our 
raft. We cut 2 dry cedar logs 18 feet long 
and about 14 inches in diameter, split them, 
spiked on 4 strong crossbars, built an up- 
per deck with split cedar boards and were 
ready to set sail. 

Late in the afternoon it cleared a little, 
and after whipping the stream about an 
hour Martin and George came in with 3 
trout. This stirred Ralph and Kemp to 
emulation, and with a willow pole, a bit 
of line, and a white miller that I gave 
them, they went 200 yards down stream 
and returned in 30 minutes with 12 one- 
pounders. Our supper that night was 
surely immense ; in the language of the 
Florida kid, "If I ever et anythin' that 
good before I kaint recollect it." 

Next morning we rolled our outfit in 2 
tarpaulins, placed them on the upper deck 
on the raft, made both fast with * jpe, bid 
Ralph and Kemp good bye, untied our 
anchor line and were off. Where we 
launched our raft, the St. Joe is about 80 
yards wide, and there is a long stretch of 
rapids just below. We had provided 3 
long cedar poles for steering and 2 paddles 
for still water. As we moved from the 
bank toward the main channel, our light 
raft was caught by the swift current and 
carried along at great speed. 

A feeling of mingled awe and pleasure 
kept us silent until we had shot the rapids 
and were gliding placidly on smooth water. 
Other rapids came in quick succession and 
we soon recovered from our first nervous- 
ness and felt at home on our raft. 

Martin rigged his split bamboo, and at 
the first cast reeled in a big trout. This 
was more than I could stand and I was 
soon his first assistant. Poor George, who 
had never caught anything but catfish, 
back in Missouri, did not take readily to 
trout fishing. Every time he got a strike 
he tried to yank the fish's head off. By 
noon we had all the trout we wanted ; so, 
heading for shore, we were soon landed 
and all hands busy around the camp fire. 

Late in the afternoon we went aboard 



and ran down to the mouth of South Fork, 
or Marble creek. There we found some 
wickiups, built by a party who had preceded 
us, and tied up for the night. After pass- 
ing Marble creek the trout were so plen- 
tiful that, as Martin said, even a Missourian 
could catch them. But when George land- 
ed the largest fish of the lot, Martin was 
mad. 

Our bill of fare on the trip consisted of 
grouse, ducks and trout, with bacon and 
beans, flapjacks, and an occasional pudding 
on the side. 

The next few days were spent in drift- 
ing with the current, and a royal time we 
had. We had been cautioned about the 
danger of going over the Flysterical, Black 
Prince, and Hell Gate rapids. We had 
expected to let the raft down over them 
with a rope. But Martin had become so 
expert with the pole, that we ran the 3 
rapids without mishap. Our only accident 
occurred when, as I was standing on the 
rear end and poling in opposition to Mar- 
tin, we ran head on a big boulder, and 
Martin was pitched about 10 feet forward 
into swift water. He did not say a word, 
but the look he gave me expressed his 
thoughts. 

The first sign of civilization we came 
across was at Elk prairie, a few miles 
above slack water. Just as we rounded a 
bend in the river, we saw a tent on the 
bank and a man emerging therefrom, who 
hailed us with a cheery "Hey there ! come 
over and have a jolt." The echo of his 
voice had barely returned from the oppo- 
site bank, when George and Martin were 
pulling wildly for the shore. The "jolt" 
consisted of about 2 inches of good whis- 
ky in the bottom of a tincup. 

We learned that a man coming down the 
river the day before in a canoe, had killed 
a bear 2 miles above the camp ; also that 
it was the 14th bear killed that fall be- 
tween Marble creek and the head of navi- 
gation, a distance of 35 miles. 

In a few days we were at St. Joe, and 
it was like parting from a friend, when 
we transferred our baggage from the raft 
to the steamboat. The next day we had a 
beautiful ride down the river and across 
lake Cceur D'Alene to Harrison, where we 
took the train fpr home. 



Mr. Smith (in street car) — Madam, take 
my seat. 

Mrs. Jones (who has been standing 
15 minutes) — No, thanks. I get off at 
the next corner. 

Mr. Smith— That's all right. So do I.— 
Chicago Journal. 



■'.". '. •■:■■ . . ■: ■ ■' ■ ■ >:: ■■. 



VS**? 



^■$iM-^ ^Sfc't-'sQ&fM, 









"I CAN GO TO SLEEP AND CATCH MORE FISH THAN YOU CAN, AWAKE." 

J§9 



CATCHING A CATFISH. 



F. D. GREENE. 



One September day, a few years ago, El- 
mer, Joe and I went to the Ore Beds, a fine 
bit of fishing water in the Des Moines river, 
1 4 miles from town . We had procured bait 
the previous day, and at 3:45 we were off. 
Bristol steel rods, wading pants, dry cloth- 
ing in case of accidents, minnow seine, 
horse feed, lunch, etc., filled the wagon 
box. A few minutes' drive took us to the 
creek where our bait had been planted. I 
hastened to where we had sunk the pail, at 
the roots of an overhanging tree, where 
the water was about 4 feet deep. A strong 
twine tied the pail to the roots of the tree. 
Grasping the tree with my left hand I 
reached down to untie the cord. I weighed 
200 pounds. The earth crumbled, and 
with a tremendous splash I went to the 
creek bottom. I scrambled out and 
carrying the pail with me returned to the 
wagon, the water running off my clothing 
in streams and sloshing in my boots. Of 
course my appearance was the signal for 
hilarity, but I climbed in and we drove on. 
The other boys were more experienced 
anglers than I, and always delighted in 
advising me how to hook my bait, how to 
cast, when to strike, etc. On this occasion 
my tumble into the creek gave them an 
opening of which they were not slow to 
take advantage. I was at odds against 2, 
but I finally made this proposition: We 
were to bait up and start even; the last to 
land his first fish was to be thrown into the 
river, fully dressed, by the remaining 2 ; to 
be debarred from fishing any more that 
day; to prepare lunch, carry minnows to 
the others, and, in fact, be at the beck 
of the others for the remainder of the day. 

This proposition was a stunner, but 
they dared not squeal, so it was agreed to. 
Arrived at the river, we went down to a 
sand bar, just touched by the rising sun. 
This bar was about 3 feet high. Where 
the river washed its edge it was hard and 
wet, but the top was dry and warm, and 
made a comfortable seat. 

Rods were put together, hooks baited, 
and at the word, 3 minnows sailed out and 
dropped softly in the river. The contest 
was on. We cast and reeled in, east again 
and allowed the bait to drift with the cur- 
rent. Two hours went by and not one of 
the 3 got a bite. 

Elmer had been out late the evening be- 
fore, and, as' the sun grew warm, he be- 
came sleepy and finally called out, 

"You fellows can't catch fish anyhow. 
I can go to sleep and catch more fish than 
you can awake." 

He put on a lively chub and sticking 



the butt of his rod into the sand bank, 
with the click on his reel set, he dropped 
down on the warm sand and was soon 
snoring comfortably. 

Joe and I continued to work every point 
we knew, but to no avail. Elmer had been 
sleeping about 15 minutes, when we heard 
his reel. Instantly he awoke, grasped his 
rod and struck. 

"I told you I could go to sleep and 
catch 'em," he shouted, as he reeled in a 
3 pound catfish. This he slipped on the 
string which was tied to the handle of the 
minnow bucket, and which always held 
Joe's hook extractor. 

Joe and I, of course, were quite sore, but 
took it good naturedly. Elmer baited 
anew, cast out into the current, stuck his 
rod in the sand and with a final chuckle and 
a repetition of his former boast was soon 
asleep again. 

Waiting till I knew he was asleep, I 
strolled down to where I could cast over 
his line, and after 2 or 3 attempts, hooked 
it and carefully drew it in. Joe was ready 
with the catfish, taken from the string, and 
setting the hook on Elmer's line into its 
back, just forward of the tail, we turned 
it loose, hurried back to our posts and 
were industriously fishing when, in about 
3 minutes there was a terrific buzz of El- 
mer's reel. With a wild yell he grasped 
the rod and shouted. 

"Listen at that! He's a whale, sure!" 

He struck, and holding the butt of the 
rod against his waist, shouted, 

"I'm afraid I can't land him!" 

Meanwhile the catfish was making des- 
perate efforts to get away and not being 
handicapped by having the hook in his 
mouth, was making Elmer's rod bend and 
taking out line in his rushes, till he had 
nearly all of it. Then it became a case of 
reel in or lose the fish. 

Joe and I had rushed to Elmer and were 
giving him all kinds of advice about hand- 
ling the "whale"; commenting on its 
strength shown ^by the way the rod bent, 
adding all we could to the excitement, and 
urging him to land his fish. He was 
white with excitement, and his face and 
actions were a study as he carefully reeled 
in. The catfish was evidently getting tired, 
and was coming easier every moment. I 
made a rush for my rod which was stuck in 
the bank, farther up stream, and Joe fol- 
lowed. It was impossible to say what 
Elmer would do when he discovered the 
situation. 

In a few moments he brought to view his 
whale. He stood petrified for a few 



i«i 



1 82 



RECREATION. 



seconds till the joke dawned fully on 
him. Then he was a wild man. Joe 
waded part way across the river for 
safety. I rolled on the sand and howled. 
It was all over with Elmer in a few min- 
utes, but it was hot while it lasted. He 
tired himself out with the violence of his 
emotions. Then he sat down on the sand 
and was quiet a while. Finally he cut out 
the hook, strung the catfish again and, with 
a sickly grin, remarked, 

"I'll get even with you boys yet;" after 
which he went to sleep again, but did not 
put out any bait. 

Shortly after he went to sleep Joe caught 
a small pike which swallowed the hook. 
He untied the string, with Elmer's catfish 
on it, to use the hook extractor, and after 
putting his pike on a separate string, for- 
got to tie the other one to the pail. The 
catfish promptly swam away taking the 
hook extractor with him on the end of the 
stringer. I also landed a pike, and when 
I went to the pail to get bait, I discovered 
the loss of the cat and the extractor. 
Thereupon Joe and I agreed to affirm that 
Elmer had not caught a catfish; that he had 
not been awake since setting his rod; that 
he must have dreamed about the catfish; 
and as we each had a fish to show and he 
had none, we would make a bluff to throw 
him into the river, as agreed. 

It was about noon, so to make our bluff 
good, we shouted at Elmer to wake up and 
get lunch ready. He stood up, stretching 
and yawning, and asked, 

"What are you fellows howling about? 
Have you caught anything yet?" 

We replied that we had, and, as he had 



not, he was due to get the lunch ready, 
feed the team, etc., and then be thrown 
into the river. He walked up toward us, 
laughing, and began to talk about his cat- 
fish. We expressed great surprise at his 
story, told him he must have been dream- 
ing, and insisted that he had not moved 
after he first went to sleep. 

He looked at us in disgusted amazement, 
and walked over to the minnow pail to look 
at. the catfish. Not finding it he began, 

"Where is that cat — -," Joe broke in, 
"Oh, come now, Elmer, you can't run any 
bluff on us. You haven't had a bite and 
you're due for a bath, so get ready. Your 
pipe dreams don't go." 

Then Elmer raved and hunted for the 
catfish. Finally he asked Joe for his ex- 
tractor. Joe said he didn't bring it with 
him. Then doubt began to grow in 
Elmer's mind. He fixed the lunch and 
fed the team, and we ate our lunch with 
our rods set and listening for the click. 

Elmer said little during lunch, but when 
we announced our intention of throwing 
him into the river, he rebelled. After 
quite a talk, we agreed to let that part of 
the program go. 

We had a fairly good catch when we 
started home, about sundown. As we 
rolled along the smooth road, Elmer began 
to recover his usual good nature and talka- 
tiveness, and we soon had the whole story. 
It was a strain for Joe and me to keep 
straight faces and laugh at proper times, 
but we managed it. 

Joe or I never told Elmer the facts, but 
we told some of the other boys, and Elmer 
' must have learned the truth later. 



BOB WHITE. 

IRA SWEET. 

How oft have I listened to you, Mr. Quail, When golden . October's soft, halcyon 
As you sounded your notes from some days 

mossy old rail, Brought out the gay hunters to roam 
While your wife on the nest knew that woodland ways, 

nothing was wrong, And the voice of the gun sounded far o'er 
As she heard your sweet music, that tender the plain, 

love song, I heard you call softly, again and again, 
Bob White! Bob White! Bob White! Bob White! 

How oft have I heard you, when summer And when you fell dead at the nitro's sharp 

was nigh, crack, 

As the gathering tempest quick darkened I tenderly placed you within the game 

the sky ! sack ; 

While other birds, frightened, all scattered Then blithely sped on, for from over the 

on wing, hill 

You chanted your song and defied the Came the notes of your comrades, who 

storm-king, sang with a will, 

Bob White ! Bob White ! Bob White ! Bob White ! 



QUAIL SHOOTING IN KENTUCKY. 



A. S. ATKINSON. 



My father, W. B. Atkinson, owns 2 
pointer puppies, BiltO' and Lottie, and I own 
one, named Point, born January 5th, 1902. 
I bought my puppy when she was 8 months 
old. She had been in the field once, when 
about 7 months old, making 3 points, one 
on a covey and 2 singles. The next time 
she was in the field, several weeks before 
the season opened, she made a dozen points, 
which she handled with wonderful natural 
dog wisdom. That time I had my gun 
for the purpose of letting her hear the noise 
it made and otherwise getting acquainted 
with it. When she found the first covey 
that day, I took the shells out of my gun 
to make sure I would not shoot. Point 
held steady, something few puppies ever 
do, and did not break to wing 1 . I fol- 
lowed her in many hunts like that before 
our season opened. She worked well on 
larks and I taught her to retrieve with 
them. 

On our first hunt my father and I had 
been in the field about 15 minutes when 
father flushed a covey of quails, the dogs 
not being near. We followed them ; but 
before we found them again Point made 
one of those grand old sure looking points, 
father's dogs backing nicely. I walked in 
on them and downed one bird, father not 
being in the rise. 

We went after the birds. Point made 
a fine point on what I supposed a single ; 
but instead out came 2. I made a good 
double, Point retrieving both singly. Lot- 
tie at the same time pointed for father, he 
bagging his bird. 

Point went about 50 yards and again 
pointed. Father came up thinking, "now 
if the boy misses, I'll get the bird ;" but 
my aim was good and Point brought the 
game in proudly. 

We went into another field and all dogs 
found another large covey. I killed one 
quail. Point went to where it fell and 
pointed, but broke and began to trail; 
pointed again, broke and began to. trail 
again. I tried to call her off, but she 
seemed to know what she was doing. I 



went back to where the bird fell but could 
not find it. I looked around and saw 
Point coming, about 200 yards away, with 
my winged bird in her mouth, still alive. 
I need not say I was proud of my dog. 

We hunted our day out, and bagged 13 
birds. It so' happened that 8 of them 
were in my coat and 5 in father's. That 
was not many, but we had as much sport 
as he who kills more. We found in all 
about 8 coveys ; but most of them were 
in bad places for shooting. Some we did 
not get a shot at. 

Birds are numerous in Warren county; 
but where we find them they have a good 
chance to get away. Every lover of dogs 
thinks he has an exception in the dog line. 
I have followed many puppies in the field; 
but Point is a wonder. She pointed near- 
ly 200 quails last season. At first she was 
not particular what she pointed. A field 
mouse, lark, rabbit, ground sparrow, mole, 
cat, chicken or terrapin, being good enough 
for her; but she soon learned that birds 
were the things I sought. 

One evening I was out with a friend. I 
had killed a bird. He and I were trying 
to teach his setter pup to retrieve. When 
we were ready to go, I could not see my 
dog. Almost at the same time I saw 3 
birds come to the top of the corn and 
make for the river, which was near. I 
called loudly, "Steady, Point," not yet 
seeing her. We walked down to the corn 
and about 25 feet in the corn she was 
stretched at full length on the remaining 
covey of about 18 birds. I have never seen 
any other dog hold a point after some of 
a covey had risen. 

The last day of our season, Point found 
a covey of 20 birds. She held them until 
I flushed. They went into the thicket 
We followed. She made a single point 
and I flushed the bird. She went about 
20 feet and pointed again. I came up. 
Imagine my surprise to find she had 
pointed a sow and 5 pigs, they being be- 
hind a log where she could not see them. 
When the old sow grunted, Point jumped 
as if she had been shot. 



Tourist — When does the next train start 
for Cork, porter? 

Irish Porter — She's just gone, sorr. — Ex- 
change. 

183 




THE DOCTOR PULLED UP A GREAT SILVER-SIDED EEL, 



184 



A LEAF FROM THE LOG OF THE ROSAMOND. 



CHAS. VAN BRUNT, JR. 



All the long September afternoon the 
white yacht had swung idly at anchor, 
coquetting with the ebb tide and the South 
w.nd. On board all was quiet. Leaning 
against the rail of the companion way sat 
the skipper, reading. Tall, stalwart, and 
grey whiskered, he looked a typical old- 
time yacht captain. Scattered about the 
waist outside the cocksprit was a varied 
collection of rods, reels, lines and nets, 
proclaiming the mission of the craft. On 
top of the cabin lay a man asleep. When 
the sun was nearing the horizon he sat 
up, and leaning over, called down the com- 
panion way: 

"Say, below ! If you fellows expect to 
catch a bass at the turn of the tide, it's 
time you were moving." 

"All right," and with the reply 3 men 
came tumbling up and began a hurried 
examination of reels and lines. 

After a time the lines were entangled 
and wound snug, bait was put into the 
boats and we swung away from the yacht. 
Billy in a boat with the captain's son, who 
had joined the party from the forepeak, 
-started across the flats for a point where 
bass were supposed to be anxiously await- 
ing them. 

The Doctor, who was the commodore of 
the club, and who could always "tell a bass 
bite from that of any other living thing," 
the civil engineer and I made up the party. 
Hugging the flats, to avoid the sweep of 
the tide which went racing toward the 
inlet, we pulled briskly. Billy and John 
soon came to grief on the flats. Where 
they expected to find 10 inches of water, 
there was only 3, and we could see them, 
hard aground and half a mile from the 
desired point, holding a council of war. 
But we could not tarry; time was pre- 
cious, and our own troubles were begin- 
ning. We 1 ad reached the place where 
we were to turn off from the channel to 
go over the flats into a thoroughfare where 
we expected to fish. 

Did you ever try to push a boat over the 
flats in a tideway? A bay man will stand 
in his boat and push her along almost as 
fast as you can row, and he seems to need 
only a heavy dew to float him anywhere 
he pleases. But just take that oar yourself 
and see what happens ; before you have 
gone a rod the sand bumps against the 
bottom of your boat, and the chances are 
you will have to get out, take the tow 
line over your shoulder and drag the skiff 
with her bottom grating over perriwinkle 
and clam shells the full length of the flat. 



By dint of pushing and pulling, we were 
soon over and quietly rowing through the 
thoroughfare ; avoiding the deep places, 
and handling the oars as quietly as pos- 
sible. You can not catch a striped bass 
by making a lot of noise ; he always has his 
weather eye and ear open. Arriving at 
the farther end of the thoroughfare where 
it opened into the bay, the doctor and the 
engineer were placed on one point and I 
rowed to the other, a distance of about 
75 feet. Fastening the boat along the edge 
so she could not swing, and getting rod, 
reel and line in order, a box of cut bait 
close at hand, and bull's eye lantern lighted 
and stowed away under the seat, I lit my 
pipe and sat down to await events. 

The tide was still running ebb, the wind 
had died down and across the 'fore the 
forms of my companions were silhouetted 
against the evening sky. A mud hen came 
out of that somewhere that birds alone 
know and ran along a little fringe of 
muddy sedge just beyond the stern of the 
boat. Two meadow wrens perched on the 
swaying sedge not 5 feet from me, and 
sang before they flew away into the shad- 
ows that were lengthening over land and 
sea. The sun had disappeared beneath a 
sunset cloud that for a moment covered 
land, and sea, and sky with crimson glory, 
and tinged the crests of the breakers off 
the inlet, as with the blood of hapless sea- 
men. The night came on, and still the ebb 
tide ran. Out of the South came revolving 
flashes from the light house, and in the 
West hung Venus, like a golden lamp. 
Over the sand dunes came the moon of 
the great gray sea, with occasional whiffs 
of its seaweed and brine. 

Suddenly there was a different pulse in 
the air, and a whispering all through the 
sedge and the rushes. Did you ever hear 
it when the tide turned? The ebb will run 
on, and on, and there does not seem to be 
a living thing in all the great waters, until 
there comes a something you can almost 
feel, a presence in and around ; there is a 
different sound in the lap of the tide, and 
the water grows tremulant with the motion 
of myriads of living things. Not 10 feet 
away a school of mullet breaks in a foam- 
ing rush and gleams for a moment in the 
phosphorent tide.. 

A low whistle came across the water 
from my companions and I knew they 
were alert. Now for work, for our fishing 
must be done within 30 minutes. I put on 
a fresh bait and cast across the tide. 
There ! Oh, pshaw ! only a nibbler ! Well, 



18s 



1 86 



RECREATION. 



there are poorer pan fish than a half pound 
perch. Another great rush of leaping mul- 
let, and I east right in the middle of the 
swirl ; then the rod bent almost double and 
the reel sang its merry song. A great leap 
from the water, a rush, and then with 
slow, careful work I brought to the boat 
a fair sized bass. Another cast. That 
time, just along the edge of the flat where 
the tide swirled. The bait hardly had time 
to touch the water, before the rod surged 
and bent. Confound the fish ! Would he 
never stop? Sixty, 80 yards of line he 
took before the reel stopped. Was he off? 
No; for with a "zimp" the line tightened, 
as he headed in another direction, this time 
against the tide. Ten minutes of work, 
and then he slowly surrendered, and I lifted 
a 5-pound bass aboard. 

From across the 'fore I heard the Doc- 
tor's voice: "There! that is a bass sure! 
Now I'll show you how to land him.." 

Then came a noise of splashing and 
slapping, and a yell of laughter from the 
Engineer as the Doctor pulled up a great 
silver-sided eel. 

The Engineer landed a fish, and pres- 
ently I heard the Doctor say : "Confound 
it, there is another pesky eel. Get your 
nippers ready and I'll yank him out and — " 

Another roar from the Engineer, and the 
Doctor exclaimed: "Well, if that ain't 
the biggest fool bass I ever saw. He bit 
just like an eel." 

And so the fun went on for half an 



hour until we had 5 bass and a col- 
lection of perch, eels and goodies, 
and it was time to go aboard. The wind 
came in stiffly from the Southeast, and 
great banks of fog shut out the stars. 
Out in the channel we heard the flood tide 
roaring, and knew it would be a nasty 
pull back to the yacht. 

Out across the flats we rowed; there 
was plenty of water everywhere. As we 
pushed through the short grass, zig zag 
lines of phosphorent fire marked the flight 
of eels and fish, alarmed by the boat. Over 
the flats and out in the channel darkness 
was everywhere save as we caught the 
flash from the lighthouse that gave us 
our bearings,. Our boat jumped and 
plunged in the raging water and the spray 
drenched us to the skin. At length we 
could make out the yacht ; it put new vigor 
in us and we were soon aboard. 

John and Billy came in about the same 
time, but their's had been miserable luck, 
a regular water haul. 

Bart, the cook, had a hot supper waiting 
for us, and throwing off our wet clothing 
and rubber boots, we gathered around the 
table in the genial warmth of the cabin. 

Then we turned in, lulled by the rocking 
of the yacht and the music of the wind in 
the rigging, to sleep the sleep of tired 
anglers. Just as we were slipping off 
the flats into the "deep water of dreamland 
the Doctor muttered, "You can't fool the 
boss on a bass bite." 




FROM PAINTING BY W. L. STEWARD. 



LAND-LOCKED SALMON. 



AMONG THE SANDHILLS. 



JOHN MC NEIL. 



From Virginia to Mississippi runs a 
ridge of sandhills, between the red clay 
of the foot hills and the peaty loam of the 
Atlantic slope. The soil is poor, except 
for grapes, and the pine forest and wire- 
grass hold their ground with little of 
human interference. 

The Seaboard railway, however, rides 
the backbone of this ridge, from a point 
near Raleigh to Hamlet, and has induced 
the growth of villages along its line pop- 
ulated chiefly by section hands and grape 
farmers. Except for such oases, the sand- 
hills will probably remain a perpetual wil- 
derness, an asylum for deer, turkeys and 
foxes, so rapidly disappearing elsewhere. 

One afternoon, half an hour before sun- 
set, I left the train at Keyser, expecting to 
be met by a flat country farmer, to whose 
home I was bent on business. My letter 
had miscarried and no farmer was there. 

"Ten miles to Aberdeen," said the sta- 
tion agent in answer to my question. 
'That's the closest place to git a boss." 

"How far to Major Tillman's?" I in- 
quired. 

"Sixteen miles f'om heah and 20 f'om 
Aberdeen. Sorry, but you can't git out 
o' footin' 10 miles at least." 

"Well," I sighed, "I prefer to foot 16 
to footing 10 and riding 20; so good luck 
to you !" and with my small grip slung 
lightly over my shoulder I set out, ac- 
cording to directions, to the Southward. 

The sun was half hidden behind the blue 
bank of cloud that skirted the horizon, and 
a thousand locusts were rasping the air 
with their harsh voices. The pure breath 
of the pine woods exhilarated me. As 
twilight died into dusk, the katydids suc- 
ceeded the locust choir ; the pines moaned 
in solemn monotone, so that I felt as if 
I were among the pillars of some great 
cathedral ; and when the big, yellow moon, 
like a forest fire, kindled the Eastern tree 
tops, a whippoorwill in the next valley be- 
gan telling his pathetic experiences to a 
listening world. 

Those who understand such things say 
that poetry is that which awakens within 
us when we hear sweet sounds, feast our 
eyes on the beautiful, or feel, from any 
other cause, lofty emotions. I was then 
full of poetry, awakened by this commun- 
ion with the soul of nature; but when my 
legs began to ache with fatigue, and every 
hill I came to was an exact counterpart 
of the one I had just crossed, I felt more 
like composing an ode on the blessedness 
of sleep than I had ever felt before. 



Why not play the role of a hale and 
hearty huntsman and sleep romantically 
in the woods, on the lap of my mother, 
under the eye of my stars and of the pa- 
troness of hunters, Diana the chaste, and 
so on? Accommodations so bountiful and 
guests so rare, I was sure of my welcome. 
On the matted wiregrass, with my grip for 
a pillow, I stretched my listless length. 

"How hospitable," I thought, with a 
sigh, "is nature. She turns her all into 
your hands. No begrudging, no insistence. 
She allows you really to feel at home, the 
last and best accomplishment of a host." 

I was half inclined that in the morning 
I should scatter what money I had on 
the grass, after the fashion of Stevenson, 
in order to settle with my invisible land- 
lord. Before I had srared an hour at the 
moon, however, I decided that Stevenson's 
night in the woods was of a different color 
from this one. Time dragged with leaden 
feet. The fever and fret of that night, with 
its dews, its mosquitoes, and its chill, called 
to my mind again and again the stern phil- 
osophy of Emerson : "Nature is no senti- 
mentalist. She does not cosset or pamper 
us. The cold, inconsiderate of persons, 
tingles your blood, benumbs your feet, 
freezes a man like a dewdrop. Providence 
has a wild, rough, incalculable road to its 
end, and it is of no use to try to white- 
wash its huge, mixed instrumentalities, or 
to dress up that terrific benefactor in the 
clean shirt and white neckcloth of a stu- 
dent in divinity." 

I smoked and smoked, saturated the 
grass on all sides with the aroma of to- 
bacco; but the unconquerable bloodsuck- 
ers returned in ever increasing numbers 
until I was forced to break a tuft of dog 
fennel and lay about me like Macbeth 
after Banquo's ghost. The memory of 
that night, to this day, makes me long for 
3 things : all the mosquitoes in a big bag ; 
an idle afternoon, and a blackgum maul. 

Though unconscious of having slept at 
all, I was startled as if from sleep by the 
uncanny sensation of something cold and 
moist wrigggling over my face. I sprang 
up and shook myself. It was not a lizard 
nor a snail, however, but the nose of a 
bird dog. This herald of humanity was 
standing near, a picture of penitence, his 
eyes were full of the "world sorrow" and 
his tail drooped with expression. I seized 
him and awaited developments. 

Gray morning was beginning to creep 
out. A few quails, scattered overnight, 
were calling one another. The crows were 



187 



i88 



RECREATION, 



awake. All else, save for the whining of 
the dog, was still. Presently the expected 
happened in the form of a shrill whistle, 
in response to which the dog made a sud- 
den start and broke away, leaving me to 
follow him as best I could. It was rough 
work to keep him in sight, but I did it, 
and after a quarter of a mile of hurrying 
he brought me up with his fellow hunters. 
These were a white man and a negro; 
the former a strapping, ruddy wight, with 
good nature written in every line of his 
Scottish face. As for the latter, all coons 
look alike to me. 

"Well, suh, you mus' be lost?" inquired 
the white man, standing the butt of his 
muzzle loader on the ground and surveying 
me in frank astonishment. 

When I had explained my situation, he 
expressed his sympathy by vigorous abuse 
of Major Tillman. 

"He otter be ashamed u' hisse'f!" he 
cried, "a leavin' you to bruise about in 
thisher wilduhness all night." 

I suggested that Uncle Sam was more 
likely the one at fault, and changed the 
subject by asking the nature of their 
sport. 
"Tuckeys," was the reply. 
"But it isn't turkey season," I ventured. 
"Aren't you afraid of the law?" 

"I reckon this mus' be your fust trip," 
he surmised, "else you'd know that the 
law don't use in these pairts. Who> knows 
when I kill a tuckey? Er who'd tell, 
s'posin' he did know? We all don't no- 
tice the seasons ner the law when we all 
goes a huntin'. Lemme tell you sump'n'," 
he continued, after another close scrutiny 
of my face, "if you know how to keep 
quiet, we all '11 gin you a little fun to-day." 
"I should be delighted," I answered, 
"but I'm so weak from hunger and fatigue 
that I'm afraid I can't keep up." 

"Fer the bein' hungry, we've got sump'n 
't eat; an' fer the bein' tired, you won't 
hev to do much walkin', fer I know whah 
the tuckeys stays." 

I do not wish to corrupt youth by ap- 
pearing to countenance the violation of 
game laws ; but put this case to yourself. 
There was hardly an alternative, so they 
robbed their pockets of perhaps more 
than I could eat, and while I attacked 
them voraciously, we set forward, the mas- 
ter of ceremonies, whose name I found to 
be Scot Gillis, talking constantly. He told 
me of the wonders he saw when he went 
to Fayetteville ; of the peculiarities of his 
nearest neighbors, and how each of them 
or his ancestors happened to settle in those 
parts; and, in a spirit inclined toward 
boasting, of the number and quality of 
his own cows, hogs, and goats. 
"But we-all been kinder onfortunate 



this yeah," he confessed. "More so 'n 
usual. Ev'ry yeah the 'coons an' squir'ls 
eats our co'n, the foxes an' minks an' 
'possums eats our chickens an' pigs, to say 
nothin' u' the hawks, the nigguhs, an' 
the cholery. But this yeah we all been 
pairt u' the time burnt up in drouths an' 
the rest u' the time a mirin' in mud; a 
mad dog ran among 17 uf our cows an' 
bit 'em an' they went mad an' raised the 
foul fien's; one day out 26 hawgs was a 
layin' in the's bed atween 2 pines, when 
all at onced the lightnin' struck 'em like a 
aH at onced the lightnin' struck 'em." 

There is no imagining when he would 
have made an end, had not the dog sprung 
a drove of turkeys and cut short his narra- 
tive. Up they flew, some 300 yards before 
us, with a great roaring of wings and the 
frightened "tuck, tuck!" which, as Scot 
later informed me, "made them be called 
tuckeys." Scot would have made a great 
etymologist. 

The place was covered with a thick 
growth, consisting partly of oak, and even 
of some dogwood. How shadowy and 
cool it was ! I did not like to leave that 
little valley in a senseless tramp after the 
wildest of wild game. 

"Why, Scot," I complained, "they got 
away without a single shot." 

He vouchsafed no reply until we came 
to the spot whence the fowls had been 
flushed. He then gave the negro's gun to 
me, and, calling in the dog, put him in 
charge of the negro. 

"Take 'im way off, Babe," he directed, 
"an' set a straddle uf 'im. Don't let 'im 
git away by no means, an' if 'e tries to 
holler, choke 'im. 

"Kin you shoot?" he asked, turning to 
me. 

"I have never tried turkeys," I respond- 
ed, "but I can tap 8 birds out of 10." 

"That'll do. You set right heah, side u' 
this lawg. Notice that you ar' on the side 
tordze the turkeys. When I go to yelpin' 
'em, if you see 'em comin' in front u' you, 
don't try to git behin' the lawg. A tuckey 
kin see the tip eend u' your nose around 
a tree er over a lawg, but he ain't a lookin' 
fer you in plain sight on his side u' the 
blind. An' if you git a shot, don't move 
till I say so. A tuckey don't min' the 
smell er soun' u' powder like the sight uf 
a man." 

With these instructions he left me. I 
sat down in the shade of the log, with a 
long breath of relaxation, and then every- 
thing fell silent. I seemed to be encamped 
on the turkey playground. Their wallows 
were all about me, particularly in the soft 
bed of decayed wood near the log. 

At first my surroundings appeared to be 
entirely lifeless, nothing astir; but before 



AMONG THE SAND HILLS. 



189 



I hnd been there 5 minutes a bug began to 
force his way noisily through the leaves; a 
bumble bee swang himself heavily up from 
a tiny nettle blossom and dropped away in 
search of new sweets ; a flying squirrel 
squeaked and showed her nose and big 
bright eyes at the hollow of a dogwood, 
thus unconsciously betraying the secret of 
her nest ; an old snail resumed his proverb- 
making march to nowhere ; there were a 
thousand stirrings of life which the least 
movement on my part would have si- 
lenced. 

I had been at my post some 15 minutes, 
and my attention was engrossed by the 
Nimrod spectacle of black ants dragging 
a worm to their hill, when Scot made a 
start at his yelping. The sound was not 
so much like the call of a turkey as a kind 
of composite barnyard cry, a general mix- 
ture of quacking, hen singing, goose gan- 
dering, with a small intermixture of a 
foreign vibration, namely, crow cawing; 
but it did the work. The yelping was 
done timidly, as if the yelper were a mod- 
est young hen who no sooner spoke her 
mind than she regretted it and felt like 
apologizing. It was also brief. Three 
calls, then a pause ; sometimes 4 calls ; 
sometimes 2. 

Before me the slope gradually rose for 
half a mile or more and was for the most 
part in plain view. As I kept my eyes in 
that direction I presently saw something 
top the hill, running. It was making di- 
rectly for me, and as it came nearer I rec- 
ognized a well grown turkey. Almost 
breathless I waited until she ran up within 
40 yards of me, when she winded me, 
stopped, craned her neck, and uttered, as 
in soliliquy, 2 or 3 low "tucks." I eased 
the barrel of my gun down till it bore 
on her breast; then I fired. 

Before the smoke had cleared away, 
Dike, the dog, rushed on the scene, hotly 
followed by his guardian, Babe. This led 
to some stiff phrases from Scot, request- 
ing Babe to return to his lair with Dike. 

"What 'as the matter? How did you 
shoot?" Scot inquired. 

When I replied, he exclaimed : 

"Oh, yes ; I forgot to tell you that they 
'11 shed shot like a duck sheds water. You 
ort to er waited till she turnt sideways er 
clean round, an' er stuck the shot in ag'in' 
the grain. Now set thah again an' fix the 
next on' right." 

After 15 minutes of silence and another 
15 minutes of yelping, I caught sight of a 
gobbler coming my way. His gait was 
not so fast as the hen's had been, but he 
walked with more assurance. I put my 
gun in position and sat perfectly still until 
he